News
Go

Content is routinely updated to reflect additional information.​

Page Content
Page Image
Rollup Image
CSUs-Inspiring-Grads-of-2023.aspx
  
5/31/2023 11:40 AMRuble, Alisia5/30/20235/30/2023 8:55 PMOvercoming obstacles and making a positive impact are the stories of these six graduates in the Class of 2023.CommencementStory

​As the 2023 commencement season is in full swing, the California State University (CSU) celebrates graduates from all backgrounds and life experiences who are receiving their college degree​s​. For many, this accomplishment is the result of defeating the odds, overcoming obstacles and pursuing the change they want to see in the world.

With the CSU's support both inside and outside the classroom, these students have been able to discover their passions, grow in their knowledge and participate in opportunities that have prepared them for the next level in their educational or professional careers.

Meet just a few of the CSU's inspiring graduates from the Class of 2023 and learn how the university helped equip them to reach their goals for the future.

​​​

Ramadhan AhmedRamadhan Ahmed smiling in a navy suit.

Cal State Fulle​rton

Bachelor of Science Degree in​ Biological Sciences

Immigrating to California from East Africa when he was five years old, Ramadhan Ahmed is the first in his family to earn both high school and college degrees, graduating summa cum laude with a 3.91 GPA.

​“The chances of me being here are nearly impossible," Ahmed said in a Cal State Fullerton news story. “I was born in the rural village of Wajir, Kenya, where most of the land is covered in sand and the nearest city, Nairobi, is a 12-hour bus ride away."​

During his time at Cal State Fullerton, he was involved in the Bridges to​ Stem Cell Research ​program​ and mentored two community college students in Project RAISE ​(Regional Alliance in STEM Education). He also worked several jobs to support himself and volunteered for such organizations as StandUp for Kids Orange County.​

For his scholarly achievements and community service, Ahmed was named the Alumni Association's Outstanding Senior. The honor comes with a $1,000 award.

Reading Malcolm X's autobiography​ greatly inspired Ahmed's decision to become a doctor. He developed a habit of asking himself: “What can I do for others?"

“I believed that medicine was the career that fit me the best, so I started delving into experiences that would help me confirm that belief," Ahmed​ said. “The power and beauty of medicine stems from the fact that its practice can touch many lives, not just that of your patient."

In August, Ahmed will begin his first year of medical school at The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine with a full-ride scholarship that includes tuition and living expenses. He was offered a total of 12 scholarships, six of which were full rides.

Read more about Ahmed in the CSUF Ne​wsroom.


​Michelle GradowitzMichelle Gradowitz smiling with the CSUB President's medal around her neck.

Cal State Bakersfield

Master of Arts Degree in Social Work

Michelle Gradowitz was recently awarded the President's Medal at Cal State Bakersfield and recognized as the university's top graduate student for the Class of 2023. After stepping back from her pursuit of higher education for more than two decades, Gradowitz decided to put her career on pause after the birth of the first of her three daughters.

She spent much of that time working for the Kern County Department of Human Services in several areas, including in ​​​Child Protective Services. The abuse and neglect she saw persuaded her to devote herself to her growing family. 

“During that time, I found that I liked to keep busy, so I started a food pantry and eventually returned to the Department of Human Services," Gradowitz said in a Cal State Bakersfield news story​. "I was there for two years and decided to get my Master of Social Work (MSW) degree."

While completing the MSW program at CSUB, Gradowitz also helped care for her brother who was in hospice. He died about a month after her return to school, and the experie​nce shattered her.

“That's when I started rethinking things. He was only 53. I just thought: 'If I really want something, I should go for it and do it now,'" Gradowitz said. "Then in my second year, my mother's lung cancer returned. So, with the help of my husband, I decided to devote myself to my studies, and he carried the load financially."

Despite the demands of bei​ng a mother and caregiver, Gradowitz organized several initiatives while at CSUB that benefited the community and her fellow social work students. She led a drive to collect goody bags for foster children last December and worked with Drug Free Kern to provide Narcan training for students, who are now able to administer the life-saving drug to overdose victims in the community.

On June 5, Gradowitz will join Clinica Sierra Vista as a Healthcare for Homeless therapist, working with the community health center's street medicine team in serving the homeless in encampments around the city.

