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Past Student Awards

Use the filters below to find awards made to CSU students by Program, Campus, or Year. Go to Past Faculty Awards​​​​​. ​

 

COAST Award Program

 

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Year

 
  
  
  
  
  
  
Meeting
  
  
AwardTitle
Abstract
  
  
  
collapse Year and Status : 2022-23 Undergraduate Student Travel Program Awards ‎(1)
  
ElizabethMurguia2022-23Elinne BecketBecket
Lake Arrowhead Microbial Genomics (LAMG) Conference​
UndergraduateElizabeth Murguia, Christian Lopezguerra, Mackenzie Pylant, Ebony Stretch, Dennis Zanesco, Matthew Cope, Uriel Rivera, Anahita Rahimi, Elinne Becket
Taxonomic and Antibiotic Resistance Changes to Coastal Microbiomes in Response to Rainstorm Runoff​
Antibiotic resistance (AR) is a global healthcare issue driven by the overuse of antibiotics in clinical, agriculture, and aquaculture applications. Urban and agricultural runoff introduce antibiotic-resistant bacteria and antibiotic contamination to recipient environments. Antibiotics change microbial community compositions in favor of resistant species and can trigger the exchange of AR genes. Mapping the changes in microbial community compositions and AR gene abundance has yet to be elucidated in response to rainstorm runoff. Sampling at the Batiquitos lagoon outlet in California occurred over 14 days; before, during, and after the first two rainstorms of the 2019-2020 season. Coastal water was captured on-site on a 0.22 µm mixed cellulose ester membrane filter. We performed total DNA isolation and shotgun library preparation on the isolated microbiomes followed by 2 x 150 base paired-end sequencing. Microbial composition and AR gene identification was performed on the resulting metagenomes, to determine a time course profile of relative microbial abundance and antibiotic resistance profiles. Additionally, we performed meta-SourceTracker analysis on the time course metagenomes to investigate proportions of exogenous and endogenous microbial community members throughout and following rainstorms, as well as to explore possible sources of exogenous taxa. We observed an overall bimodal increase in alpha diversity and AR gene counts in the 24-72-hour period following each rainstorm. Taxonomic changes are reflected by a relative depletion of Cyanobacteria and relative increase in Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes. The microbial community profile returned to a pre-storm composition after approximately six days contrary to the three-day recovery time commonly referenced.​
San MarcosStudent Travel Program2022-23 Undergraduate Student Travel Program Awards
collapse Year and Status : 2022-23 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards ‎(11)
  
