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CSU-Creates-Unified-General-Education-Pathway-for-All-Students.aspx
  
4/17/2024 10:00 AMThropay, Janessa4/17/20244/17/2024 4:05 PMNew, simplified lower-division GE requirements will take effect in fall 2025.Student SuccessPress Release

The California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees has approved an amendment to Title 5 of the California Code of Regulations that will create a singular general education (GE) pattern for all CSU undergraduates. This change—voted on in March and effective in fall 2025—will create a clear and consistent set of requirements for all future CSU students pursuing a bachelor's degree.

The updated CSU GE aligns with the units and learning areas of the new Cal-GETC (California General Education Transfer Curriculum). Cal-GETC will be the singular GE pattern offered at California Community Colleges (CCC) and becomes the single pattern for transfer to either the CSU or University of California (UC). The change to CSU GE was necessary to ensure that all undergraduate students, regardless of how they enter the CSU, whether as first-time, first-year students or as transfers, have the same lower-division GE requirements. Starting in fall 2025, students who complete the CSU GE or Cal-GETC curriculum will satisfy their lower-division GE requirements at any CSU campus.

“Aligning general education for all students provides an equitable set of degree requirements and will provide a clear roadmap for all undergraduates who pursue a CSU baccalaureate degree," said Nathan Evans, deputy vice chancellor of CSU Academic and Student Affairs. “These changes also meet the objective of California's Student Transfer Achievement Reform (STAR) Act of 2021 by simplifying what can be often a challenging process for students crafting their degree plan and transferring credit."

Recognizing that more than half of first-time, first-year students arrive to the CSU with college credit through dual enrollment programs at California Community Colleges or through examinations, the Chancellor's Office recommended that the Board of Trustees approve the creation of a unified GE pattern for all CSU students.

The new CSU GE mirrors the five-fewer unit requirements of Cal-GETC but neither CSU GE nor Cal-GETC affects the total 120 units required to earn a CSU bachelor's degree.

The CSU Chancellor's Office will continue to work closely with the 23 universities to ensure implementation of the updates to CSU GE by fall 2025. More than $4 million has been committed to support campus implementation of the policy changes.  

Learn more by visiting the CSU's Unified General Education Pathway website.



About the California State University 

The California State University is the nation's largest four-year public university system, providing transformational opportunities for upward mobility to more than 450,000 students from all socioeconomic backgrounds. More than half of CSU students are people of color, and nearly one-third of them are first-generation college students. Because the CSU's 23 universities provide a high-quality education at an incredible value, they are rated among the best in the nation for promoting social mobility in national college rankings from U.S. News & World Report, the Wall Street Journal and Washington Monthly. The CSU powers California and the nation, sending nearly 127,000 career-ready graduates into the workforce each year. In fact, one in every 20 Americans holding a college degree earned it at the CSU. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU newsroom. 

Student wearing a backpack walking through campus with his back facing us surrounded by other students.
CSU Creates Unified General Education Pathway for All Students
CSU-Hill-Day-2024.aspx
  
4/18/2024 3:37 PMRuble, Alisia4/16/20244/16/2024 12:00 PMUniversity and student leaders helped advance federal priorities to double Pell, increase aid to Minority-Serving Institutions and protect Dreamers.LeadershipStory

Coinciding with the arrival of Washington, D.C.'s famous spring blooms, a group of California State University delegates gathered in our nation's capital last week to help advance top federal priorities as part of annual Hill Day events coordinated by the CSU Office of Federal Relations.

The delegation, made up of CSU students, alumni, staff, trustees and leadership, met with federal leaders and legislators including Acting Labor Secretary Julie Su and Representatives Nannette Barragan, Judy Chu and Ted Lieu to advocate on behalf of current and future college students.

Their conversations centered on the need to double the maximum Pell Grant, increase aid to Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs)—particularly Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) and Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions (AANAPISIs)—and find a bipartisan pathway to citizenship and federal financial assistance for Dreamers and DACA recipients.

At a Hill Day kick-off reception, CSU Chancellor Mildred García participated in a panel discussion on the higher education policy in Washington,​ D.C. alongside American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) President Charles Welch and Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) President Mark Becker. Assistant Secretary for Postsecondary Education Nasser Paydar gave a keynote address at the event.

García delivered an invigorating call to CSU legislative liaisons and advocates during the event and outlined the university's federal priorities, stating that doubling the maximum Pell Grant “will ensure that the great American success story will continue to be written for future generations of CSU students."

Approximately 208,000 CSU students rely on Pell Grants to be able to attend college and more than 64,000 CSU Pell recipients earned bachelor's degrees in 2021-22—about 58% of the total graduating class.

The chancellor also reminded representatives that, as one of the nation's most diverse four-year public university's system, the CSU is often looked at as a model in providing opportunities for upward mobility to students from all backgrounds. Twenty-one of the CSU's 23 universities are designated as HSIs, and more than half are AANAPISIs.

“Serving students of color is core to the CSU's mission," García said. “Many of our innovations in academic programming and student support services to advance this priority have become national models. Additional funding will help us continue to set the bar, raise graduation rates and lead the nation in our work to eliminate equity gaps for these historically underrepresented student populations."

García and Chair of the CSU Board of Trustees Wenda Fong attended several events throughout the week, including a lunch with members of the California Democratic Party during which García gave remarks about the importance and uniqueness of the CSU. Additionally, García gave the opening remarks at an event on social mobility hosted by Representative Scott Peters and CSU San Marcos President Ellen Neufeldt. 

CSU leaders also attended the CSU Alumni and Congressional Community Reception, which included CSU alumni, elected officials and members of the California Congressional Delegation and Department of Health and Human Services officials.

About 300 people ​attended the event, which served as an opportunity for CSU alumni living in the D.C. area and members of the congressional community to welcome Chancellor García to the university, network with one another and reconnect with their campus.

 

Explore photos and social media posts from​ Hill Day events.

greg saks, Dominic Quan Treseler, mildred garcia, ted lieu, wenda fong, beth steffel
CSU Leaders Seek More Federal Support for College Students During ‘Hill Day’
CSU-Bakersfield-Presidential-Search-Committee-to-Hold-Open-Forum.aspx
  
4/15/2024 11:46 AMThropay, Janessa4/15/20244/15/2024 9:40 AMThe California State University Board of Trustees is beginning the search for the next regularly appointed president of California State University, Bakersfield.LeadershipPress Release

The California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees is beginning the search for the next regularly appointed president of California State University, Bakersfield, following the retirement of Dr. Lynnette Zelezny in December 2023. Dr. Vernon B. Harper Jr. is currently serving as interim president.  

The first meeting of the Trustees' Committee for the Selection of the President will be held in a hybrid in-person/virtual open forum from 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 23, at the Solario de Fortaleza in the Student Recreation Center on campus. During this time, the committee will outline the search process and faculty, staff, students, alumni and members of the Bakersfield community will be invited to share their preferred attributes of the next president of CSU Bakersfield. 

CSU Trustee Douglas Faigin will chair the search committee. The other trustee members who will serve on the committee include Chair Wenda Fong, Vice Chair Jack B. Clarke Jr., Raji Kaur Brar, Jonathan Molina Mancio and CSU Chancellor Mildred García. 

Board policy requires the chair of the CSU Board of Trustees to appoint an Advisory Committee to the Trustees' Committee. The Advisory Committee is composed of representatives from the faculty, staff, students and alumni, as well as a member of a campus advisory board, all of whom are selected by the campus's constituency groups. Also on the Advisory Committee is a vice president or academic dean from the campus, and a president of another CSU campus—both selected by the chancellor. Both committees function as one unified group. 

Members of the Advisory Committee for the Selection of the President include:​

  • Aaron Hegde, Ph.D., chair, Academic Senate 

  • Melissa Danforth, Ph.D., professor, Computer and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and Tracey Salisbury, Ph.D., department chair, Ethnic Studies, and associate professor, Black Studies (faculty representatives)  

  • Yvette Morones, advising center coordinator, Social Sciences and Education (staff representative) 

  • Daisy Alamillo and Erin Pruitt (student representatives)  

  • Andres Chavez (alumni representative) 

  • Connie Perez-Andreesen (CSUB Foundation Board representative) 

  • Emily Duran and Katie Russell (community representatives)  

  • Thomas D. Wallace, Ph.D., vice president, Student Affairs (administration representative)  

  • Thomas A. Parham, Ph.D. president, California State University, Dominguez Hills (CSU president representative) 

Over the next several months, the committee will review candidates and conduct interviews, with the announcement of CSUB’s next president made during the Board of Trustees meeting in September.  

Campus and community members wishing to attend the open forum in person and address the committee do not have to register to do so. However advanced registration is required for those who wish to speak using the open forum’s virtual option. A registration link is provided on the CSUB President Search website (www.csub.edu/presidential-search). Confirmed registrants will receive details about how to participate.  