Read more about Gradowitz in the CSUB N​ewsroom​.


Natalie CastilloNatalia Castillo smiling in a black sweater.

CSUN​

Bachelor of Science Degrees in Biology and Central American Studies

Natalie Castillo came to California State University, Northridge in 2018 as a first-generation college student and has since become a role model for young, underrepresented students in STEM. She recently graduated from CSUN with bachelor's degrees in biology and Central American studies.

Named this year's Wolfson Scholar, the top honor given to a graduating senior, Castillo has an exceptional academic record and has made significant contributions to CSUN and the community through co-curricular and extracurricular activities.

During her time at CSUN, Castillo was heavily involved in research on the invasive Brown Widow spider and presented her research at CSUN and at regional and international conferences​​. She was awarded the CSUN NSP Presidential Scholarship​ two years in a row, which supported her research. Last summer, Castillo researched the potential effects of climate change on Andean pollinators in Colombia, work that was funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Though she was a full-time student, Castillo helped support her family with work as a tutor and as an assisted living coach for adults with intellectual disabilities. These additional responsibilities did not interfere with her academic success as she held a 3.96 GPA in her double major while also volunteering in the biology department.

Castillo plans to eventually enter a Ph.D. program in entomology, where she hopes to further explore biological control of pests and vector-borne diseases.

“Hopefully I can do research in Central America and apply everything I've learned at CSUN to make a difference in communities where there is great need," Castillo said in a CSUN news story.

Read more about Castillo in CSUN Today.


Sofia RosalesSofia Rosales smiling in her Cal Poly Pomona cap and gown.

Cal Poly Pomona​

Bachelor of Arts Degree in Political Science

The first in her family to obtain a college degree, Sofia Rosales believes that a good education opens doors to making a difference in the community.

Rosales earned her bachelor's degree in political science, along with a minor in psychology, and will be pursuing her Ph.D. this fall at Michigan State University. She r​eceived a full scholarship for a program that is only accepting five students this year.

Beyond her academic accomplishments, Rosales​ has demonstrated a clear commitment to doing good deeds. Over the past two years, she has spent her time interning at the Food in Need of Distribution (FIND) Food Bank​, where she assisted low-income families in accessing essential food resources.

She served as a mentor in Cal Poly Pomona's ​Bronco Navigators Program, and helped guide freshman and transfer students ​through their educational journeys.​

Rosales also taught an "Introduction to Autobiography Writing" class at the California Institution for Women as part of the Prison Education Project (PEP)​,​ ​the largest volunteer-based prison education program in the United States.​

She hopes to continue to make a positive impact on society in the future.

Read more about Rosales in the Fontana Herald News.


Joseph ValadezJoseph Valadez posing with sunglasses on in his CSULB cap and gown.

Cal State Long Beach​

Master of Arts Degree in Applied Sociology

Joseph Valadez spent most of his adolescent years addicted to drugs and in and out of juvenile facilities, but this spring he earned his second degree from Cal State Long Beach.

At age 18, after graduating from high school, he was offered the option to join the military or go to prison. Valadez spent four years in the U.S. Army before he was honorably discharged, after which he resumed his previous behavior. Throughout the following 30 years, he found himself still struggling with addiction and was in and out of prison.

Valadez began his journey of r​ecovery over 10 years ago, and almost nine years ago, his educational journey. Starting at Orange Coast College in Costa Mesa, California, Valadez transferred to CSULB in 2018 and graduated with his bachelor's degree in sociology in 2020.

While at The Beach, he got involved in Project Rebound, a program that recruits and supports formerly incarcerated students looking to advance their education at the ​CSU. 

During Valadez' l​ast two years in undergrad, he made straight A's and was placed on the President's Honor List his final two semesters, finishing with a 3.67 GPA. 

Now having obtained his Master of Social Work (MSW) degree, Valadez will start his employment with an organization that works with system-impacted adolescents, formerly incarcerated young adults and older adults.

“This is my dream job, to give back to the community that I had robbed for so many years." Valadez said in a​ Cal State Long Beach article​. "I really do have a life beyond my comprehension."

Read more about Valadez in CSULB's "Beach ​Voic​es."


 ​​

Nina Chuang​Nina Chuang smiling on campus at SJSU.