CarlosBarron2022-23Joseph CarlinCarlin
GSA Connects 2022​
GraduateBarron, Carlos; Carlin, Joseph; Baez, Kimberly; Bareno, Andres; Beener, Katya
Characterizing Sub-Decadal Sedimentation Within a Southern California Coastal Wetland Over the Past Century​
Estuaries and coastal wetlands are ecosystems that have increasingly been at risk in recent history due to natural and anthropogenic impacts. These impacts can be made directly to the coastal zone or occur within the watershed. Regardless of where the alterations occur, the impacts are recorded within the sediment records of these coastal environments. Therefore, estuarine sediments can be a valuable archive for natural and anthropogenic alterations within coastal systems. The Tijuana River Estuary (TRE) is a wetland system in Southern California located proximal to the US-Mexico border. Urbanization within the watershed, the majority of which is in Mexico, has increased exponentially over the past several decades resulting in a system that can experience massive, pulsed sedimentation events during wet periods. In this study we looked to characterize changes in sedimentation within the TRE over the past several decades with an emphasis on the impacts of human alterations and natural events. Here we present data from various cores acquired in areas proximal to the active river mouth and areas located adjacent to tidal creeks distal from the river mouth. The data shows an overall peak in sediment accumulation rates in the late 1990s/early 2000s followed by a general decrease in sedimentation rates in the following decades. These peaks in sedimentation coincides with the intense, and relatively frequent El Nino events during the 1980s and 1990, while the decline in rates is consistent with a more quiescent period post-2000. While the amount sediment delivered to the TRE has varied over decadal timescales, changes in sediment characteristics have been more consistent through time, Over the past ~100 years the sediment in the TRE has become consistently finer, and sedimentary organic carbon analyses suggest an increasing input from marine sources (although pulses of higher terrestrial sources are observed during wetter climate periods). Collectively, these data suggest that the TRE has experienced changes in sediment inputs, both in quantity and type, over the past several decades that is likely related to both climate and human alterations to the system. Understanding these changes will be critical to managing these important habitats in the future.​
FullertonStudent Travel Program2022-23 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
KatyaBeener2022-23Joseph CarlinCarlin
GSA Connects 2022​
GraduateBeener, Katya; Carlin, Joseph; Zacherl, Danielle; Whitcraft, Christine; Miller, Luke; Arre, Claire
Preliminary Data on Seasonal Sedimentation Associated with a Living Shoreline Restoration Project in an Urban Southern California Estuary​
Estuaries in Southern California are particularly vulnerable to sea level rise as they are constrained by urbanization and/or steep topography which limits upland habitat migration. Therefore, estuarine habitat resilience and sustainability in Southern California are primarily dependent on building elevation capital through increases in sedimentation. To address this issue, resource managers in California are increasingly pursuing living shorelines restoration projects as means to minimize shoreline erosion and promote sediment deposition. In this project, we will present preliminary data characterizing seasonal sedimentation associated with a living shorelines restoration project in Newport Bay, Newport Beach, California. Living shorelines were installed in 2016-2017 at four different locations in the estuary, with three different configurations (oysters only, eelgrass only, and oysters and eelgrass combined) and a control site with no modifications at each location. These preliminary data reflect comprehensive sedimentation monitoring that include quantifying bimonthly sediment deposition using sediment tiles and characterizing newly deposited sediment properties including sediment texture and composition. Initial results reveal that the combination oyster/eelgrass living shoreline configuration promoted the highest sediment deposition on average. These preliminary results also reveal that sedimentation was higher in the spring months (March-June) than the winter months (January- March). This is unexpected, as the majority of Southern California’s precipitation (and runoff) occurs