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Past Student Awards

Use the filters below to find awards made to CSU students by Program, Campus, or Year. Go to Past Faculty Awards​​​​​. ​

 

COAST Award Program

 

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Year

 
  
  
  
  
  
  
Meeting
  
  
AwardTitle
Abstract
  
  
  
collapse Year and Status : 2021-22 Undergraduate Student Travel Program Awards ‎(2)
  
KaitlinMacaranas2021-22Rae McNeishMcNeish
Joint Aquatic Sciences Meeting​
UndergraduateKaitlin Macaranas, Amy Fetters, Rae McNeish
Landscape features and atmospheric conditions alter microplastic and nutrient depositional patterns​​​​
Microplastics (particles < 5 mm) are persistent, anthropogenic pollutants of increasing concern in atmospheric, terrestrial, and freshwater systems due to proximity to, and frequency of, human activity. Recent studies suggest atmospheric processes facilitate the spread of microplastics across the landscape; therefore, it is important to understand how landscape features might affect microplastic abundance within these systems. We investigated microplastic and nutrient temporal abundance in connection to changes in atmospheric conditions (wet and dry deposition) and landscape features (forest and grassland). Preliminary results indicated that mean rainfall was significantly greater in the grassland (456 cm3) compared to the forest habitat (320 cm3; P < 0.01). Mean atmospheric wet deposition (472 particles/m2) and concentration (9.52 particles/L-1) of microplastics was greater in the forest compared to the grassland habitat (346 particles/m2; 4.78 particles/L-1), with clear and blue plastic microfibers the most common in both habitats. Nitrate (NO3–N), nitrite (NO2–N), ammonia (NH3–N), and orthophosphate (PO4-3) concentrations were greater in the forest compared to the grassland habitat for all parameters (NO3–N = 12.2 mg/L; NO2–N = 0.0672 mg/L; NH3–N = 4.56 mg/L PO4-3). These findings demonstrate precipitation as a significant pathway for microplastics into a diverse range of ecosystems and introduce landscape features as an additional factor influencing microplastic and nutrient abundances found in the environment.​
BakersfieldStudent Travel Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
EthanSwitzer2021-22Steve MooreMoore
Benthic Ecology Meeting 2022
UndergraduateEthan Switzer, Dr. Steve Moore, Maggie Seida, Ryan Solymar
Parallel Laser Measurement System for ROV-based 3D Photogrammetry of Maritime Heritage Sites for the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary​​
Detailed documentation of the 463 known maritime heritage sites within the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (MBNMS) is crucial for the effective management of the sites’ historical significance and the benthic communities they support. In previous research, 3D models generated using Structure-from-Motion photogrammetry from video have proven to be an effective tool for identification, quantification, and the precise location of sessile macroinvertebrates. Video captured by a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) allows for data collection in deep environments outside the limit for divers. One challenge with this method is accurately calibrating object size in the 3D model due to the lack of a reference scale within the captured video. The results of this engineering project include the design and programming of a self-contained parallel laser measurement system mounted to a small,
inexpensive ROV (BlueROV2, Bluerobotics.com) for accurate scaling of sessile macroinvertebrate communities in 3D photogrammetry models. Before use in the ocean, the laser system modification was evaluated and calibrated in a pool by recording objects of known dimensions to test the effectiveness of the reference scale in 3D modeling.​
Monterey BayStudent Travel Program2021-22 Undergraduate Student Travel Program Awards
collapse Year and Status : 2021-22 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards ‎(10)
  