The deadline to register to speak remotely during the open forum is Monday, April 22 at 5 p.m. Confirmed registrants will receive details about how to participate. 

The virtual open forum will be web-streamed live and then archived on the CSUB President Search website. On the site, individuals can also learn about the search process, take a stakeholder survey, nominate someone for the position, and review the presidential profile once completed.



About the California State University 

The California State University is the nation's largest four-year public university system, providing transformational opportunities for upward mobility to more than 450,000 students from all socioeconomic backgrounds. More than half of CSU students are people of color, and nearly one-third of them are first-generation college students. Because the CSU's 23 universities provide a high-quality education at an incredible value, they are rated among the best in the nation for promoting social mobility in national college rankings from U.S. News & World Report, the Wall Street Journal and Washington Monthly. The CSU powers California and the nation, sending nearly 127,000 career-ready graduates into the workforce each year. In fact, one in every 20 Americans holding a college degree earned it at the CSU. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU newsroom.​

An image of the CSU Bakersfield campus sign.
California State University, Bakersfield Presidential Search Committee to Hold Open Forum
Seven-CSUs-Hold-Prestigious-Research-Designation.aspx
  
4/15/2024 9:14 AMBeall, Alex4/10/20244/10/2024 9:55 AMThe R2 Classification of the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education denotes doctoral universities with high levels of research activity.ResearchStory

The Doctoral University: High Research Activity, or R2, classification, of the prestigious Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education recognizes universities that award doctoral degrees for conducting high levels of research. Currently, seven CSUs hold this status: East Bay, Fresno, Fullerton, Long Beach, San Bernardino, San Diego and San Francisco.

“Earning the R2 Classification is a point of pride for our CSU campuses," says Ganesh Raman, CSU assistant vice chancellor for Research. “Having high-level research at the CSU gives students unique opportunities for experiential, hands-on learning that will prepare them for graduate education and their future careers. In addition, the classification helps universities attract and retain high-quality faculty as they are able to continue their professional scholarship while training students in the research process."

To achieve the classification, universities must award at least 20 doctoral degrees, as reported to the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System, and have at least $5 million in total research expenditures, as reported through the National Science Foundation's Higher Education Research & Development Survey. Universities that receive the designation are also considered national universities rather than regional universities in college rankings.

San Diego State first earned the designation in 2007 and San Francisco​ State in 2016. East Bay, Fresno, Fullerton, Long Beach and San Bernardino earned the status for the first time during the most recent update in 2022.

The Cal State San Bernardino College of Education, which houses the university's only doctoral program, helped elevate CSUSB to R2 status that year.

“The new designation as an R2 reflects the dedication and determination of our faculty, staff and administrators to develop and offer programs and research opportunities to benefit and advance our students as they pursue their educational goals and dreams, and ultimately help them advance in their careers," CSUSB President Tomás D. Morales said.

A growth in research activities related to education, science and health and human services catapulted Cal State East Bay to the R2 level in 2022.

“The recognition as a doctoral high-​research institution validates how the university has an essential role in the East Bay, California and beyond," CSUEB President Cathy Sandeen said. “The direct impact of the research activity conducted by our faculty and students provides meaningful solutions toward a more healthy and vibrant region. This Carnegie Classification is a proud moment for Cal State East Bay."

For Fresno State, obtaining the classification involved awarding 76 doctoral degrees and spending almost $35 million on research expenditures during the 2020-2021 academic year. Subsequently, the university awarded 73 doctoral degrees during the 2021-2022 academic year and 66 during the 2022-2023 academic year.

“The R2 designation recognizes the hard work of our faculty, staff and administrators and their grant writing, submission and research award activity on our campus," said Joy Goto, interim dean of the Division of Research and Graduate Studies at Fresno State. “Our research activities also represent many grants and contracts that advance our scholarly and creative work with our community, region and international collaborations."

To receive the designation for the first time, Cal State Fullerton awarded 67 doctoral degrees during the 2020-2021 academic year and had research and development expenditures of $5.9 million in 2020. The university's research expenditures increased to $9 million by 2021. CSUF since awarded 80 doctoral degrees during the 2021-2022 academic year and 83 during the 2022-2023 academic year.

“Cal State Fullerton's designation as an R2 university signifies our commitment to research excellence and our abundant opportunities for students and faculty to engage in cutting-edge scholarship," CSUF President Sylvia Alva said. “The discovery that comes from scholarship can have far-reaching benefits for both the university community and society at large."

Finally, Cal State Long Beach was also elevated to R2 status that year. It awarded 49 doctoral degrees during the 2020-2021 academic year, 54 during the 2021-2022 academic year and 55 during the 2022-2023 academic year.

“Beach faculty members have created opportunities for professional advancement through their contributions to our professional doctoral programs," CSULB President Jane Close Conoley said. “Graduates of these programs assumed influential leadership roles in health care, education and engineering. These doctoral programs fill a critical need in California for professionals prepared at the highest level."

During the 2022-2023 academic year, SDSU awarded 160 doctoral degrees, and SF State awarded 29 doctoral degrees.

In 2022, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the American Council on Education partnered together to reenvision the classification system, which was originally developed by the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education in 1973 to facilitate research on institutions of higher education.

The next iteration of Carnegie Classifications will be released in 2025, with major changes coming to both its R1 and R2 classifications. R1 will now be labeled “Doctoral University: Very High Research Spending and Doctorate Production," rather than “Doctoral University: Very High Research Activity," and will require $50 million in total research expenditures and 70 research doctorates awarded. R2 will be renamed “Doctoral University: High Research Spending and Doctorate Production," but will retain the same requirements.

 

Learn more about research at the CSU.

Student working on device
Seven CSUs Hold Prestigious Research Designation
CSU-Nursing-Pathways-Helping-Meet-Workforce-Demands.aspx
  
4/11/2024 10:36 AMThropay, Janessa4/9/20244/9/2024 1:05 PMThe CSU’s nursing pathways help students complete their baccalaureate nursing education and join the workforce faster.NursingStory

The California State University (CSU) has a proven history of providing nursing students with the instruction and hands-on experience necessary to step into the health care field. In light of the nation's nursing shortage, the CSU's nursing pathways are helping to meet workforce demands by bringing accessible, affordable and flexible programs to students from all backgrounds, including many first-generation students.

Currently, 20 of the CSU's 23 campuses have Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) programs, enrolling more than 7,600 nursing students and graduating more than 3,250 students each year. With accreditation by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, these programs are continually assessed for their quality and integrity in effectively educating the next generation of nurses to serve the diverse needs of the state and nation. Demonstrating the caliber of these programs, CSU nursing graduates consistently receive high passage rates that range from the high 80s to 100% on their Registered Nurse National Council Licensure Examination.​

Addressing the State's Toughest Nursing Issues

Although the CSU's nursing programs continue to expand, several challenges restrict the number of nursing students California can educate and graduate. First, securing clinical placements is challenging for nursing programs throughout California. Second, there is a shortage of qualified nursing faculty seeking employment in educational institutions throughout the state and nation.

To promote collaborative problem solving, the CSU Chancellor's Office will facilitate a statewide Nursing Roundtable at CSUN on May 10, bringing together health care employers, community colleges and community-based organizations to seek creative and proactive solutions to the hurdles affecting various levels of nursing education and professional development. A statewide approach to reduce barriers to nursing education that are linked to the current nursing shortage will also require a united effort and thoughtful legislative measures.

In an effort to make nursing more accessible, 13 of the 20 CSU campuses that offer BSN programs also provide online Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN)-to-BSN programs, allowing students to complete all upper-division baccalaureate nursing coursework remotely. The other seven campuses offer a hybrid instructional model of virtual and face-to-face learning, or a jump start for community college nursing students to enroll in BSN courses at the CSU during the summer.

In the 2021-22 academic year, the CSU granted a BSN to 1,396 registered nurses in its ADN-to-BSN programs.

Additionally, many CSU campuses offer both accelerated BSN and second bachelor nursing degree programs. These programs aim to provide access to nontraditional and mid-career individuals looking to become nurses that do not already have a nursing background. By allowing opportunities to meet students at any stage within their academic career, the CSU is proactive in serving both student and statewide nursing workforce needs.

Innovative Nursing Pathways

The CSU has worked closely with many California Community Colleges (CCC) to create streamlined concurrent enrollment programs and to connect students with clinical placements. These programs enable CCC students who are working to earn their ADN​ to also enroll in one of the CSU BSN degree programs. After earning their ADN, students complete their final coursework at the CSU and graduate with a BSN in as little as one to two semesters.

The first state-supported ADN-to-BSN concurrent enrollment pathway started in fall 2019 through a collaboration between Cal State San Bernardino​, Cal State Fullerton and Riverside Community College. CSUSB's program has since grown to include three more community colleges—San Bernardino Valley College, Chaffey College and Golden West College—making it possible for more students to complete their BSN education and join the workforce faster.