during winter months, although precipitation was negligible (max monthly precipitation was 2.5 cm) and increases in streamflow minimal throughout the study period. This may indicate that sediment supplied to this section of the bay comes from marine sources driven by marine processes rather than fluvial sources. Further characterization of the sediment deposited may help to distinguish these sediment sources. Our goal through this project is to determine whether living shorelines are effective at promoting sedimentation up shore within the estuary and therefore may be a useful management tool to address the potential for intertidal habitat loss due to sea level rise in the region.​
FullertonStudent Travel Program2022-23 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
NimaFarchadi2022-23Rebecca L. LewisonLewison
American Fisheries Society​
GraduateNima Farchadi, Heather Welch, Camrin Braun, Katherine Mills, Andrew Allyn, Elliott Hazen, Stephanie Brodie, Nerea Lezama-Ochoa, Steven Bograd, Riley Young-Morse, Alex Kerney, Dylan Pugh, Rebecca Lewison
Impacts of Marine Heatwaves on the Spatiotemporal Distribution of U.S. Pelagic Fisheries​
Persistent extreme oceanic warm events, also referred to as marine heatwaves (MHWs), are already impacting marine ecosystems and the ecosystem services to fisheries and the communties that rely on them. Many marine species are highly mobile and may shift their spatial distributions during anomalous events in response to unfavorable conditions; however, the degree of impact MHWs have on the spatiotemporal distribution of fishing fleets remains porrly understood. Using vessel Automatic Identification System (AIS) data, data-assimilated oceanographic data, and predictive habitat model, we developed dynamic vessel distribution models (dVDMs) for the U.S. Northwest Atlantic pelagic longline fleet to better understand how anomalous environmental conditions (e.g. MHWs) influence the spatiotemporal distribution of fishing effort. Using pelagic longline fisheries in the Atlantic as a case study, our results show that under MHW conditions, suitable fishing habitat in southern regions, south of Cape Hatteras, diminishes whereas northern regions experience gains in suitable habitat. Furthermore, center of gravity analysis on monthly predictions demonstrated variation in the distance and direction of shifts in fleet distributions among regions either shifting poleward, closer to longeline ports, or negligible changes. Since fish populations and fishing fleets may respond to anomalous conditions in divergent ways, the results from this study can help accurately describe and understand the variations in fleet distributions, a key requirement for managers and policy makers to develop management strategies that will support climate-readiness and resilience in U.S. fisheries.​
San DiegoStudent Travel Program2022-23 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
JacksonHoeke2022-23Amanda KahnKahn
Western Society of Naturalists
GraduateHoeke JT, Kahn AS
Assessing the seasonal impacts of the introduced sponge Hymenaiacidon perlevis (Porifera: Demospongiae) in the Elkhorn Slough
Introduced species can have broad effects on ecosystems, but the scope of effects varies. Hymeniacidon perlevis is a cosmopolitan sponge introduced to the Elkhorn Slough since at least 1998. Since introduction, H. perlevis has formed dense aggregations across intertidal mud flats, potentially outcompeting other epifaunal and encrusting organisms. We assessed H. perlevis monthly and explored whether its abundance correlated to environmental conditions. Sponge cover (area per m,2) was measured using randomized photoquadrats from three sites across Elkhorn Slough over 432 days. Max sponge cover was greatest at Azevedo Pond (0.031 m,2) compared to Kirby Park (0.006 m,2) and South Marsh (0.015 m,2). Sponge cover differed between months at Azevedo Pond (bootstrapped ANOVA; n = 38, p < 0.001) with a significant drop in cover from August –January (0.008133 m,2) compared to January through August (0.001001 m,2). Sponge cover did not change significantly over time elsewhere (bootstrapped ANOVA; Kirby Park: n = 48, p = 0.813; South Marsh: n = 87; p = 0.413). Time-lagged Spearman rank cross-correlations between sponge cover and environmental variables (temperature, pH, salinity, DO, turbidity, and precipitation) showed strongest correlations with a lag of 2 – 3 months. This suggest that abundance – and ecological effects – of H. perlevis follow a seasonal pattern in Elkhorn Slough with implications for exploring a seasonal management strategy for this introduced species.