AnitaArenas2021-22Christine WhitcraftWhitcraft
Joint Aquatic Sciences Meeting
GraduateAnita Arenas
Effects of Iris pseudacorus on abiotic conditions, plant and invertebrate communities in a Southern California Estuary​​
Despite the recognized importance of wetlands, about 90% of wetlands have been lost in California. Of the remaining wetlands, many are degraded by invasive species. Iris pseudacorus (IRPS, yellow flag iris) is one such non-native species that has been introduced to wetlands. Los Peñasquitos Lagoon, in north County San Diego, has been invaded by IRPS in freshwater (FW), brackish (BW), and marine (MW) areas of the wetland. Our objective was to determine if IRPS impacts abiotic conditions and the invertebrate community using a paired design. Preliminary data show that aerial insect communities, via sticky traps, showed no significant difference in abundance between IRPS and non-IRPS canopies in the FW and BW sites, but at the MW site, there was higher abundance of aerial insects in IRPS relative to non-IRPS. The aerial insect community composition differed significantly among sites with more Culicidae and Muscidae in FW sites, higher Agromyzidae in BW sites, and higher Thysanoptera in the MW site. Decomposition rate showed a significant interaction of salinity area and decomposition material type. In the BW site, non-IRPS decomposition material decomposed faster as compared to IRPS decomposition material with higher rates under non-IRPS canopies. In the FW site, the opposite was true with faster decomposition of IRPS material than non-IRPS material.  By exploring the impacts of IRPS on abiotic parameters as well as on the insect community, this study will help inform and prioritize management strategies by determining extent of impacts and most impacted locations.
Long BeachStudent Travel Program2021-22 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
EmmaDebasitis2021-22John OlsonOlson
Joint Aquatic Sciences Meeting
GraduateEmma Debasitis, John Olson, Janet Walker, Raphael Mazor
Estimating Natural Background Water Quality in California Rivers​
Water chemistry affects organisms at all levels of the food web. Water quality alteration from natural conditions can seriously degrade habitat quality, survival of native species, and human health. Estimating background water quality of impaired streams can be difficult due to the effects of anthropogenic involvement in the aquatic systems over decades to centuries. To better understand baseline water chemistry levels, we created random forest models for ionic and integrated water quality parameters, including chloride, calcium, TDS, specific conductivity, magnesium, hardness, sulfate, sodium, and alkalinity. Water quality measurements from minimally impaired reference sites across the United States were used as  response variables for model training. We developed these models using both static (i.e., geology, soils, etc.) and dynamic (i.e., monthly evapotranspiration, precipitation, and temperature) EPA StreamCat predictor variables. Chloride and magnesium models both explained 85% of the variation with RMSE values of 2.02 and 3.67 mg/L, respectively. The top predictors across models include sulfur in the watershed/catchment, annual precipitation, and aluminum oxide in the watershed. The baseline water chemistry estimates produced by these models will assist California establish site specific water quality standards and manage habitat in various situations, including urban development projects, habitat restoration, and endangered species monitoring. ​
Monterey BayStudent Travel Program2021-22 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
AmyFetters2021-22Rae McNeishMcNeish
Joint Aquatic Sciences Meeting​
GraduateAK Fetters and RE McNeish
Spa​tial variation of riverine anthropogenic litter and microplastics is connected to bridges and debris dams​​​
Plastic pollution is a pervasive contaminant of concern worldwide. Historically, research on anthropogenic litter (AL) and microplastics (particles &lt; 5mm) focused on the abundance of these contaminants in marine habitats. Rivers are recognized as major sources of marine debris; therefore, research is needed to understand the pathways of AL and microplastic transport in freshwater systems. Architectural additions to rivers have the potential to impact flow patterns and promote the formation of debris dams (DD) due to organic and anthropogenic debris buildup, potentially altering the availability of materials to downstream habitats. In this study, we investigated how a road bridge with DD formed on piers impacted the abundance and distribution of AL and microplastics in the Kern River, CA USA. Microplastic and AL samples were collected in the riverbed upstream and downstream (n = 3 transects location -1 ) of the bridge and at bridge piers with and without DD present (n = 5 dam pairs). Preliminary results indicated that DD contained the highest AL density (P &lt; 0.05) and the highest relative abundance of plastic items (P &lt; 0.05) compared to other sampling locations. Additionally, DD were most likely to capture more flexible AL items compared to rigid items (P &lt; 0.05), suggesting that DD may selectively capture AL based on structural integrity. These findings suggest that anthropogenic bridges may 1) impact the abundance, composition, and spatial distribution of AL in rivers, and 2) serve as hotspots for DD and AL that can be targeted for management efforts focused on AL removal.