San José State

Bachelor of Science Degree in Nutrition and Food Science​​

When Nina Chuang started her freshman year at San José State, she longed to find a physical space that would allow her to feel safe and be authentically herself. But when she arrived on campus, she soon realized that space simply didn't exist.

It wasn't until 2019, when she joined Associated Students (AS) during her second year as a College of Health and Human Sciences representative, that she began to align to a deep purpose. Since then, Chuang has driven numerous efforts to support students and effect change on campus. She was elected director of student resources affairs in her third year, vice president of AS during her fourth year; and in June 2022, Chuang officially took the reins as student body president.  

One of her proudest achievements is having worked with students, staff and faculty to advocate and lay down the vision for a center that would serve as an empowering space for students who identify as Asian Pacific Islander Desi American (APIDA).

In fall 2022, the Center for Asian Pacific Islander Student Empowerment (CAPISE) opened its doors for the first time and the safe space Chuang had been searching for finally came to life.

“The advocacy for CAPISE has actually been happening for a long time," Chuang said in a San José State news story​. “It started during the third world liberation movement in 1968 and 1969, where student activists here at SJSU were advocating for ethnic studies and a space on campus."

In alignment with her passion for advocacy, Chuang also played an instrumental role in the planning of SJSU's inaugural Day of Remembrance, which received a great deal of support and media attention in February. 

Chuang also introduced a Sense of Senate resolution — a​ call for SJSU to instit​utionalize the Day of Remembrance. By making this day a permanent fixture on campus, Chu​ang hopes to see future students carry on the work that she and others have started.​

Read more about Chuang at​ the ​​​​​SJSU NewsCenter.


Special thanks to ​campus writers and photographers:​ ​Lynn Juliano, Jennifer Self, James Burger, Albert Baker,​ Rhoda Shapiro​​​​​.​​​

Joseph Valadez posing with sunglasses on in his CSULB graduation cap and gown.
CSU’s Inspiring Grads of 2023
Statement-on-Cozen-Systemwide-Title-IX-and-DHR-Assessment.aspx
  
5/30/2023 2:15 PMThropay, Janessa5/24/20235/24/2023 10:05 AM​The following statement can be attributed to CSU Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester:​ "I state this in the strongest and most unequivocal terms: The CSU is committed to this work."LeadershipStory

The following statement can be attributed to CSU Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester:​

“I thank Cozen O'Connor's Institutional Response Group for its methodical, inclusive and comprehensive assessment of the California State University's implementation of​ Title IX and other anti-discrimination programs across our 23 universities and at the Chancellor's Office.

I also thank the many CSU employees who supported Cozen's work on our university campuses and at the system office.

But most important, I offer my heartfelt gratitude and appreciation to the many CSU students, faculty and staff who – courageously and, undoubtedly, sometimes painfully – provided their input to help guide this critically important work.

As is often the case with honest, frank and unflinching self-reflection, some of the findings were uncomfortable and difficult to hear. Many of the report's recommendations are challenging and complex, influenced by a multitude of interconnected factors, including deep-rooted and underlying societal issues.

It is clear: This work will take time. It will take significant resources. And it will require the Chancellor's Office to reconsider its role in terms of its oversight and support of our universities in this regard. I'll provide just one example on this point. It is evident that allegations made against campus executive leadership must be referred to the Chancellor's Office.

While the work will indeed be difficult, it also presents a unique and invaluable opportunity to strengthen our culture of compliance and our culture of care as we strive to create and sustain safe, welcoming and inclusive environments across the CSU, where students, faculty and staff can thrive personally, professionally and intellectually, free from discrimination, harassment and sexual misconduct.

I state this in the strongest and most unequivocal terms: The CSU is committed to this work. The systemwide and university recommendations outlined in the full report to be published in the coming weeks will provide a vital and necessary path forward, and they will hold us accountable to our commitment. But make no mistake, to bring about meaningful, authentic and sustainable change, the entire Cal State community – trustees, Chancellor's Office and university leadership, Title IX and DHR professionals, faculty, staff, students, alumni, friends and supporters – must walk this path together.

We will not squander this opportunity. We will get this right. The CSU's mission and core values demand it."