San JoséStudent Travel Program2022-23 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
JamieKerlin2022-23Nyssa SilbigerSilbiger
International Coral Reef Symposium​
GraduateKerlin, J.R.; Barnas, D.M.; Silbiger, N.J.
Effects of submarine groundwater discharge and coral-coral interactions on common coral species, Porites rus
The maintenance of healthy coral reefs is dependent on the growth and physiological responses of corals to abiotic and biotic factors. Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) is freshwater flowing from land, through the marginal seabed, and onto the reef. SGD can affect corals by altering biogeochemical properties of the water (increased nutrients, lower salinity, lower temperature). Additionally, corals are also affected by biotic interactions, such as competition with other coral colonies. The ecological effects of SGD are not yet well-studied, and this study tests the interactive ecological effects of SGD and competition on coral growth rate, metabolism, and endosymbiont physiology. Four coral-coral competition treatments (no competition, dead skeletal, intraspecific, and interspecific) were deployed at twenty locations along a gradient of SGD for two weeks. We measured growth, net photosynthetic, and respiration rates and symbiont count and chlorophyll content of Porites rus before and after deployment. Photosynthesis and respiration showed a significant positive linear relationship with silicate concentration, a commonly used proxy for SGD. However, we saw a weak effect of competition on responses, indicating that the abiotic effect of SGD may outweigh biotic factors at this site and on short timescales. This experiment was conducted during the dry season, when SGD fluxes are minimal, indicating the possibility of an even stronger effect of SGD on corals during the rainy season. As coral metabolism changes along an SGD gradient, there will likely be cascading effects onto the community, like further shifts in biogeochemistry, changes to the community composition, and altered species diversity.
NorthridgeStudent Travel Program2022-23 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
EmilyLadin2022-23Larry AllenAllen
Joint Meeting of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists
GraduateEmily S. Ladin, Larry G. Allen, Michael P. Franklin
An Analysis of the Developmental Osteology of Giant Sea Bass, Stereolepis gigas
Giant sea bass (Stereolepis gigas), are listed as critically endangered by the IUCN, and are the largest bony fish off the coast of Southern California. After fertilization, giant sea bass larvae develop in the plankton and eventually settle to a sandy bottom habitat, but little is known about their early life history stages or what mechanisms drive this transition. This study aims to examine, in detail, the first critical stages of this species including the pre-flexion, flexion, post-flexion, and the transformation stages. Laboratory reared specimens were collected throughout development and preserved. The fixed larvae were double stained with alcian blue and alizarin red, while a small subset were single stained with alizarin red. Osteological development was analyzed amongst the different sized larvae. The morphometric formulas for seven elements are as follows: vertebral column- precaudal 12, caudal 13; dorsal fin X-I, 11; anal fin III, 9; pelvic fin I, 5; pectoral fin 20; caudal fin- principal rays 9+8, procurrent rays- upper 9, lower 9; branchiostegals 7. Knowledge of these developmental stages will give us a better understanding of what is driving giant sea bass larval recruitment, thus allowing better protection of nursery areas and rational fisheries management.
NorthridgeStudent Travel Program2022-23 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
HayleyMapes2022-23Sean LemaLema
American Fisheries Society​
GraduateHayley Mapes, Theresa Bersin, Sean Lema
Heat stress influences on growth and physiology of Black Rockfish (Sebastes melanops)