“Literature shows that nursing students who take the community college route require eight years for their BSN. By joining the collaborative, students will be done in four years," Terese Burch, CSUSB professor and former chair of the nursing department, said in a CSUSB article. “With this collaboration, nursing students receive high-quality, affordable community college and university curriculum pathways that prepare BSN nurse generalists to serve California."

In recognition of Cal State Fullerton's efforts to offer diverse nursing pathways, CalOptima​ Health recently approved a $5 million grant to aid in expanding their BSN program. The grant will boost collaboration with Orange County community college nursing programs by increasing concurrent enrollment slots from 25 to 40 and will provide a stipend to nursing students in their final​ two semesters, pending a commitment to work in Orange County following graduation.

Cal Poly Humboldt recently partnered with College of the Redwoods and health care industry leaders to create a new, state-supported BSN pathway that will employ a flexible blend of online and in-person courses to accelerate academic and career advancement for students and nurses in rural areas.

Similarly, CSUN's Community College Collaborative Program links the university with several community college partners, including Glendale College, LA City College, College of the Canyons, Pasadena City College and Ventura Community College. If a student pursuing an ADN is attending a community college that does not yet have an established partnership with CSUN, the Department of Nursing is open to developing new partnerships to provide more access to students interested in pursuing their BSN degree.

“In a three-year format, the concurrent enrollment structure leverages the strengths of each educational sector, allowing for the acceleration of Californians' opportunities and access to high-wage, high-impact careers," CSUN President Erika Beck says.

Presently, 13 CSU campuses have formal ​concurrent enrollment nursing programs in partnership with 33 community colleges. These initiatives increase baccalaureate enrollment capacity, lower student costs and reduce the time to BSN graduation. Through work with community colleges and decision makers, the CSU continues to provide students with the instruction and experience necessary to excel on the frontlines of health care.​

Learn more about ADN/RN-to-BSN Programs across the CSU and how they prepare students for the future of health care.​

Cal State San Bernardino nursing students checking on practice patient's vitals.
CSU Nursing Pathways: Helping Meet Workforce Demands
CSU-Launches-Tribal-Listening-Sessions.aspx
  
4/15/2024 12:26 PMWong, Brenda4/9/20244/9/2024 1:00 PMThe CSU last week launched the first of nine sessions in consultation with Tribes and Tribal representatives regarding the repatriation of Native American ancestors and cultural items.CommunityStory

The California State University last week hosted the first of nine listening sessions on NAGPRA (the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act) and its California counterpart, CalNAGPRA. The listening session, held at Cal State Long Beach, brought together Tribal leaders as well as NAGPRA experts and CSU staff.

The CSU is seeking to incorporate Tribal voices as it develops systemwide policies and procedures related to NAGPRA/ CalNAGPRA consultation and repatriation. AB 389, which passed in 2023, requires that this systemwide policy be done in consultation with Tribes and the Native American Heritage Commission. A draft systemwide policy is due to the commission by July 1, 2024 and must be implemented by July 2025.

“The California State University has fallen far short of our obligations to return the Native American ancestors and cultural items that have been on our campuses for far too long," CSU Chancellor Mildred García told attendees at the listening session. “Our actions – and inactions – have caused great pain to Native Americans throughout California. As the CSU's chancellor, I acknowledge this. And I am deeply sorry for it."

García continued: “The CSU understands that our full and timely compliance with NAGPRA, CalNAGPRA and AB 389 is far more than a legal obligation. It is a moral imperative. And that moral imperative requires that the repatriation of ancestors and cultural items be done responsibly, respectfully, with accountability and in a way that honors tribal heritage, culture, values and beliefs."

García pledged to listen to Tribal representatives “authentically and with humility" and in a spirit of “earnest consultation" as the CSU works to develop its policy.

Aside from the formal listening sessions, the CSU will also be offering opportunities for one-on-one consultations with Tribal representatives.

As the CSU continues with this process, it has committed to dedicating additional funding for personnel and resources. The CSU's 2024-25 operating budget request includes $4.25 million for NAGPRA compliance, which would include funding for a variety of university and systemwide positions as well as operational costs.

Tribal representatives can learn more about the CSU's systemwide policy development process as well as future listening session dates and locations online at https://nagpra.calstate.edu/csu-policy.​​

a woven basket
CSU Launches Tribal Listening Sessions
CSAC-and-Californias-Public-Higher-Education-Segments-Collaborate-to-Ease-Access-to-Financial-Aid.aspx
  
4/12/2024 10:26 AMRawls, Aaron4/9/20244/9/2024 9:20 AMCalifornia Dream Act Applications will open to first-time financial aid applicants from mixed-status families to meet financial aid deadlines for Fall 2024.Financial AidPress Release

The California Student Aid Commission (CSAC), together with the University of California (UC), the California State University (CSU), and the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office (CCCCO) announced today (April 9) an alternative financial aid application option for California students from mixed-status households for those that have been unable to successfully complete the Free Application for Student Aid (FAFSA). Mixed-status families include a student who is a U.S. citizen with one or more parents without a Social Security Number (SSN). Today’s announcement offers first-time mixed-status students who have struggled to complete their FAFSA an alternative avenue to apply for state and educational institution financial aid.

In recent weeks, the U.S Department of Education has made progress to ensure that the new online FAFSA form is more streamlined for prospective college students who are eligible for federal financial aid. However, students from mixed-status families have faced logistical challenges with the new FAFSA application. We encourage students to attempt to complete FASFA first, to ensure that federal aid can be received. Additional instructions for mixed-status families completing the FASFA can be found here: https://studentaid.gov/announcements-events/fafsa-support/contributor-social-security-number. Prospective college students still unable to complete the FASFA, will now be able to complete a California Dream Act Application (CADAA) as a short-term measure until they are able to access and complete a FAFSA to receive the federal financial aid available to them. This joint effort to open the CADAA as an alternative pathway for first-time student aid applicants from mixed-status households reflects a shared commitment to making higher education more affordable and accessible for Californians from all backgrounds.

Completing the FAFSA remains the best way for students to maximize their financial aid. As the state of California continues to find additional opportunities to support students and families navigating the FAFSA's logistical challenges, mixed-status students must still complete the FAFSA to access their federal financial aid awards, including Pell Grants, Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant, Federal Work-Study, and subsidized federal student loans. The CADAA will only allow students to apply for state and educational institution financial aid.

Students from mixed-status families navigate complex challenges in pursuit of higher education. Many are first-generation college students for whom financial planning and support are essential. Financial aid professionals, advisors and outreach staff from CSAC, UC, CSU, and the community colleges are working to help students and families navigate the process in the coming months.

Today's announcement builds on Governor Newsom's signing of Assembly Bill 1887, which extends the California priority deadline for state financial aid by a month to May 2. Opening the CADAA will allow students from mixed-status families to meet the new May 2 deadline, while bringing much-needed certainty and clarity to the college decision making process.

More information on the California Dream Act and how students from mixed-status families can apply for state financial aid beginning on Tuesday, April 9 is available at  www.csac.ca.gov/cadaa-msf. Students and families can receive help filling out the FAFSA or CADAA at free in-person Cash for College Workshops, found here https://cash4college.csac.ca.gov/ or Statewide Cash for College Webinars, found here https://www.csac.ca.gov/post/cash-college-workshop-registration, including at events focused on serving mixed-status families.


Governor Gavin Newsom said, “Every Californian deserves access to an affordable high-quality education. I am grateful that our federal and state partners are working tirelessly to provide options for students and families."

California Student Aid Commission Executive Director Marlene L. Garcia said, “Making sure all students can access the financial aid they are entitled to is at the heart of what we do. We are proud to work with our institutional partners, Governor Newsom, and Legislative leaders to make sure that impacted students from mixed-status families have a viable path to access financial aid and the life-changing opportunities available at our public colleges and universities."

University of California President Michael V. Drake, M.D., said, “The University of California has consistently worked to expand educational access to students of all backgrounds. Offering robust financial aid and removing barriers for all students to access that support are critically important steps to creating opportunity for Californians. The University will continue to advocate for full access to the FAFSA and all federal financial aid for our students from mixed-status families."

California State University Chancellor Mildred García, Ed.D., said, “Ensuring that students from all backgrounds have authentic access to an affordable, high-quality degree is at the very core of the California State University mission. This includes making sure that students are able to obtain the ​financial aid to which they are entitled. The CSU is pleased to participate in this joint effort to address the challenges currently confronting first-time students of mixed-status families, and we encourage them to first attempt to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). If they are unable to do so, students should then complete the California Dream Act Application (CADAA) well before the May 2 deadline and later complete the FAFSA as soon as that becomes feasible. The CSU will continue to remain as flexible as possible for these students as we support the U.S. Department of Education in its work toward a permanent solution."