BakersfieldStudent Travel Program2021-22 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
EmilyLadin2021-22Larry AllenAllen
Joint Meeting of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists
Graduate
​​Developm​ental Ontogeny of Giant Sea Bass, Stereolepis gigas
Giant Sea Bass, Stereolepis gigas, is listed as critically endangered by the IUCN, and is the largest bony fish off the coast of Southern California. After fertilization, Giant Sea Bass larvae develop in the plankton and eventually settle to a sandy bottom habitat, but little is known about their early life history stages or what mechanisms drive this transition. This study aims to examine, in detail, the first critical stages of this species including the egg, yolk sac, pre-flexion, flexion, post-flexion, and the transformation stages. Laboratory reared specimens were culled throughout development and preserved, the fixed larvae then had their cartilage stained with alcian blue. Following the staining of cartilage, bone was stained using alizarin red. Osteological development will now be analyzed amongst the different sized larvae. Knowledge of these developmental stages will give us a better understanding of what is driving Giant Sea Bass larval recruitment, thus allowing better protection of nursery areas and rational fisheries management.​​
NorthridgeStudent Travel Program2021-22 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
ShawnMelendy2021-22John OlsonOlson
Joint Aquatic Sciences Meeting​
GraduateShawn A. Melendy & John R. Olson
Can Environmental DNA Reveal Fish Abundance? Modeling Salmonid eDNA Fate at the Reach Scale​​​
Environmental DNA (eDNA) has emerged as a promising new method for the detection and, potentially, quantification of freshwater organisms. To quantify organisms, either by biomass or enumeration, our understanding of both eDNA shedding rates and eDNA fate (transport, degradation, settling, resuspension) must be improved. To address the later, we characterized how salmonid eDNA fate varies with environment at the reach-scale. At eight river sites across the central California coast, we added a known quantity of novel eDNA (Brook Trout, Salvelinus fontinalis) and then collected eDNA at sequential downstream distances for qPCR analysis. We then modeled the rate of eDNA loss as a function of river characteristics, including discharge, width, depth, slope, substrate cobble size, presence of organic matter, biofilm thickness, and water chemistry. To increase the variety of eDNA fate profiles (the complete set of environmental and anthropogenic factors relevant to eDNA fate at a given site), we selected study sites representing a wide range of sizes, climatic settings, and amounts of anthropogenic impact. Our resulting models will predict salmonid eDNA fate at the reach-scale with novel precision and describe the relative impacts of river characteristics on eDNA fate. Additionally, our results will offer an approach for characterizing reach-specific eDNA fate profiles and potentially reveal the extent to which eDNA fate profiles vary across natural and human impact gradients. This understanding will lay the groundwork for eDNA-based quantification of salmon, while improving knowledge of eDNA detection probabilities across river taxa.
Monterey BayStudent Travel Program2021-22 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
PeterNilsson2021-22Bruno PernetPernet
Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology Annual Meeting 2022
GraduatePeter Nilsson, Bruno Pernet
Echinoid larvae express food-conditioned morphological plasticity at ecologically relevant culture densities​
The feeding larvae of many echinoids develop longer postoral arms relative to body size when food is sparse but shorter arms when food is abundant, a response thought to adaptively adjust feeding ability. However, Kacenas & Podolsky (2018) found that larvae of the sand dollar Dendraster excentricus only exhibited this food-conditioned plasticity when reared at the high larval densities typical of laboratory cultures; when reared at a lower density more representative of field observations of plankton, larvae did not exhibit this plastic response. This suggests that phenotypically plastic responses to food abundance – a major focus in larval biology for the past three decades – may actually be rare in nature. We replicated Kacenas & Podolsky’s study and extended it to a lower culture density as well as a to second echinoid, Lytechinus pictus. Larvae of D. excentricus developed longer postoral arms relative to body size when fed the lower food ration at all culture densities, though these differences were not significant for the lower density in one experiment. Larvae of L. pictus likewise developed relatively longer postoral arms at lower food rations, though these differences did not reach statistical significance at any culture density. Consistent with prior work demonstrating phenotypic plasticity, postoral arm length appeared to be negatively correlated with stomach length in all of our experiments. That the feeding larvae of echinoids can exhibit plasticity of feeding structures even at very low culture densities suggests that this plastic response may occur in nature, where larval densities are generally thought to be extremely low.
Long BeachStudent Travel Program2021-22 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
GeorgetOraha2021-22Jennifer BurnafordBurnaford
Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics & Native Americans in Science
GraduateGeorget Oraha, Jennifer L. Burnaford