Teleost fishes experiencing atypically high temperature conditions often show indications of energetic stress. While changes in nutritional status and temperature have each been shown to alter profiles of growth- and stress-related hormones in fish, less is known about how these stressors interact. Here, we examined how differential food availability (‘high’ and ‘low’ feed rations) influenced the growth and physiological responses of Black Rockfish (Sebastes melanops) exposed to a single, short-term heat stress event. Adult Black Rockfish were acclimated under a ‘high’ feed (9% g feed per g body mass per day) ration for 21 d under ambient local ocean temperatures, after which subsets of fish were either transferred to a ‘low’ feed ration (1% ration) or continually maintained on ‘high’ ration. Following 21 d of exposure to these feed rations, fish were exposed to a 26-h heat stress event (increase of ~6°C above acclimation conditions), after which temperature returned to ambient conditions. Fish in both ration treatments showed reduced mass-specific growth rate (SGR) during the 3-week period after the heat stress event, but then increased growth above pre-stressor rates 6 and 9 weeks after the temperature stress. Blood collected from fish at time points before and after the acute heat stress event will be used to examine whether food availability modulates responses of plasma cortisol, lactate, and glucose to short-term heat stress. Our findings indicate that a short-term temperature increase can affect the growth rate of Black Rockfish with possible compensatory growth observed weeks after the acute thermal str​ess. 
San Luis ObispoStudent Travel Program2022-23 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
KalaniOrtiz2022-23Rafael Cuevas UribeCuevas Uribe
Aquaculture Canada and WAS North America​ 2022
GraduateKalani Ortiz, Dr. Rafael Cuevas Uribe
EVALUATING THE GROWTH OF BULL KELP Nereocystis luetkeana FROM HATCHERY TO LONG LINE CULTIVATION IN HUMBOLDT BAY 
The cultivation, restoration, and conservation of macroalgae are emerging mariculture practices in the United States. In spring of 2019, Cal Poly Humboldt partnered with GreenWave to establish one of the first small-scale commercial seaweed farm, ProvidenSea, in California. Since then, the farm has been home to several research projects that focus on regenerative and related initiatives in Humboldt Bay. The purpose of this proposal is to evaluate the cultivation of bull kelp (Nereocystis luetkeana) in a hatchery at the Cal Poly marine lab in Trinidad, CA, and successfully integrate them to grow out in open water in Humboldt Bay. This project will consist of 8 aquaria replicates containing spools (pvc wrapped with speeding string). We will evaluate the growth and morphology of bull kelp using a variety of seeding strings commonly used in different regions for open water cultivation of macroalgae.Once the spools reach the optimal development stage and length (juvenile sporophyte at 3 mm in length), they will be transported to Cal Poly Humboldt ProvidenSea seaweed farm, where they will be out planted in the longline for further assessment of growth.  Nutrients in the seaweed’s tissues and surrounding water will be analyzed to determine the extractive properties of macroalgae grown in the bay. Presently, this is one of the first attempts to grow bull kelp from a hatchery to an ocean farm setting on the northern Pacific coast of California. Results from this study will help in expanding the under-developed research in bull kelp cultivation practices, early gametophyte settlement and provide a foundation for future farmers in regenerative seaweed farming practices within the California northern pacific coast. ​
HumboldtStudent Travel Program2022-23 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
EmmaSiegfried2022-23Darren JohnsonJohnson
Joint Meeting of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists​
GraduateEmma Siegfried and Darren Johnson
Mortality and Metabolic Rate of Larval California Grunion (Leuresthes tenuis) under a Future Climate Change Scenario
Studies investigating the effects of ocean acidification (OA) on larval fish mortality have shown mixed results, suggesting that there is more to the story. To investigate the combined effects of food availability and OA on larval mortality and metabolic rate, larval California Grunion (Leuresthes tenuis) were raised under two pCO2 concentrations (OA: 980 µatm; Ambient: 385 µatm) representing current day and projected scenarios for the study area by the year 2100. These pCO2 levels were crossed with two feeding treatments (80 & 160 Artemia spp. nauplii/individual/day). Mortality data was collected by counting the number of dead larvae daily, and metabolic rates were measured as oxygen consumption over a 20-minute period. Each was analyzed using a linear mixed effects model. For both responses, the interaction between pCO2 concentration and low feeding level had a significant effect (Mortality: p=0.0326, Metabolic Rate: p=0.0097), where metabolic rate was depressed, and mortality rates were elevated only under a combination of low food and high pCO2. The synergistic interaction of our two treatments for both mortality and metabolic rate is important to consider as food web dynamics shift in our changing oceans. If larval grunion mortality increases, this could have major implications throughout the trophic web, as adult grunion are an important forage fish species in coastal California ecosystems.