CSU Title I​X website

CSU Systemwide Assessment by Cozen O'Connor website 


About the California State University

The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, nearly 460,000 students, and 56,000 faculty and staff. Nearly 40 percent of the CSU's undergraduate students transfer from California Community Colleges. The CSU was created in 1960 with a mission of providing high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards nearly 130,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.​

Chancellor's Office with the copy "Chancellor Statement" across the middle.
Statement on Cozen O'Connor Board of Trustees Presentation on Systemwide Title IX and DHR Assessment
CSU-Trustees-Appoint-Presidents-of-Chico-State-Sacramento-State-and-Sonoma-State.aspx
  
5/25/2023 9:21 AMThropay, Janessa5/24/20235/24/2023 8:35 AM​The California State University Board of Trustees has appointed , Stephen Perez to serve as president of Chico State, J. Luke Wood as president of Sacramento State and Ming-Tung "Mike" Lee to serve as president of Sonoma State.LeadershipPress Release

The California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees has announced three presidential appointments. Stephen Perez has been named president of California State University, Chico, J. Luke Wood has been appointed president at Sacramento State and Ming-Tung “Mike" Lee will serve as the permanent president at Sonoma State University.

Perez currently serves as interim provost and vice president of Academic Affairs at Chico State. He will become the university's 13th president and will succeed Gayle E. Hutchinson.

Wood currently is vice president for Student Affairs and Campus Diversity and chief diversity officer at San Diego State University. He will become Sacramento State's ninth permanent president, succeeding Robert S. Nelsen.

Lee has served as Sonoma State's interim president since August 2022. He assumes the permanent position immediately.

Perez will begin his appointment on July 1, and Wood's first day will be July 16.

 

Read the full press releases:

Stephen Perez Appointed President of California State University, Chico​

J. Luke Wood Appointed President of California State University, Sacramento

Ming-Tung “Mike" Lee Appointed Pre​side​nt of Sonoma State University

From left to right: Stephen Perez, J. Luke Wood, and Ming-Tung "Mike" Lee, smiling in profile photos that are side by side.
Left to right: Stephen Perez, J. Luke Woods and Ming-Tung "Mike" Lee
CSU Trustees Appoint Presidents of Chico State, Sacramento State and Sonoma State
CSU-Trustee-Spotlight-Wenda-Fong.aspx
  
5/26/2023 9:52 AMRuble, Alisia5/22/20235/22/2023 8:00 AMThe university’s first Asian American woman to serve as chair of the CSU Board of Trustees shares stories and lessons from her leadership journey.LeadershipStory

You may think sitting on the board of a public university is a far cry from working in the entertainment industry, but there is one similarity—the jam-packed schedule. Whether attending a board meeting, participating in leadership interviews, meeting with students or sharing the California State University's impact with legislators in the nation's capital, Wenda Fong is full of energy and passion.

“Every day is CSU!" she says with a wide smile.

Throughout her life, Fong has been an advocate for Asian American and other marginalized communities through her 40-plus-year career in the entertainment industry, and since 2018, through her service to higher education as a member of the CSU Board of Trustees.

“Since high school, I worked to raise representation and visibility of Asian Pacific Islander Desi Americans," Fong says. “My work in diversity, equity and inclusion has been a parallel career as I worked in the entertainment industry, and I am deeply honored and grateful for the privilege to now serve the CSU."

Fong's trajectory to higher education leadership began 120 years ago when her grandparents immigrated to California from China. Her grandparents all made sacrifices to support their families and to provide them with better opportunities, like her maternal grandfather who even worked four jobs as a cook.

Growing up, Fong's mother, Margaret Choy Fong, would often tell her the reason her grandparents left China was so that their children and grandchildren would not have to lift anything heavier than a pencil.

“Higher education changes lives; it changes entire family trees," Fong says. “My grandparents' hardships and backbreaking work resulted in their granddaughter being given the opportunity to serve as the first Asian American chair of the CSU Board of Trustees—can you imagine how proud they would be to know that?" 

HONORING PAST AND PRESENT

In addition to being a proud first-generation American, Fong's mother celebrated her Chinese heritage and instilled the​ same sense of admiration in her five children. She taught them about Chinese traditions and customs in tandem with​a black and white photo of a mother and her five small childrenWenda Fong (center) with her mother, Margaret Choy Fong (right), and siblings.  American ones, celebrating the Chinese New Year as passionately as the Fourth of July holiday. She also taught them to ​ revere Ching Ming—a day to remember and honor deceased relatives. ​

Fong says conversations with her mother were sprinkled with tidbits that were lessons in respect for her Chinese culture. When prompted by a subject, she would proudly list the myriad inventions by the Chinese such as paper, the compass, printing, fireworks and paper money.