California Community Colleges Chancellor Sonya Christian, Ph.D., said, "This temporary workaround to some of the recent challenges with the new FAFSA rollout will preserve access and support for students transferring from community college to a four-year college or university in the fall. We are committed to overcoming obstacles to providing student financial aid as the U.S. Department of Education works diligently on a permanent solution, and we are grateful to Gov. Newsom, the Legislature, the Student Aid Commission and the Biden administration for their work to provide students with equitable access to an affordable higher education.​"

Senate President Pro Tempore Mike McGuire (D-North Coast), said, “The Golden State always advances an unwavering commitment to ensuring that all eligible students can access financial aid. That's what makes California great – we're always helping one another and uplifting the next generation. This interim measure is a step forward, and we will continue our steadfast collaboration with federal counterparts to pursue a permanent solution."

California Assembly Speaker Assembly Member Robert Rivas said, “Families deserve to know with certainty that they continue to have access to their state and institutional aid, in the 2024-25 school year and beyond. As many young Californians struggle with the costs of attending college, we will keep partnering with the federal administration to ensure students from mixed-status families can complete the FAFSA and receive the federal financial aid to which they are entitled."​



About the California State University 

The California State University is the nation's largest four-year public university system, providing transformational opportunities for upward mobility to more than 450,000 students from all socioeconomic backgrounds. More than half of CSU students are people of color, and nearly one-third of them are first-generation college students. Because the CSU's 23 universities provide a high-quality education at an incredible value, they are rated among the best in the nation for promoting social mobility in national college rankings from U.S. News & World Report, the Wall Street Journal and Washington Monthly. The CSU powers California and the nation, sending nearly 127,000 career-ready graduates into the workforce each year. In fact, one in every 20 Americans holding a college degree earned it at the CSU. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU newsroom.​​ 

A group of students sitting around a tree, some are working on a laptop.
California Student Aid Commission and California’s Public Higher Education Segments Collaborate to Ease Access to Financial Aid
Chair-Chancellor-Share-Their-Journeys-to-Leadership.aspx
  
4/8/2024 12:31 PMBeall, Alex4/4/20244/4/2024 5:40 AMCSU Chancellor Mildred García and Board of Trustees Chair Wenda Fong shared stories and answered student questions at a special livestreamed event this week.LeadershipStory

California State University Chancellor Mildred García and CSU Board of Trustees Chair Wenda Fong shared their “Journeys to Leadership" at a special live event at CSU Channel Islands this week.

Moderated by Daisy Navarrete, the Associated Students Inc. president at CSU Channel Islands, García and Fong answered questions submitted by students from across the CSU system. They shared stories about their backgrounds, their careers, obstacles they have overcome and advice for the future.

View the full recording.​

García reflected on growing up in a housing project in Brooklyn as the daughter of migrants from Puerto Rico who worked in a factory, as well as her determination to advance herself through education. She remembered a favorite saying of her parents: “The only inheritance a poor family can leave you is a good education."

Fong, the granddaughter of Chinese immigrants who had worked multiple jobs to survive, said that her grandparents had similar dreams for their own children and grandchildren, envisioning that they would “never have to hold anything heavier than a pencil."

Both García and Fong emphasized that CSU students share similar family backgrounds and stories of perseverance as they pursue higher education as a means of achieving greater goals.

“Our campuses are your homes; they're where you can become a leader and where you can change the things that you feel you need to give voice to," García said. “And, you can do that at all of our campuses at the CSU and walk out being wonderful leaders in your communities and in your professions."

“Never let anybody stop you from your dreams," García added. “If you have the passion and commitment to move forward, do it."

wenda fong mildred garcia and Daisy Navarrete
Chair, Chancellor Share Their 'Journeys to Leadership'
CSU-gears-up-for-solar-eclipse.aspx
  
4/8/2024 8:16 AMBeall, Alex4/3/20244/3/2024 8:00 AMFrom a movie project to group viewings, read the ways faculty and students are getting involved in this rare celestial event. CommunityStory

​From 10:06 a.m. to 12:22 p.m. P.D.T. on April 8, parts of the U.S. will be cast in shadow as the moon moves to cover the sun.

While some areas of the south and northeast of the U.S. as well as Mexico will experience a total eclipse—when the moon completely blocks the sun—California will only see a partial eclipse. This solar eclipse marks the last time until 2044 that anywhere in the U.S. will see a total eclipse.

During the rare celestial event, astronomy enthusiasts across the CSU will be gazing at the sky. Take a look at some of the ways students and faculty are gearing up for the upcoming solar eclipse.

Sonoma State

Laura Peticolas, associate director of EdEon STEM Learning at Sonoma State, is leading the Eclipse Megamovie, a project with more than a hundred volunteers photographing the sun as it moves across the U.S. The team plans to stitch all the photos into a movie and provide what Peticolas refers to as “a rare opportunity to study the secret lives of solar jets and plumes.” Peticolas also oversaw the 2017 Eclipse Megamovie, which was the first crowdsourced project turning total eclipse images into a movie.

NASA’s Neurodiversity Network (N3), a project created by Sonoma State Professor Lynn Cominsky, is partnering with several high schools within the path of totality to increase curiosity around and educate learners on the total solar eclipse. Programming includes an astronomy and rocket curriculum to accommodate autistic learners with the goal of encouraging NASA participation and STEM employment for neurodivergent students. N3 is also working with the 2024 Eclipse Megamovie project to create flyers with information on the eclipse and how to support neuro​diverse learners.

Fresno State

Fresno State’s Department of Physics will host a public viewing of the eclipse at the Downing Planetarium​ from 9:45 a.m. to 1 p.m. Solar telescopes will be set up for public use, and safe-viewing glasses will be available to buy for $5 at the planetarium. A free program titled “Lights Out! Eclipses: Whys, Wonders, and Wows” will run in the planetarium’s 72-seat theater, explaining the causes of eclipses and their historical significance. This program will run from 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. In Fresno, the eclipse will reach a maximum of 50.9% coverage.

Additionally, the Fresno State STEM Education Center, a group of faculty and students dedicated to supporting K-16+ STEM literacy, will host its own viewing on the practice field near the Science II building. A solar telescope and safe-viewing glasses will be available for interested participants.

San Francisco State

From 10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. in the plaza in front of Thornton Hall, SF State's Department of Physics & Astronomy will host an observation of the eclipse. For safe viewing, there will be a solar telescope and other safety equipment set up.

Ahead of the eclipse, astronomer and educator Andrew Fraknoi visited SF State on March 11 to teach about how eclipses occur, what scientists learn from it, where it will be most visible and how to observe the eclipse and sun safely. All attendees received a free pair of safe-viewing eclipse glasses.

Cal State San Bernardino

At CSUSB, the Department of Physics and Astronomy’s viewing of the eclipse will be outside the Physical Sciences Building at 10 a.m. Students trained as “eclipse ambassadors” and donning bright pink shirts will be available to explain the phenomenon to curious observers.

Cal State Long Beach

In the Upper Quad, CSULB's Department of Physics and Astronomy will observe the eclipse from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Safe-viewing glasses will be provided for participants. Maximum coverage will be at 11:11 a.m.

Cal State LA

Cal State LA’s Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Honors College​ eclipse viewing will take place at the King Hall Courtyard from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Safe-viewing glasses will be provided for participants.


See more events from Monterey Bay, Northridge, San Diego​ and San Marcos.


Remember that regular sunglasses are not safe to use when viewing the solar eclipse directly. Obtain safe-viewing glasses before observing the event.

college student in astronomy lesson
CSU Gears Up for Solar Eclipse
CSUSB-Hosts-Inaugural-Native-American-Indigenous-Education-Summit.aspx
  
3/28/2024 10:03 AMBeall, Alex3/28/20243/28/2024 2:55 PMThe event provided attendees a space to discuss challenges within higher education for Native communities.DiversityStory

​​The Native American/Indigenous Education ​​Summit held at Cal State San Bernardino ​on March 23 was the first event of its kind​ to host conversations with state, federal and Tribal governments and examine institutional operations, pedagogical commitments and cultural responsivity to address the voices and needs of Native American and Indigenous students in post-secondary access, inclusivity and preparedness.

Hosted by the California Indian Nations College and Kumeyaay Community College, the free summit focused on the topics of equity, access and inclusion—while discussion topics included census and identity, cultural responsivity (curricula and student services), and equitable access to higher education.

Speakers included ​Naomi Miguel (Tohono O'odham), executive director of the White House Initiative on Advancing Educational Equity, Excellence, and Economic Opportunity for Native Americans and Strengthening Tribal Colleges and Universities; Stanley Rodriguez (Santa Ysabel Band of the Iipay Nation), director of Kumeyaay Community College; Tony Thurmond, state superintendent of public education for the California Department of Education; and James C. Ramos (Serrano/Cahuilla), San Bernardino state Assembly member and CSUSB alumnus; as well as Tribal chairs, native educators and native students.