Long BeachStudent Travel Program2022-23 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
SheenaStephens2022-23Sean CraigCraig
19th International Bryozoology Association (IBA) Conference Dublin 2022​
GraduateSheena Stephens and Dr. Sean Craig
A review of contact dependent interactions among bryozoans​
We review the marine ecology literature focused on bryozoan interactions and discuss overgrowth, “stalemates,” upright bi-laminate growth and fusion in fossil and extant species. Competitive overgrowth, where one species grows zooids atop another, has received the most attention in the scientific literature. However, “stalemates,” where two colonies cease growth at the region of contact, has received relatively little attention; consideration of chemical warfare has almost been completely neglected. Upright bi-laminate growth following colony contact has also received little attention, but could reflect mutualistic behavior of encrusting species, allowing them to rise into the water column to increase feeding and reproduction. Fusion of self-self-contacts appears common, yet self-non-self-fusions forming natural chimeras also occurs and may represent cooperative behavior among genetically related individuals, enhancing reproduction. In-depth analyses of the costs and benefits of these contact-dependent behaviors is needed to further understand the abundance and diversity of bryozoan species in marine habitats.
HumboldtStudent Travel Program2022-23 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
Taylor (Z)Zenobia2022-23Jose Marin JarrinMarin Jarrin
Canadian and North American World Aquaculture Society Conference​
GraduateZ Zenobia*, Sarah Moreau, Rosa Laucci, Shawna McCovey, Kat Meyer,  James Ray, Megan Van Pelt, Jose Marin Jarrin
Co-Management and status of night smelt Sprinchus starksi in Northern California in 2021.​
Night smelt (Spirinchus starksi) occur from Central California to South East Alaska and spawn on the shore of sandy beach surf zones. This species is a vital part of regional food webs and in California, is fished commercially, recreationally and for subsistence, primarily in Humboldt and Del Norte counties. Night smelt are known as ch’uy-xee-ni in the Tolowaa Dee-ni’ Nations’ language. These fish are seen as an imperative part of the food resources for Indigenous tribal nations and have been documented as culturally significant to thirteen sovereign nations in the occupied north coast of California (Tolowa Dee-ni’ Nation, 2017). This species has been fished for subsistence and cultural purposes for time immemorial (Palmer et al. 2018). Despite the ecological, commercial and cultural importance of this species, very little is known about its biology and ecology. Consequently, there are currently no criteria to identify when this fishery is overfished or in decline. To study the status of these populations we collected adult night smelt with an A-frame net at six beaches in Humboldt and Del Norte counties once a month from March to September 2021. We then statistically compared length (mm, Total Length), weight (g) and sex ratio with data collected at the same beaches in 2014. We caught 529 fish on 9 of 35 days sampled in 2021. Length and weight averaged (±Standard Deviation) 11.7±0.8 cm TL and 10.4±1.9 g, and were significantly lower than 2014 values (12.2±6.0 cm TL, 11.5±2.5 g, respectively, p<0.01). Most of the fish were males (96%), which was slightly higher than during 2014 (93%, p<0.05). Our study suggests that at present Humboldt and Del Norte night smelt are smaller, lighter and more of them are males than almost a decade ago. These results suggest that these populations are in decline, potentially due to overfishing or unfavorable oceanographic conditions, and may require stricter regulations such as seasonal or annual closures.
HumboldtStudent Travel Program2022-23 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
collapse Year and Status : 2021-22 Undergraduate Student Travel Program Awards ‎(2)
  