Hanging by a thread: Investigating the effects of low tide temperature on mussel attachment strength​
Mytilus californianus, the California mussel, is a foundation species and dominant space-holder in the rocky intertidal zone, an environment that goes through extreme temperature shifts on a daily basis as organisms are submerged in seawater during high tide and exposed to terrestrial conditions during low tide. Mussels create protein ‘anchors’ called byssal threads that allow them to attach to rocks and each other. Previous work has examined how wave action negatively affects mussel attachment. Yet to date, few studies have addressed the role of temperature during low tide on attachment strength of mussels, despite the clear importance of this topic in the context of the rising temperatures predicted with a changing climate. We used laboratory manipulations to investigate how temperature during low-tide affects three components of mussel attachment: byssal thread production, individual mussel attachment strength, and single byssal thread strength. We collected mussels from two southern California field sites and set up a fully factorial seven-day experiment with two types of treatments: number of low tide exposures (exposure on the first day followed by six days of submersion or exposure each day for seven days) and temperature during low tide exposure (ambient or elevated temperature). In the elevated temperature treatment, we used small heaters to individually raise body temperatures by XoC.We predicted and have found that mussels exposed to natural ambient treatments generally have greater individual mussel attachment strength and single byssal thread strength than mussels exposed to elevated temperatures.
FullertonStudent Travel Program2021-22 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
BridgetSteiner2021-22Bruno PernetPernet
Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology Annual Meeting 2022​
GraduateSteiner, BM; Pernet, B
Variable expression of food-conditioned phenotypic plasticity in feeding larvae of diverse echinoderms​​
Feeding larvae of echinoderms take two distinct forms: pluteus (echinoids, ophiuroids) and dipleurula (asteroids, holothuroids). Plutei fed low food rations often develop longer ciliary bands relative to body size than those fed high rations, but it is unclear how widespread phenotypic plasticity is in dipleurulae. Further, comparisons among taxa are difficult since prior studies vary in methods. Here we apply uniform methods to study phenotypic plasticity in larvae of four echinoderm classes. For each species, larvae of four replicate families were reared at 0.25 larvae ml-1 and fed low (1000 cells ml-1 Rhodomonas lens) or high (6000 cells ml-1) food rations. We measured body length (BL) and the length of the feeding ciliary band (CBL) at three developmental stages. CBL was measured in three dimensions from stacks of images, a method not previously applied to dipleurulae. Within species, we compared the ratio of CBL/BL between food rations. Plutei of two of three echinoids showed evidence of plasticity. Dipleurulae of the two asteroids showed no evidence of plasticity, but the dipleurula of the holothuroid did. We found no plasticity in pre-feeding stages of any species. The expression of plasticity in our study was surprisingly variable. This may be due to our moderate contrast in food levels. Prior studies have often used stronger contrasts in food level, sometimes including treatments with extremely low or even no food. Such extremely low food levels are probably relatively rare in nature, which raises questions about the frequency of expression of phenotypic plasticity in the field.​
Long BeachStudent Travel Program2021-22 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
MichelleTarian2021-22John OlsonOlson
Joint Aquatic Sciences Meeting​
GraduateMichelle Tarian, John R. Olson
P​redicting fish assemblages in California estuaries using random forest modeling​​​​​
Estuaries are critical habitat for many fish species in California, including Salmon, Steelhead, and Tide Water Gobi. These habitats include tidal inlet bar-built estuaries which are common along the coast of California and are important to coastal sediment balance and estuarine ecosystems. Bar-built estuaries are often managed by breaching sandbars, but the timing of when this is done is guided only by conventional wisdom. To understand how the fish assemblage changes in response to chemical and physical changes in the estuary, including opening of sandbars, we modeled fish responses in the Russian River Estuary in Central California using random forest. Using both environmental factors and abundance of other fish as predictors, we developed models successfully predicting presence/absence of 5 fish species with AUCs between 0.74-0.90 and models predicting abundances with RMSE between 0.03 – 0.46. We found that fish assemblages were most influenced by both local and upstream water chemistry and temperature, day of the year, and location in the estuary. Sandbar status (open/closed) had limited predictive ability. These models can be applied to predicting spatial and temporal variation in fish assemblages, providing mangers with data driven guidance for timely management actions. These models will also be used to develop the Aquatic Species Assessment Tool (ASAT), which aims to capture the complexity of species-habitat interactions in a simple end-user interface and will eventually be applied to estuaries throughout California.
Monterey BayStudent Travel Program2021-22 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
  