“She also told me stories about my grandparents and my father that filled me with enormous pride, but also sometimes sadness and anger. Stories about their sacrifices, hard work and perseverance to overcome and succeed in the face of obstacles like racism, and laws like the Chinese Exclusion Act."

From an early age, Fong loved to watch television and was an avid movie goer. But she quickly became aware of the lack of Asian influence in the entertainment industry. Fong would often make her mother stay with her to watch a movie's closing credits to seek out Asian names. There often weren't any, she says, and if there were, many times the roles were quite small and even harmful to the characterization of Asian people.

Fong eventually co-founded Asian Americans for Fair Media to help combat these negative depictions, and she and other members would write letters or make calls to movie studios when they saw a negative depiction of an Asian character. And, later in life, she says whenever she had an opportunity to hire people, she made sure there was a diverse selection.

She continues to use her influence to change the perception of the APIDA community. In 2021, Fong produced a public service announcement (PSA) to combat anti-Asian hate that included leading actors like Ken Jeong, and an A-list production team who joined her in volunteering their time, talent and more. The PSA played in AMC Theatres across the country for the month of May, and it was so popular that AMC decided to run it again this May.

​​​Lorem ipsum dolor sit ametWenda Fong ​working as the producer of a television special, "Opening the Lost Tombs: Live from Egypt," in 1999. ​After getting her start as the host of her own live talk show series in Los Angeles, Fong went on to produce and direct musical variety and reality specials, awards shows, sitcoms, talk shows, documentaries and even live events—launching productions across the United States and around the world, including China, Canada, Europe and Africa.

​She has worked with luminaries such as President Barack Obama, Beyoncé​, Bruno Mars, Michael Jackson, Taylor Swift, Madonna, Harry Styles, Lady Gaga and even Elvis Presley. She also holds the dual distinction of being the first person of color and first woman to have produced the Emmy Awards—a feat that wasn't seen again until 30 years later.

Of her career, Fong says: “It's been an extraordinary adventure—one beyond my wildest dreams." And one that required an extreme level of dedication and commitment. ​

STANDING OUT

Like any pioneer inevitably does, Fong faced some challenges. At the beginning of her career in 1974 and for many years, she was the only Asian American woman working on the set.  She clearly stood out.

“I felt a responsibility to my community," Fong says. “I had to stand tall and be aware of how I carried myself because I knew that I was being judged for all Asian people."​​

Fong also experienced gender discrimination and was even passed over for a job as the producer of a new sitcom after the showrunner told her point-blank that he was uncomfortable working with a woman.

“I actually learned a lot from people who put up barriers—who made things very difficult for me—and I learned how to overcome challenges," she says.

The barriers she faced inspired her to create her own support networks, including the Coalition of Asian Pacifics in Entertainment (CAPE), which began in 1991 and is the largest, longest-running and one of the most influential organizations​ for APIDAs in the entertainment industry.

“Being the first and only inspired me to help others follow me and climb onto my shoulders," she says. “It's why I co-founded CAPE and the Asian American Committee for the Directors Guild of America, and why I left producing to launch the Creative Diversity Development Department at the Fox Broadcasting Company."

While in her role at Fox, Fong launched a writers assistant program as an entry into the writer pipeline and, specifically, into the hallowed and all-important writers room.

“I am so proud that several of those diverse writers assistants did well and were hired permanently and moved up the ladder," Fong says. “Several became producers, and one is a very successful and well-respected showrunner." 

FROM HOLLYWOOD TO THE BOARDROOM

While Fong may have been slightly surprised at her appointment to the CSU Board of Trustees in 2018, she is thrilled and grateful for the opportunity.

“When I say that this is the greatest honor and privilege of my life—advancing the CSU's mission to elevate lives and communities through the transformative power of higher education—I truly mean it."​​Lorem ipsum dolor sit ametWenda Fong (right) and Interim CSU Chancellor Jolene Koester supporting San Diego State's men's basketball team at an NCAA National Championship game.