KaitlinMacaranas2021-22Rae McNeishMcNeish
Joint Aquatic Sciences Meeting​
UndergraduateKaitlin Macaranas, Amy Fetters, Rae McNeish
Landscape features and atmospheric conditions alter microplastic and nutrient depositional patterns​​​​
Microplastics (particles < 5 mm) are persistent, anthropogenic pollutants of increasing concern in atmospheric, terrestrial, and freshwater systems due to proximity to, and frequency of, human activity. Recent studies suggest atmospheric processes facilitate the spread of microplastics across the landscape; therefore, it is important to understand how landscape features might affect microplastic abundance within these systems. We investigated microplastic and nutrient temporal abundance in connection to changes in atmospheric conditions (wet and dry deposition) and landscape features (forest and grassland). Preliminary results indicated that mean rainfall was significantly greater in the grassland (456 cm3) compared to the forest habitat (320 cm3; P < 0.01). Mean atmospheric wet deposition (472 particles/m2) and concentration (9.52 particles/L-1) of microplastics was greater in the forest compared to the grassland habitat (346 particles/m2; 4.78 particles/L-1), with clear and blue plastic microfibers the most common in both habitats. Nitrate (NO3–N), nitrite (NO2–N), ammonia (NH3–N), and orthophosphate (PO4-3) concentrations were greater in the forest compared to the grassland habitat for all parameters (NO3–N = 12.2 mg/L; NO2–N = 0.0672 mg/L; NH3–N = 4.56 mg/L PO4-3). These findings demonstrate precipitation as a significant pathway for microplastics into a diverse range of ecosystems and introduce landscape features as an additional factor influencing microplastic and nutrient abundances found in the environment.​
BakersfieldStudent Travel Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
EthanSwitzer2021-22Steve MooreMoore
Benthic Ecology Meeting 2022
UndergraduateEthan Switzer, Dr. Steve Moore, Maggie Seida, Ryan Solymar
Parallel Laser Measurement System for ROV-based 3D Photogrammetry of Maritime Heritage Sites for the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary​​
Detailed documentation of the 463 known maritime heritage sites within the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (MBNMS) is crucial for the effective management of the sites’ historical significance and the benthic communities they support. In previous research, 3D models generated using Structure-from-Motion photogrammetry from video have proven to be an effective tool for identification, quantification, and the precise location of sessile macroinvertebrates. Video captured by a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) allows for data collection in deep environments outside the limit for divers. One challenge with this method is accurately calibrating object size in the 3D model due to the lack of a reference scale within the captured video. The results of this engineering project include the design and programming of a self-contained parallel laser measurement system mounted to a small,
inexpensive ROV (BlueROV2, Bluerobotics.com) for accurate scaling of sessile macroinvertebrate communities in 3D photogrammetry models. Before use in the ocean, the laser system modification was evaluated and calibrated in a pool by recording objects of known dimensions to test the effectiveness of the reference scale in 3D modeling.​
Monterey BayStudent Travel Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Travel Program Awards
collapse Year and Status : 2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards ‎(103)
  