According to the Postsecondary National Policy Institute, 28% of the 18- to 24-year-old Native American population was enrolled in college in 2021 compared to 38% of the overall U.S. population, only 16.8% of Native American or Alaskan Native residents aged 25 or over have earned a bachelor's degree or higher, and Native American college enrollment has declined 38% since fall 2010.

Article picked up from Inside CSUSB.

Indigenous performers playing instruments 
Indigenous performers




CSUSB president at podium
CSUSB Hosts Inaugural Native American/Indigenous Education Summit
CSU-to-Receive-$1.5-Million-from-Mellon-Foundation-to-Expand-Ethnic-Studies-Pathways.aspx
  
3/28/2024 10:00 AMThropay, Janessa3/28/20243/28/2024 9:55 AMThe CSU is one of five public universities selected to receive larger grants from Mellon’s Affirming Multivocal Humanities initiative. DiversityPress Release

The California State University (CSU) has been awarded $1.5 million from the Mellon Foundation to help increase the number of credit-bearing programs that link ethnic studies concepts to gender and sexuality studies. The CSU is among five public universities receiving select larger grants as part of the Mellon Foundation’s Affirming Multivocal Humanities initiative. In all, the foundation is awarding more than $18 million to 95 curricular programs across the nation. 

“The CSU is grateful to the Mellon Foundation for this generous funding, which is an important step to expand pathways and enhance classroom experiences in ways that intentionally link race and ethnicity and gender and sexuality concepts into the course content,” said Laura Massa, interim associate vice chancellor of Academic and Faculty Programs at the CSU Chancellor’s Office. “These disciplines are critical for creating a shared language and understanding of our students’ diverse histories, backgrounds and experiences—and ultimately a more equitable society.” 

Grant funding will go to the CSUs to bolster existing ethnic studies programs and support the development of new programming. Support for existing programs could include adding new degree concentrations, establishing transfer pathways and creating blended bachelor’s-master’s degree programs. The CSU Chancellor’s Office also plans to host a convening of ethnic studies and gender and sexuality studies faculty from across the system to gather collective input which will inform grant distribution.  

As a result of university policy changes and state legislation, CSU students are required to complete a three-unit course in ethnic studies to graduate. With the most ethnically, economically and academically diverse student body in the nation, the CSU is well positioned to advance nuanced scholarship on the breadth of the human experience through race, ethnic, gender and sexuality studies. 

Half of CSU students are from historically underserved communities and 21 of the 23 campuses are designated as Hispanic Serving Institutions. The CSU provides more than half of all undergraduate degrees earned in the state of California by Latinx, African American and Native American students combined.



About the California State University 

The California State University is the nation's largest four-year public university system, providing transformational opportunities for upward mobility to more than 450,000 students from all socioeconomic backgrounds. More than half of CSU students are people of color, and nearly one-third of them are first-generation college students. Because the CSU's 23 universities provide a high-quality education at an incredible value, they are rated among the best in the nation for promoting social mobility in national college rankings from U.S. News & World Report, the Wall Street Journal and Washington Monthly. The CSU powers California and the nation, sending nearly 127,000 career-ready graduates into the workforce each year. In fact, one in every 20 Americans holding a college degree earned it at the CSU. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU newsroom. 

 

About The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation  

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation is the nation’s largest supporter of the arts and humanities.  Since 1969, the Foundation has been guided by its core belief that the humanities and arts are essential to human understanding. The Foundation believes that the arts and humanities are where we express our complex humanity, and that everyone deserves the beauty, transcendence, and freedom that can be found there.  Through our grants, we seek to build just communities enriched by meaning and empowered by critical thinking, where ideas and imagination can thrive. Learn more at mellon.org. ​

A group of diverse students smiling and sitting together.
CSU to Receive $1.5 Million from Mellon Foundation to Expand Ethnic Studies Pathways
Stanislaus-State-President-Appointed-2024.aspx
  
3/27/2024 9:01 AMThropay, Janessa3/27/20243/27/2024 8:50 AMThe California State University Board of Trustees has appointed Britt Rios-Ellis to serve as president of California State University, Stanislaus. LeadershipPress Release

The California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees has appointed Britt Rios-Ellis to serve as president of California State University, Stanislaus. Rios-Ellis currently serves as provost and executive vice president of Academic Affairs at Oakland University (OU), a public research university in Rochester, Michigan.

“I am both honored and humbled to serve this outstanding university alongside the talented faculty, staff, administrators and students at Stanislaus State, and to be the first new president selected under the leadership of Chancellor Mildred García," said Rios-Ellis. “I am eager to get to know the Turlock and Stockton communities and work together to ensure that the positive impact of our students' and the university's overall success is felt profoundly throughout the region."

Rios-Ellis succeeds Interim President Susan E. Borrego, who has served in the role since the retirement of President Emerita Ellen Junn in summer 2023.

“Dr. Rios-Ellis is an inspirational, compassionate and mission-driven leader, guided by a commitment to inclusive excellence and student success," said CSU Trustee Yammilette Rodriguez, chair of the Stanislaus State Presidential Search Committee. “Her wide-ranging experience, student-centered approach and commitment to broader community engagement make her the ideal candidate to lead Stanislaus State in its next exciting chapter."

Since joining the Oakland University leadership team in 2021, Rios-Ellis has focused on student and faculty success efforts with an equity lens, resulting in an 8% increase in retention of underrepresented students, as well as decreasing equity gaps in bottleneck courses, and time to graduation. She has worked with faculty to increase research activity, with the OU Senate to strengthen shared governance, and with deans and faculty to establish new and needed academic programs. She also coordinated successful fundraising and budget realignment efforts for the university and led an initiative to secure OU's Carnegie elective classification for Community Engagement.

In all, Rios-Ellis has led over $59 million in student- and community-​strengthening health and education-related efforts funded by agencies such as the National Institutes of Health, U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Department of Education, as well as in collaboration with industry partners to reinforce workforce pipelines.

This marks a return to the CSU system for Rios-Ellis. Prior to joining OU, she served as founding dean of the College of Health Sciences and Human Services at California State University, Monterey Bay (2014 to 2020), where she led fundraising and strategic planning efforts and co-founded the Master of Science Physician Assistant Program—the first of its kind in the CSU.

From 1994 to 2014, Rios-Ellis served as a faculty member in the Department of Health Science at California State University, Long Beach. During that time, she also served as founding director of CSULB's Center for Latino Community Health, Evaluation, and Leadership Training (2005 to 2015) in alliance with UnidosUS, where she worked to promote and advocate for the health, culture and well-being of diverse communities. She was recognized with a CSULB Outstanding Professor Award in 2013 for her significant impact on Latinx health research and education, and was named Woman of the Year by the National Hispanic Business Women's Association in 2010 and the Regional Hispanic Chamber of Commerce in 2009. Additionally, in 2008, she received the Sol Award from the Los Angeles County Office of HIV/AIDS Planning Prevention.

​Rios-Ellis earned a bachelor's degree in political science and Spanish, a master's degree in health and fitness management, and a Ph.D. in community health—all from the University of Oregon.

Rios-Ellis will assume the university presidency on July 1, 2024.

​ 


About the California State University 

The California State University is the nation's largest four-year public university system, providing transformational opportunities for upward mobility to more than 450,000 students from all socioeconomic backgrounds. More than half of CSU students are people of color, and nearly one-third of them are first-generation college students. Because the CSU's 23 universities provide a high-quality education at an incredible value, they are rated among the best in the nation for promoting social mobility in national college rankings from U.S. News & World Report, the Wall Street Journal and Washington Monthly. The CSU powers California and the nation, sending nearly 127,000 career-ready graduates into the workforce each year. In fact, one in every 20 Americans holding a college degree earned it at the CSU. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU newsroom. 

woman smiling
Britt Rios-Ellis Appointed President of California State University, Stanislaus
CSU-Celebrates-the-Life-of-Stephen-Weber.aspx
  
3/26/2024 3:46 PMThropay, Janessa3/26/20243/26/2024 3:45 PMFormer president of San Diego State University passes away at 82.LeadershipStory

The California State University (CSU) commemorates the life of former San Diego State University President Stephen L. Weber, who passed away on March 17, 2024, due to complications from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). He was 82. ​

Weber was the seventh president of San Diego State University from 1996-2011, leading SDSU through a time of growth and national prominence.  

Through Weber’s creativity, strong work ethic and dedication to his students, the university experienced notable increases in diversity, student support services and academic excellence. Of note during his 15-year tenure, SDSU led the nation in improved graduation rates, with the percentage of students who graduate in four years growing from 38% to 66%, and pioneered programs for military and low-income, first-generation students. Additionally, Weber helped successfully advocate for a state bill that authorized the CSU to offer independent doctoral programs. Today, SDSU offers more than a dozen doctoral degrees. 

The university also saw growth of its physical space with several new buildings brought online during Weber’s tenure, including the Arts and Letters Building and the Parma Payne Goodall Alumni Center. Research and philanthropic support also increased, with more than $1.1 billion secured in external research and development funding between 2000 and 2011.  