BlairWinnacott2021-22Eric BjorkstedtBjorkstedt
American Fisheries Society​
GraduateBlair M. Winnacott, Eric P. Bjorkstedt
Persistent structure and sharp transitions in larval fish assemblages off northern California: Analysis of a 12-year ichthyoplankton time series along the Trinidad Head Line
We identified larval fishes collected along the Trinidad Head Line from late 2007 through 2019, augmenting visual analysis with genetic identification of visually cryptic larval rockfishes (Sebastes spp.), to characterize variability in the ichthyoplankton assemblage in coastal waters off northern California. While cross-shelf structure and seasonal patterns in species’ abundance were generally consistent with the distribution and phenology of parental stocks, interannual variability in assemblage structure responded strongly to basin scale climate forcing. Specifically, a sharp and persistent increase in the overall abundance of larval fishes (despite declines in a few species with cool-water affinities) and species richness coincided with an unprecedented marine heatwave (MHW) that manifested first with the arrival of the “Warm Blob” in coastal waters in late 2014 and was subsequently reinforced by a strong El Niño event in 2015-16. During this event, several rare or previously unrecorded taxa occurred in our collections. Our observations suggest onshore advection of larvae of oceanic species and reduced offshore dispersion of coastal species’ larvae, but the starkest changes in assemblage structure appear to be associated with poleward shifts in the spawning distribution of adult stocks marked by the appearance (at high abundance) of several species that typically spawn well to the south of our sampling region (e.g., Genyonemus lineatus, Merluccius productus, and Sardinops sagax). Resolving aggregate Sebastes to species highlights similar patterns, including the arrival of new species (e.g., Sebastes jordani) with the 2015-16 El Niño that would have otherwise gone undetected. These results lay the foundation for extending the use of larval fish assemblages as indicators of ecosystem responses to climate forcing in this important transitional region of the California Current.​
HumboldtStudent Travel Program2021-22 Graduate Student Travel Program Awards
collapse Year and Status : 2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards ‎(46)
  