CrisilaAban2021-22Kevin HovelHovel
Undergraduate
The California spiny lobster’s prey-choice when presented with 3 ecological relevant prey species: A. senhousia, Mytilus species, and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus
San DiegoStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
DanielAguilar2021-22Jeremy ClaisseClaisse
Undergraduate
Assessing the variation in gut length among Garibaldi with comparison to other damselfish (Pomacentridae) and marine fish species​
PomonaStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
LinaAlegria2021-22Lani GleasonGleason
Undergraduate
Growth and survival of juvenile red abalone Haliotis rufescens in response to heat stress and starvation
SacramentoStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
PriscillaAlvarez2021-22Christine WhitcraftWhitcraft
Undergraduate
Seasonal variability in the diet of the federally endangered California least tern​
Long BeachStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
CassidyAndrasz2021-22Elena KeelingKeeling
Undergraduate
Analysis of gene expression investigating biology underlying high regenerative ability of marine invertebrate Botrylloides violaceus
San Luis ObispoStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
ArianaArias2021-22Dan ReinemanReineman
Undergraduate
Microplastics in SoCal sandy beaches​
Channel IslandsStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
MeganCanchola2021-22Matthew EdwardsEdwards
Undergraduate
The effects of nutrient concentration on nitrogen uptake in Ulva lactuca as it relates to bioremediation in coastal watersheds
San DiegoStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
DanielCarcamo2021-22Mark SteeleSteele
Undergraduate
Evaluating the nonconsumptive effects of giant sea bass​
NorthridgeStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
CodyCarlson2021-22Rafael Cuevas UribeCuevas Uribe
Undergraduate
Integrated multi-trophic aquaculture (IMTA)​
HumboldtStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
MarcosCarreon2021-22Amanpreet ManchandaManchanda
Undergraduate
Combating ocean acidification by use of silica nanotubes for carbon dioxide sorption​
StanislausStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
EloraChatain2021-22Sarah CohenCohen
Undergraduate
Investigation of pedicellariae distribution among genetic lineages of Leptasterias species
San FranciscoStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
LetaDawson2021-22Alison HauptHaupt
Undergraduate
Habitat cover and its effects on abalone populations​
Monterey BayStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
AliviaDe Luze2021-22Timothy DavidsonDavidson
Undergraduate
The effects of marine wood-borers on red mangrove (Rhizophora mangle) in native and non-native habitats
SacramentoStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
JacquesDescouts2021-22Tomas OppenheimOppenheim
Undergraduate
Oceanographic research buoy​
Maritime AcademyStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
NickEdholm2021-22Ryan PortnerPortner
Undergraduate
Investigation of fragmentation processes producing volcaniclastic deposits in deep marine environments​
San JoséStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
FelicityErikson2021-22Chris LoweLowe
Undergraduate
Drone pilot licensing​
Long BeachStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
YvannaEscobar2021-22Andres AguilarAguilar
Undergraduate
Sequencing and assembly of the Pacific sanddab genome​
Los AngelesStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
NicholasFelix2021-22Kristy ForsgrenForsgren
Undergraduate
Histopathology of flatfishes from Orange County Sanitation District reference and wastewater outfall sites​
FullertonStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
HannaFranklin2021-22Lani GleasonGleason
Undergraduate
Investigating the transcriptomic responses to heat stress and starvation in the economically important red abalone Haliotis rufescens
SacramentoStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
DianaGarcia2021-22Maya deVriesdeVries
Undergraduate
Sustainable shellfish in an acidified ocean​
San JoséStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
MiaGil2021-22Natalie MladenovMladenov
Undergraduate
Evaluating leaching and degradation of compounds from microfibers using fluorescence spectroscopy​
San DiegoStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
LizbethGonzales2021-22Jennifer BurnafordBurnaford
Undergraduate
Potential effects of COVID-related human activity on mussel population structure: comparisons between MPA and non-MPA shores​
FullertonStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
StuartGoran2021-22Tamara BarriquandBarriquand
Undergraduate
The effects of offshore upwelling on nearshore biological productivity off the Trinidad headline​
HumboldtStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
YugjeetGrewal2021-22Steve BlumenshineBlumenshine
Undergraduate
Estimating stable isotope incorporation rate in juvenile Chinook salmon​
FresnoStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
SofieGronborg Lund Hansen2021-22Mark SteeleSteele
Undergraduate
Management-based differences in the dietary niches of California reef fishes​
NorthridgeStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
LuisGutierrez2021-22Darcy TaniguchiTaniguchi
Undergraduate
Investigating biodiversity of marine protists off the California Coast and its relation to phytoplankton growth and grazing mortality rates​
San MarcosStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
SeanHaran2021-22Dan ReinemanReineman
Undergraduate
Surfers Point resource quality monitoring​
Channel IslandsStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
CaoilinnHardy2021-22Steve BlumenshineBlumenshine
Undergraduate
Chinook salmon conservation data analysis​
FresnoStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
JazmineHarvey2021-22Lani GleasonGleason
Undergraduate
Identifying population-specific DNA methylation patterns in the marine snail Tegula funebralis to examine thermal tolerance
SacramentoStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
KyleHebert2021-22Jennifer MurphyMurphy
Undergraduate
The relationship between ammonium concentrations and tidal current fluctuations through the Carquinez Strait: part 2​
Maritime AcademyStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
BriannaHerrera2021-22Danielle ZacherlZacherl
Undergraduate

Impact of varying substrates and human-activity levels on condition index of Ostrea lurida and Mytilus galloprovincialis

FullertonStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
JustinHertel2021-22Misty Paig-TranPaig-Tran
Undergraduate
Comparing methods of age determination in Sardinops sagax
FullertonStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
TiffanyHopkins2021-22Patty OikawaOikawa
Undergraduate
A study of the phenology of a tidal wetland system​
East BayStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
AndreaHoppe2021-22Sarah CohenCohen
Undergraduate
Observing the relationship between eelgrass pathogen density and temperature and salinity levels in Drakes Estero and Tomales Bay​
San FranciscoStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
JessicaHopper2021-22Ron ColemanColeman
Undergraduate
Otolith examination in striped bass​
SacramentoStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
  
KatieHoy2021-22Tamara BarriquandBarriquand
Undergraduate
The effects of offshore upwelling on nearshore biological productivity off the Trinidad headline​
HumboldtStudent Research Support Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Research Support Program Awards
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