“Dr. Weber leaves a rich legacy at San Diego State, and the positive impact of his service will span generations,” said CSU Chancellor Mildred García. “Under his visionary, principled and compassionate leadership, the university made extraordinary gains in student success, enhanced access for students from all backgrounds, elevated its athletic program, inspired philanthropic support and forged vital community relationships that continue to this day. San Diego Stateand the CSU more broadlyare more vital and impactful institutions for his extraordinary service.” 

Weber had a profound influence nationally, serving as chair of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities Board of Directors in 2002 and on the board for AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination) from 2011-2020. He also sat on the boards of The Peres Center for Peace and Student Veterans of America.    

He was an engaged supporter of student-athletes and was instrumental in the formation of the Mountain West Conference in 1998. He served on the NCAA Board of Directors, NCAA Executive Committee, NCAA Subcommittee on Gender and Diversity Issues, the Presidential Oversight Committee for the Bowl Championships Series and the Board of Directors of the Mountain West Conference, which honored him with the Dr. Albert C. Yates Distinguished Service Award. 

Weber joined San Diego State after a year as interim provost for academic affairs at the State University of New York system. Before that, he served eight years as president of SUNY’s Oswego campus. He also held the positions of vice president of academic affairs at St. Cloud State in Minnesota, dean of arts and sciences at Fairfield University in Connecticut and was an assistant professor of philosophy at the University of Maine. 

A native of Boston, Weber earned his bachelor's degree in philosophy from Bowling Green State University and his Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Notre Dame.​

Stephen Weber walking at a graduation ceremony.
CSU Celebrates the Life of Stephen L. Weber
Counted-Data-Collection-on-Student-Parents.aspx
  
3/25/2024 8:46 AMBeall, Alex3/25/20243/25/2024 1:50 PMTo comply with a recent California bill, the CSU is now collecting data on student parents—which will help the university better serve this group.Student SuccessStory

​Even though they represent more than one in five college students in the U.S., student parents have historically not received the targeted focus they require and deserve along their educational journey. Champions across the CSU have been working tirelessly to ensure student parents have the support and resources they need to persist to graduation.

“This is a huge swath of people who are not being served as well as they could be, who are being treated like every other student when they have, in a lot of ways, more barriers," says Julia Rose, director of basic needs at CSU Channel Islands. “But they also have more wisdom and more life experience than some of their peers, and that is not being engaged because the population has been invisible. … I think about this work as inclusion work. The first step is remembering that this is a population on your campus that you need to consider when you're planning things and when you're building things, whether it be a program or a physical facility."

As part of the CSU Pregnant and Parenting Student Network—a committee sponsored by the Michelson 20MM Foundation that includes campus representatives from Fresno, San Luis Obispo and Sacramento, among others—this group of champions recently threw their support behind California Assembly Bill No. 2881 (AB 2881). Passed in 2022, AB 2881 seeks to improve access to classes and information about basic needs resources for student parents, smoothing their path to graduation. One provision required that the CSU and California Community Colleges, and requested that​ the University of California, offer priority registration to student parents.

To provide them with priority registration, universities need to identify their enrolled student parents—making the formal collection of data on this student group a beneficial byproduct of the bill. Such data will help universities understand the unique characteristics or challenges of their student parents, such as their personal demographics or first-generation or Pell-eligible status.

“Student parents are a visible population in terms of the sheer numbers, but they're also invisible because we don't intentionally collect that data on them," says Larissa Mercado-López, chair of Fresno State's Department of Women's, Gender & Sexuality Studies. “AB 2881 allows us to take advantage of that data to better understand the experiences, the challenges of our students and help them to feel a stronger sense of inclusion."

“This is an opportunity to make visible this population that's been so historically invisible—but that has tremendous skills and assets that we could be uplifting—and be purposeful in how we support and include and recognize them," she continues. “Through their experiences, they enrich our classrooms. They have such deep connections to their education because they're sacrificing time spent with their children to be in our classroom—so there's so much intentionality that they bring."

By the bill's deadline of July 1, 2023, the CSU was able to implement a mechanism in the online student registration system that allowed students to self-certify their student parent status and receive priority registration for future semesters.

“AB 2881 has presented a wonderful opportunity for the CSU system to collaborate between our Registrar's Offices and our Basic Needs and Housing constituency groups in order to find and ultimately better support our pregnant and parenting student population," says Liz Reed, CSU assistant director of Enrollment Management Technology. “We are in full compliance across the system with AB 2881 and are pleased to share that 2.1% of our total student population self-reported that they have at least one dependent under the age of 18 during the fall 2023 semester and received a priority registration date."

The Data Advantage

Before AB 2881 passed, some of these CSU champions had been informally identifying their university's student parents to collect related data by individually marking students in the online system. For example, Haley Myers Dillon, director of Strategic Partnerships, the Parents & Families Program and the Women's Resource Center at Sacramento State, has been able to gather extensive data on Sacramento State's 9,430 student parents​, who make up about 30% of the student body.

Her data collection has revealed that student parents are overrepresented in terms of historically marginalized groups, such as women, students of color, Pell-eligible status, first-generation status and student loan debt. It's also shown that 98% of Sacramento State student parents are transfer students.

“The CSU is an institution that is helping reduce intergenerational poverty," Myers Dillon says, adding that investing in student parents is investing in two generations. “They are the future of the state, and the CSU is providing an education that can be more of an economic equalizer. These student parents are the people the CSU is working for."

By instituting a systemwide process for collecting data on student parents, the CSU will have even more extensive data to better equip itself for meeting these students' needs.

“When we focus on student parents, we're also focusing on first-gen students, students of color," Mercado-López says. “Student parents are at the intersections of many inequity categories, and so when we specifically target them, we're also lifting up progress in all of these other graduation equity areas. There's real potential for moving our progress forward rapidly with some investment."

With such data in hand, student parents can be automatically added as a group to the CSU's early alert systems, like the CSU does with other groups, such as Guardian Scholars and Pell Grant recipients. A March 2021 report from the Institute for Women's Policy Research found that more than half of student parents stop out of college before earning a degree. The early alert system can help CSUs ensure these students are receiving sufficient support and outreach early on if they begin to move toward stopping out.

Similarly, CSUs can use the data to target student parents with reenrollment campaigns, a key equity priority for Graduation Initiative 2025. “It's important to know how many of those students who​ stopped out are parenting students because the support that those students would need to return to campus is different than their peers," Rose says. “If you know who those students are, you can know how well they're doing, how many you are keeping from year to year, how many are graduating, and how to increase those numbers and make sure that we have an educated workforce."

CSUs will also be able to implement targeted group communications about student parent events, on-campus resources and other services that will help connect the students with each other and their campus.

Lastly, the data will be able to demonstrate how large this student group is, which would help drive the development of additional programs, services and efforts to ensure their needs are met—such as adding a university staff member dedicated to student parents and adjusting classroom and academic policies for their benefit.

“I'm hoping that it will shape, from a faculty perspective, how we think about our own classroom policies: Who is in our classroom, who we are 'invisiblizing,' who we are creating more challenges for through our absence policies or our late work policies," says Mercado-López, who has created a student parent competency training module for faculty that includes such policies. “Through the data, it will create more visibility of this group so that we can be more attentive to them in our syllabus."

Myers Dillon says one such improvement could be offering upper division courses as hybrid courses with online components and during evening hours and summer session to meet student parents scheduling needs.

“There need to be multiple modalities, methods and times that students can access the material," she says. “Our student parents are hungry to make an economic investment in themselves and their future for their children and their family. They just can't always make it work because, especially in single-income earner households, they don't have time."

A Model of Best Practice

Through the Urban Institute Data-to-Action Campaign for Parenting Students—which focuses on data collection on parenting status as a way to support student parents—CSU Channel Islands and Cal Poly San Luis Obispo are receiving additional support to meet AB 2881 requirements. Along with a collection of U.S. universities and colleges, the two CSUs were awarded $60,000 grants through the campaign's College Community of Practice, and will benefit from the Urban Institute's expertise and guidance.

“The Urban Institute project's aim as a whole is to be on the ground floor of helping universities across the country identify and better support parenting students," Rose says. “It is about being able to build resource guides and create best practices around how to identify and count parenting students with an eye towards improving services and policies for those students."

To participate in the project, the two universities created multidisciplinary teams, with representatives from student affairs, institutional research, the Title IX office, the student body and more. Together, they are building practices for how best to collect and evaluate data to improve and expand resources and programs for student parents. Their processes would then serve as a model for the rest of the CSU.

“This grant has allowed two campuses to create a proof of concept: Here are some lessons we learned, here are some pitfalls that people should look out for and here's how we've done it," says Tina Cheuk, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo assistant professor of education. “We're trying to make the best decisions along the way and bring in as many people as possible, so that we get the best outcomes for our students with dependents. … I'm hopeful that Cal State will be one of the first public systems to gather student data on student parents in a systematic way."