The Board of Trustees is responsible for the oversight of the CSU, adopting rules, regulations and policies governing the​​​​ university. It is made up of 25 members, 16 of whom (including Fong) are appointed by the governor. And it's an unpaid position. No trustee—except for the chancellor and the faculty trustee—receives any salary for their service.​​​

During her time as a member, vice chair and chair of the Board of Trustees, Fong has helped to advance educational equity, and she is proud of the progress the university has made regarding support for APIDA and other​underrepresented students.​

Most recently, the CSU celebrated the opening of the university's newest APIDA Student Center at Sacramento State in February and announced the establishment of the CSU Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander (AANHPI) Student Achievement Program in April.

“This [progress] is reflective of the CSU's broader goal to help all of our students establish a sense of well-being and belonging on their campus where they can be successful and progress to graduation, so they can join the over four million living alumni who are making a positive impact in their communities, in our state and for our nation."

Never one to be afraid of standing out, Fong is easy to spot at the bimonthly meetings of the CSU Board of Trustees. She's colorfully clad in professional attire, and her warm smile and positive attitude brighten any room. Fong says she hopes she is a role model worthy of inspiring California's college students.

“If you can see it, you can be it," she says. “That's the message I hope to convey—as a woman and as an Asian American—to the students of the CSU."

 

Read Chair Fong's biography to learn more about her career accomplishments and her contributions to the CSU.​​​​​



a group of smiling college students with an administrator
CSU Trustee Spotlight: Wenda Fong
5-CSU-Commencement-Addresses-Worth-Rewatching.aspx
  
5/15/2023 9:13 AMRuble, Alisia5/15/20235/15/2023 8:40 AMRevisit these historic speeches that proved to be crowd pleasers.CommencementStory

5 CSU Commencemen​t Addresses Worth Rewatching

Revisit these historic speeches that proved to be crowd pleasers.​

 

Envision yourself awash in a sea of thousands of your fellow students—perched on a folding chair atop a lush lawn or tucked into stadium seats in a massive arena. Exhaustion and excitement coalesce into pride as you wait patiently for your turn to cross the stage and commemorate this momentous achievement. But, first, a speech.

Each spring, college commencement planners invite prominent public figures to deliver a bit of advice, a subtle warning, or even a life lesson to graduating student​s. These speakers aim to inspire graduates as they prepare to use the knowledge gained at the CSU to make their mark on the state and nation.

As we kick off the 2023 commencement season, w​e revisit a few historic addresses from CSU commencement ceremonies. ​

5 CSU Commencement Addresses Worth Rewatching
CSU-Statement-on-Governors-May-Revision-2023-24-Budget-Proposal.aspx
  
5/12/2023 10:27 AMThropay, Janessa5/12/20235/12/2023 9:15 AMCalifornia Governor Gavin Newsom announced the May Revision of his administration's 2023-24 state budget proposal, including funding for the California State University.BudgetPress Release

California Governor Gavin Newsom announced the May Revision of his administration's 2023-24 state budget proposal, including funding for the California State University (CSU). The May Revision maintains the same level of additional unallocated, ongoing funding for the CSU—$227.3 million—that the governor had proposed in January as part of the multi-year compact.

“We are very grateful for the ongoing support of the CSU represented in the revised budget proposal, especially given the state's worsening fiscal challenges," said Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester. “By maintaining the commitments of the multi-year compact, the administration has demonstrated its belief in the CSU's mission and the transformative power of higher education for Californians from all backgrounds."



About the California State University

The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, nearly 460,000 students, and 56,000 faculty and staff. Nearly 40 percent of the CSU's undergraduate students transfer from California Community Colleges. The CSU was created in 1960 with a mission of providing high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards nearly 130,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.​

Image of California's Capitol Building with copy "Budget News" across the front.
CSU Statement on Governor’s May Revision 2023-24 Budget Proposal
APIDA-Heritage-Month-2023.aspx
  
5/12/2023 10:20 AMRuble, Alisia5/8/20235/8/2023 8:00 AMThe CSU recognizes Asian Pacific Islander Desi American (APIDA) Heritage Month.DiversityStory

Comprising one of the most diverse student populations in the nation, the California State University encourages students to embrace the rich culture and heritage they bring with them as sources of individuality and strength. This, in turn, helps further the university's mission to prepare all students for a multicultural society and workplace.