AnitaArenas2021-22Christine WhitcraftWhitcraft
Graduate
Ecology of Iris pseudacorus in Its Non-native Range and Effects on Invertebrate Communities in a Southern California Estuary
Long BeachStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
KarinaArzuyan2021-22Matthew EdwardsEdwards
Graduate
Effects of associated macroalgae on rhodolith (Lithotha​mnion australe) conditions in the time of climate change​​
San DiegoStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
TaylorAzizeh2021-22Birgitte McDonaldMcDonald
Graduate
Using fine-scale data to understand the foraging ecology of late chick-rearing emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri) at Cap​e Crozier, Antarctica​​​​​​
San JoséStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
LilamarieBowen2021-22Daniel BartonBarton
Graduate
The impacts and interactions of human disturbance on reproductive success in Western Gulls​​​​
HumboldtStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
MarinaBozinovic2021-22Ellen HinesHines
Graduate
​Applying Passive Acoustic Monitoring to Address Spatial Risk Management of Baleen Whales in Greater Farallones and Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuaries​​​​​
San FranciscoStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
BrendaCalderon2021-22Jeremy ClaisseClaisse
Graduate
Spatial and habitat variation in diet composition and associated life history patterns of Garibaldi in t​​​he Southern California Bight​​​​​
PomonaStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
FionaConnor2021-22Eileen CashmanCashman
Graduate
Investigating the effectiveness of microplastic removal and the relationship between microplastics, microbial communities, and nitrogen in the natural treatment systems at the Arcata Wastewater Treatment Facility​​​
HumboldtStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
JackCorso2021-22Peter EdmundsEdmunds
Graduate
Coral-algal Competitive Interactions within Marginal Reef Environments​​​​
NorthridgeStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
BasilDarby2021-22Thomas ConnollyConnolly
Graduate
Impact of Submesoscale Coherent Structures on Vertical Motion and Horizontal Transport Along the Coast of Northern California​​​​​
San JoséStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
KathleenElder2021-22Tim BeanBean
Graduate
Marine resource use by terrestrial mammals in island vs mainland coastal ecosystems​​​​
San Luis ObispoStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
AnabellEspinosa Pico2021-22Ryan WalterWalter
Graduate
Cranial Variation on California Pipefishes​​​
FullertonStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
JesseEspinoza2021-22Sarah CohenCohen
Graduate
Assessing the Stress and Recovery of Algal Symbionts in Host Anemones Experiencing Salinity and Temperature Fluctuations in the Temperate Intertidal​​​​
San FranciscoStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
MarziaFattori2021-22Rafael Cuevas UribeCuevas Uribe
Graduate
Effect of temperature on recruitment and growth of Bull kelp seeded on gravel, and growth comparison between two substrates to test for effectiveness as restoration methods.​​
HumboldtStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
KatrinaGiambertone2021-22Cheryl LoganLogan
Graduate
Exploring mechanisms of coral thermal tolerance in Galápagos Pocillopora colonies​​
Monterey BayStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
JasonGonsalves2021-22Thomas ConnollyConnolly
Graduate
Quantifying Oceanographic and Atmospheric Drivers of Island Mass Effect Within the Phoenix Islands Protected Area​
San JoséStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
LoganGrady2021-22Thomas ConnollyConnolly
Graduate
Wave-Driven Kelp Wake as a Mechanism for Vertical Mixing within a Kelp Forest off of Monterey Peninsula​​​​
San JoséStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
KeenanGuillas2021-22Amanda KahnKahn
Graduate
The behaviour and energetics of demosponges in response to suspended sediments​​​​​​
San JoséStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
RoseHarman2021-22Paul BourdeauBourdeau
Graduate
The influence of environmental forcing on predator-prey interactions in nearshore ecosystems: leopard shark (Triakis semifasciata) foraging in Humboldt Bay​​​​
HumboldtStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
UlyssesHernandez2021-22Elizabeth TorresTorres
Graduate
​Targeted eDNA detection and DNA metabarcoding of California marine ostracod crustaceans​​​​​