​Serving Student Parents

​Though the new influx of data will help improve services for student parents, CSUs already have a range of support available for them. Many campuses offer on-campus childcare, and CSU students may qualify for subsidized care at the on-campus children’s center or at off-campus facilities. Some campuses also offer student parent support groups in-person and online, like the Dolphins with Dependents parenting student support group at CSUCI or the Stude​​nt Parent Peer Ambassadors program​, Dads’ Collaborative and Zoom-based support group at Sacramento State.

Through the Basic Needs Initiative, campuses may also provide child-related items through their food pantry or clothing closet. For example, Fresno State houses the nation’s first university-based diaper bank, hosts a children’s clothing closet and stocks groceries like formula in its Amendola Family Student Cupboard​. Other campus resources may include grant options and spaces on campus like a mother’s room or family study room.

Students should check with their respective campus for specific services and resources offered.​

Find a campus's parenting stude​nts webpage.​






Student in graduation regalia with child
Counted: Data Collection on Student Parents
Invest-in-CSU-Invest-in-CA-Communities.aspx
  
3/25/2024 1:29 PMRuble, Alisia3/25/20243/25/2024 8:00 AMCSU chancellor calls for predictable funding in 2024-25 California state budget.BudgetStory
CSU Chancellor Mildred García testified in front of the California State Senate Budget Subcommittee #1 on Education in support of the CSU’s budget request March 14, alongside University of California President Michael V. Drake.

In her testimony, Chancellor García reminded legislators that the CSU serves one of the most ethnically, economically and academically diverse student populations in the country—more than 450,000 students across its 23 universities—and that it is California’s greatest driver of social mobility and economic vitality. More than half of CSU undergraduates are from traditionally underrepresented backgrounds, nearly half are Pell-eligible and more than one-quarter are the first in their families to attend college.

“The CSU is a model for serving America’s new majority,” Chancellor García said. “Resources entrusted to the CSU are not an expenditure, but an investment, an investment with dividends measured in social mobility, in more vital communities, and in powering California’s future diverse and educated workforce—all at a scale only the CSU can provide.”

Chancellor García also highlighted key areas where support is needed, underscoring the message that “predictability is as important a currency as the money itself.” The CSU requests that the state honor the funding set forth in the governor’s multi-year compact—either as originally structured or as modified in the governor’s January budget proposal—and support ​an education facilities bond that includes higher education.

On January 10, California Governor Gavin Newsom proposed a state budget that would defer the 2024-25 CSU compact funding commitment of approximately $240 million by one year—until fiscal year 2025-26—to help address the state budget shortfall. Reiterating his commitment to the CSU and to advance compact-related goals, the governor proposes to reimburse the CSU with a one-time payment of approximately $240 million at the start of fiscal year 2025-26, in addition to resuming ongoing compact funding.

State Funding is Key

Unlike other educational institutions, the CSU relies on only two revenue sources: the state’s general fund—which comprises approximately 60% of its core revenue—and student tuition and fees, which remain among the lowest in the country. The CSU also faces increased costs from recent collective bargaining agreements, rising health insurance premiums and costs associated with its steadfast commitment to strengthen Title IX and other anti-discrimination programs​ and to achieve full and timely compliance with NAGPRA and CalNAGPRA.

Considering both the multi-year compact and the five-year tuition plan the CSU adopted last September, revenue projections enabled the university to reach multi-year contracts with its labor unions, which include increased parental leave and a return to salary steps for some unions​.

In addition to deploying difficult cost-containment strategies at both the campus and system levels, the CSU has introduced key efficiency strategies, including an Enrollment Target and Budget Reallocation Plan that will better align funding resources with the realities of shifting demographics and student demand. And it is identifying additional collaboration opportunities among the 23 universities to further reduce costs.

“But without sustained state funding, this work becomes exceedingly difficult—our progress in mission-critical areas will be slowed, to the detriment of our diverse and deserving students,” Chancellor García said. “When students enroll at the CSU, they expect they will receive​ the quality academic programming and student support they need to graduate in a timely manner. These cannot be turned on one year and off the next due to volatility in our ability to pay for them.”​

Investing in California Communities

Earning a CSU degree has the power to change the trajectory of students’ lives, and the lives of their family members. The university provides more than half of all undergraduate degrees earned by California’s Latinx, African American and Native American students combined, and has garnered multiple Top 10 spots in a wide range of national social mobility rankings, including CollegeNET’s “Social Mobility Index.”

At about $6,000 per academic year, CSU tuition is among the lowest in the country. Nearly 80% of undergraduate students receive some form of financial aid, and more than half of them graduate with zero student loan debt. In fact, CSUs have been recognized for a high return on investment in rankings like Washington Monthly’s “Best Bang for the Buck” in the West.

A recent economic impact report showed that the CSU and its 23 universities contribute significantly to California’s economy. In the 2018-2019 academic year, CSU-related expenditures were responsible for supporting nearly 209,400 jobs and $26.9 billion in industry activity throughout California, as well as $1.6 billion in state and local tax revenue. 

The CSU’s more than 4 million alumni contribute significantly to the state’s, and the country’s, economic well-being. Every 1 in 10 California employees is a CSU graduate, and every 1 in 20 Americans holding a college degree earned it at the CSU.

The CSU has emerged from a period of challenge and transition and is now on a steeply upward trajectory thanks, in part, to historic state funding in previous budget cycles.

Its flagship student success effort, Graduation Initiative 2025, has led to all-time highs in graduation rates for students from all backgrounds, and the four-year graduation rate has nearly doubled since 2015, increasing from 19% to 35%. In fact, the CSU has produced a cumulative total of more than 150,000 additional degree-holders since the initiative was launched. Improved graduation rates also mean improved access for future students, and the university is closing the gap toward the state’s enrollment targets.

The CSU also recently completed a systemwide inventory of existing efforts across all 23 universities to support Black student success. The resulting report assesses the many programs in place, highlights current areas of strength that can be scaled across the system and sets forth university action items that align with the recommendations of the CSU’s Black Student Success Report, which will be implemented over the next 18 months.

These are just a few of the myriad examples that underscore an undeniable positive momentum for the CSU, but, as Chancellor García said in her testimony, “sustaining this critical momentum requires the necessary ongoing resources.”

Watch Chancellor García's full testimony.

 


four people standing in front of a California flag
Invest in the CSU; Invest in California’s Future
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CSU-Creates-Unified-General-Education-Pathway-for-All-Students.aspx
  
4/17/20244/17/2024 4:05 PMNew, simplified lower-division GE requirements will take effect in fall 2025.New, simplified lower-division GE requirements will take effect in fall 2025.
Student wearing a backpack walking through campus with his back facing us surrounded by other students.
CSU Creates Unified General Education Pathway for All StudentsStudent SuccessPress Release
CSU-Bakersfield-Presidential-Search-Committee-to-Hold-Open-Forum.aspx
  
4/15/20244/15/2024 9:40 AMThe California State University Board of Trustees is beginning the search for the next regularly appointed president of California State University, Bakersfield.
An image of the CSU Bakersfield campus sign.
California State University, Bakersfield Presidential Search Committee to Hold Open ForumLeadershipPress Release
CSAC-and-Californias-Public-Higher-Education-Segments-Collaborate-to-Ease-Access-to-Financial-Aid.aspx
  
4/9/20244/9/2024 9:20 AMCalifornia Dream Act Applications will open to first-time financial aid applicants from mixed-status families to meet financial aid deadlines for Fall 2024.California Dream Act Applications will open to first-time financial aid applicants from mixed-status families to meet financial aid deadlines for Fall 2024.
A group of students sitting around a tree, some are working on a laptop.
California Student Aid Commission and California’s Public Higher Education Segments Collaborate to Ease Access to Financial AidFinancial AidPress Release
CSU-to-Receive-$1.5-Million-from-Mellon-Foundation-to-Expand-Ethnic-Studies-Pathways.aspx
  
3/28/20243/28/2024 9:55 AMThe CSU is one of five public universities selected to receive larger grants from Mellon’s Affirming Multivocal Humanities initiative. The CSU is one of five public universities selected to receive larger grants from Mellon’s Affirming Multivocal Humanities initiative.
A group of diverse students smiling and sitting together.
CSU to Receive $1.5 Million from Mellon Foundation to Expand Ethnic Studies PathwaysDiversityPress Release
Stanislaus-State-President-Appointed-2024.aspx
  
3/27/20243/27/2024 8:50 AMThe California State University Board of Trustees has appointed Britt Rios-Ellis to serve as president of California State University, Stanislaus.
woman smiling
Britt Rios-Ellis Appointed President of California State University, Stanislaus LeadershipPress Release
More-Than-$12.2-Million-in-Federal-Funds-Will-Benefit-CSU-Communities.aspx
  