Los AngelesStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
KellyHollman2021-22Natalie MladenovMladenov
Graduate
​Photoirradiation and degradation kinetics of microfiber leachates​​​
San DiegoStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
ElizabethJahn2021-22Christopher LoweLowe
Graduate
Density and abundance of juvenile white shark (Carcharodon carcharias) prey species along the beaches of Southern California​​​
Long BeachStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
HannahJoss2021-22James GrahamGraham
Graduate
Monitoring bull kelp canopy at high spatial resolutions along the northern-most coast of California​​​
HumboldtStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
JamieKerlin2021-22Nyssa SilbigerSilbiger
Graduate
Direct and indirect effects of disturbance and neighborhood on coral growth rate and survivorship​​​​
NorthridgeStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
MatthewKim2021-22Jeremy ClaisseClaisse
Graduate
Using industry ROV footage to analyze fish assemblages associated with subsea oil and gas pipelines in southern California​​​
PomonaStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
JuhiLaFuente2021-22Eric BjorkstedtBjorkstedt
Graduate
​Multiple Stressor Impacts on Survival and Growth of North Pacific Krill (Euphausia pacifica) in the California Current Ecosystem​​​
HumboldtStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
MarineLebrec2021-22Maxime GrandGrand
Graduate
Automated Nutrient Analysis via Programmable Flow Injection: From Benchtop to Unattended Operation at Shore Stations​​​​​
San JoséStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
ArianaLee2021-22Douglas PacePace
Graduate
Assessing the phenotypic plasticity response in low-fed larvae of Dendraster excentricus when switched to high food conditions​​​
Long BeachStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
TravisLeggett2021-22James LindholmLindholm
Graduate
The Influence of Reef Connectivity on Urchin and Kelp Populations Near a Submarine Canyon in Carmel Bay, California, USA​​​
Monterey BayStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
ParkerLund2021-22Catalina Cuellar-GempelerCuellar-Gempeler
Graduate
Invasive Anemones Buffer Host-Associated Microbiota Against Thermal Stress​
HumboldtStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
SergioMadrigal Mora2021-22Christopher LoweLowe
Graduate
The dynamics of Pacific nurse shark aggregations under seasonally fluctuating water temperatures​​​​​​​
Long BeachStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
JessiaMetter2021-22Maxime GrandGrand
Graduate
Methane reduction or ozone depletion? Estimating the environmental impact of growing large quantities of Asparagopsis​ for cattle consumption​​
San JoséStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
MollyMurphy2021-22Heather LiwanagLiwanag
Graduate
Mom, is that you? A northern elephant seal pup’s ability to vocally recognize its mother in a densely populated rookery​
San Luis ObispoStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
TaylorNaquin2021-22Jennifer BurnafordBurnaford
Graduate
Spatial distribution of tissue chemistry in intertidal brown algae​​​​
FullertonStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
BenjaminNguyen2021-22Darren JohnsonJohnson
Graduate
Natural Selection on Personality Variation of a Marine Snail​​​
Long BeachStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
EmmaNicholson2021-22Birgitte McDonaldMcDonald
Graduate
Usage of a Unique California Wetland: Harbor Seal (Phoca vitulina) Population Patterns in Elkhorn Slough, CA​​​
San JoséStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
RobynNorman2021-22Dawn GoleyGoley
Graduate
Characterizing the habitat use of gray whales (Eschrichtius robustus) and the temporal and spatial variation of their invertebrate prey base​​​
HumboldtStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
ErickOrtiz2021-22Michelle JungbluthJungbluth
Graduate
Characterizing the diversity and food web support provided by microorganisms to native fishes in restored wetlands​​​​
San FranciscoStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
  
AmyParsons2021-22Scott ShafferShaffer
Graduate
​Characterizing the influence of urbanization on California gull (Larus californicus) microbiomes
San JoséStudent Research Program2021-22 Graduate Student Research Program Awards
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