3/11/20243/11/2024 10:40 AMCongressionally directed funding will advance research and initiatives with community impact across five universities.Congressionally directed funding will advance research and initiatives with community impact across five universities.
A group of students walking on campus with the copy "News Update" across the center.
More Than $12.2 Million in Federal Funds Will Benefit CSU CommunitiesResearchPress Release
CSU-Chancellor-Mildred-García-to-be-Honored-as-Women’s-HERstory-Maker.aspx
  
3/11/20243/11/2024 9:55 AMCalifornia Legislative Women’s Caucus recognizes García for groundbreaking achievements in honor of Women’s History Month. California Legislative Women’s Caucus recognizes García for groundbreaking achievements in honor of Women’s History Month.
chancellor garcia holding a plaque
CSU Chancellor Mildred García Honored as Women’s HERstory MakerChancellorPress Release
CSU-Summer-Arts-Program-Accepting-Student-Applications-2024.aspx
  
3/4/20243/4/2024 4:10 PMImmersive on-campus arts experiences at Fresno State and abroad offer rare opportunities for students to live and work with some of the best artists in their disciplines.Immersive on-campus arts experiences at Fresno State and abroad offer rare opportunities for students to live and work with some of the best artists in their disciplines.
Students dancing on stage as part of the CSU's Summer Arts program.
CSU Summer Arts Program Accepting Student ApplicationsCommunityPress Release
CSU-Named-as-Winner-of-The-Great-Admissions-Redesign-Challenge.aspx
  
2/29/20242/29/2024 3:55 PMCalifornia State University among just seven selected by Lumina Foundation in national competition to transform how students get into college.California State University among just seven selected by Lumina Foundation in national competition to transform how students get into college.
Students gathered together to take a picture on campus.
CSU Named as Winner of The Great Admissions Redesign ChallengeAdmissionPress Release
CSU-Statement-on-Student-Assistants-Vote-to-Join-Employees-Union.aspx
  
2/23/20242/23/2024 1:00 PM​California State University students who work on-campus jobs under the student assistant classification have voted to join the California State University Employees Union.
Student walking on campus with the copy "News Update" across the middle.
CSU Statement on Student Assistants Vote to Join Employees Union Collective BargainingPress Release
CSU-Statement-on-CFA-Vote-to-Ratify-Union-Contract.aspx
  
2/19/20242/19/2024 12:45 PMOn February 19, the CFA announced that its members had voted in favor of the tentative agreement reached with the CSU in January.
Dumke Auditorium with the copy "News Update" across it.
CSU Statement on California Faculty Association Vote to Ratify Union ContractCollective BargainingPress Release
CSU-Engages-Faith-Based-Partners-for-Super-Sunday-Outreach-in-February-and-Beyond.aspx
  
2/19/20242/19/2024 8:25 AMAnnual statewide events seek to inspire a college-going culture among African American youth.Annual statewide events seek to inspire a college-going culture among African American youth.
Three Black students side-by-side for a picture at graduation.
CSU Engages Faith-Based Partners for Super Sunday Outreach in February and BeyondStudent SuccessPress Release
CSU-statement-teamsters-vote-ratify-2024.aspx
  
2/16/20242/16/2024 5:15 PMThe following statement can be attributed to the California State University Office of the Chancellor
CSU Statement on Teamsters Local 2010 Vote to Ratify Union ContractCollective BargainingPress Release
CSU-Extends-Intent-to-Register-Deadline-Due-to-Federal-Aid-Processing-Delays.aspx
  
2/7/20242/7/2024 8:40 AMThe California State University has extended the intent to register deadline for fall 2024 for new first-time, first-year admitted students in response to the further delays in FAFSA.
Multiple students walking on campus with the copy "News Update" across the center.
CSU Extends Intent to Register Deadline Due to Federal Aid Processing DelaysApplyPress Release
Wang-Family-Excellence-Awards-2024.aspx
  
1/30/20241/30/2024 2:00 PMWang Family Excellence Awards honor exceptional contributions in teaching, scholarship and service to CSU students.Wang Family Excellence Awards honor exceptional contributions in teaching, scholarship and service to CSU students.
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CSU Awards Faculty and Staff for Commitment to Student SuccessFacultyPress Release
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CSU-Hill-Day-2024.aspx
  
4/16/20244/16/2024 12:00 PMUniversity and student leaders helped advance federal priorities to double Pell, increase aid to Minority-Serving Institutions and protect Dreamers.LeadershipStory
greg saks, Dominic Quan Treseler, mildred garcia, ted lieu, wenda fong, beth steffel
CSU Leaders Seek More Federal Support for College Students During ‘Hill Day’
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4/10/20244/10/2024 9:55 AMThe R2 Classification of the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education denotes doctoral universities with high levels of research activity.ResearchStory
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Seven CSUs Hold Prestigious Research Designation
CSU-Nursing-Pathways-Helping-Meet-Workforce-Demands.aspx
  
4/9/20244/9/2024 1:05 PMThe CSU’s nursing pathways help students complete their baccalaureate nursing education and join the workforce faster.NursingStory
Cal State San Bernardino nursing students checking on practice patient's vitals.
CSU Nursing Pathways: Helping Meet Workforce Demands
CSU-Launches-Tribal-Listening-Sessions.aspx
  
4/9/20244/9/2024 1:00 PMThe CSU last week launched the first of nine sessions in consultation with Tribes and Tribal representatives regarding the repatriation of Native American ancestors and cultural items.CommunityStory
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CSU Launches Tribal Listening Sessions
Chair-Chancellor-Share-Their-Journeys-to-Leadership.aspx
  
4/4/20244/4/2024 5:40 AMCSU Chancellor Mildred García and Board of Trustees Chair Wenda Fong shared stories and answered student questions at a special livestreamed event this week.LeadershipStory
wenda fong mildred garcia and Daisy Navarrete
Chair, Chancellor Share Their 'Journeys to Leadership'
CSU-gears-up-for-solar-eclipse.aspx
  
4/3/20244/3/2024 8:00 AMFrom a movie project to group viewings, read the ways faculty and students are getting involved in this rare celestial event. CommunityStory
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CSU Gears Up for Solar Eclipse
CSUSB-Hosts-Inaugural-Native-American-Indigenous-Education-Summit.aspx
  
3/28/20243/28/2024 2:55 PMThe event provided attendees a space to discuss challenges within higher education for Native communities.DiversityStory
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CSUSB Hosts Inaugural Native American/Indigenous Education Summit
CSU-Celebrates-the-Life-of-Stephen-Weber.aspx
  
3/26/20243/26/2024 3:45 PMFormer president of San Diego State University passes away at 82.LeadershipStory
Stephen Weber walking at a graduation ceremony.
CSU Celebrates the Life of Stephen L. Weber
Counted-Data-Collection-on-Student-Parents.aspx
  
3/25/20243/25/2024 1:50 PMTo comply with a recent California bill, the CSU is now collecting data on student parents—which will help the university better serve this group.Student SuccessStory
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Counted: Data Collection on Student Parents
Invest-in-CSU-Invest-in-CA-Communities.aspx
  
3/25/20243/25/2024 8:00 AMCSU chancellor calls for predictable funding in 2024-25 California state budget.BudgetStory
four people standing in front of a California flag
Invest in the CSU; Invest in California’s Future
Journeys-to-Leadership.aspx
  
3/21/20243/21/2024 10:45 AMThe live conversation on April 2 will highlight powerful stories of overcoming obstacles.LeadershipStory
chancellor mildred garcia and board of trustees chair wenda fong
chancellor mildred garcia and board of trustees chair wenda fong
“Journeys to Leadership” Event Will Feature CSU Chancellor, Chair
CSU-Hosts-Inaugural-Undocu-Student-Summit.aspx
  
3/20/20243/20/2024 11:15 AMThe Undocu Student Summit brought together more than 250 CSU students from across California.Student SuccessStory
CSU Hosts Inaugural Summit for Undocumented, Mixed-Status Students
A-Fresh-Approach-to-Student-Wellness.aspx
  
3/11/20243/11/2024 8:00 AMCSU CalFresh Outreach Weeks highlight the myriad ways the university addresses students’ basic needs.Basic Needs InitiativeStory
a smiling college student holding canned goods
A Fresh Approach to Supporting Student Wellness
women-leaders-of-the-csu.aspx
  
3/4/20243/4/2024 8:40 AMThe CSU celebrates its dedicated women leaders this Women’s History Month.LeadershipStory
chancellor garcia and cal state l a president berenecea johnson eanes
Women Leaders of the CSU
CSU-Reaches-Out-on-Super-Sunday-2024.aspx
  
2/27/20242/27/2024 2:40 PMUniversity leaders shared the benefits of a CSU degree with communities at more than 60 places of worship across California.Student SuccessStory
​CSU Chancellor Mildred García speaks at Faithful Central Bible Church in Inglewood
CSU Reaches Out on Super Sunday 2024
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