CSU has also established programs, initiatives and partnerships with the local community to increase enrollment and retention of students from historically underrepresented backgrounds and help them realize their dream of earning a life-changing degree.

One way the university helps Asian Pacific Islander Desi American (APIDA) students succeed is through the establishment of dedicated support centers that provide culturally responsive services and support to increase students' sense of belonging.

The CSU also recently established the CSU Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander (AANHPI) Student Achievement Program. The new program, which will be housed at Sacramento State, seeks to enhance student educational experiences and promote higher education success for underserved and first-generation AANHPI and other underrepresented students. 

And, fourteen campuses are federally designated as Asian American and Native​ American Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions (AANAPISIs), which enables them to apply for grant and funding opportunities that strengthen academic programming and support for students from traditionally underserved communities. About 17 percent of CSU students identify as APIDA, many of whom also identify as first-generation college students.

 

​​performers doing a dragon dance

​​​​Sacramento​ State's new APIDA Student Center celebrated its grand opening with speeches, tours and entertainment such as dancing dragons. (Photo courtesy of Sacramento State/Bibiana Ortiz)​

​Stingers Up! 

Sacramento State celebrated the grand opening of its APIDA Student Center in February 2023, one of a dozen such campus facilities across the CSU. The center educates and engages with students to foster holistic, academic and personal development to raise cultural awareness and advocacy needs.

“The mission of the APIDA Center is to foster students' academic and personal growth and serve as a hub of campus connections and community resources," says Chao Vang, Ed.D., director of educational equity access and equity strategist at Sacramento State.

The center builds on the tradition of Sacramento State's Full Circle Project and Project HMONG, existing programs that support APIDA students. At the center, students can receive help transitioning to college, referrals for resources on and off campus and referrals to graduate schools, among other services.

Dr. Vang says the center helps advance the university's diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) initiatives and provides a place for the exchange of cultures. Staff plan and host events geared towards APIDA students that include a welcome week, a leadership summit and a speaker series as well as outreach events like APIDA Fest that invite the entire university community to learn about and celebrate APIDA culture.

Andrew Yang, who serves as the APIDA Center coordinator and student academic success counselor, says the center also serves as a centralized location for academic and career mentorship, professional development and health and well-being.

“Students tend to feel more comfortable seeking support services when they know there are individuals who come from similar backgrounds as them, especially when it comes to mental health—a taboo subject in all APIDA cultures," Yang says. “One of the unique things we're doing is working with our Student Health & Counseling Services (SHCS) to provide an in-house counselor who will be here every Tuesday."

 

​​

Sacramento State ​​​​​​APIDA Student Center coordinators were intentional about choosing art for the space that celebrates the diversity of APIDA culture. (Photo courtesy of Sacramento State/Chao Vang, Ed.D.)​

​Laying the Groundwork

“We couldn't have done this without the leadership of [Sacramento State] President Robert Nelsen, Vice President of Student Affairs Ed Mills, Ph.D., and Associate Vice President for Student Retention & Academic Success Marcellene Watson-Derbigny, Ed.D., but really the groundwork was laid by faculty, students and staff," Vang says.

Conversations started about two years ago amongst 20 faculty and staff and an advisory group of about 30 students from different majors and different APIDA groups.

“We performed a student needs assessment to learn what they wanted in the center and discovered the most important things were to have a space to build community and to seek professional and peer-to-peer mentorship," Yang says.

The planning committee also held two round tables to gather feedback on what the surrounding community wanted, because, according to Vang, “while the center mainly serves students, the success of it will also be the support of the community."

More than 300 students, employees and community members attended the grand opening event in February despite pouring rain. And the community is excited for what is to come, Yang says.

“Since the center opened in February, we've received hundreds of phone calls from alumni, community partners and even potential students and parents looking to learn more about the center's work and how to get involved. It's a testament to the commitment of our community who wants to leverage their expertise and resources in support of student success here at Sacramento State."

 

​​t

​​​​Hundreds of students from Sacramento-area high schools and middle schools visited Sacramento State in March for APIDA College Day. (Photo courtesy of Sacramento State/Belen Torres)

​​Being Inclusive 

The term APIDA encompasses people from more than 40 countries who speak multiple languages and dialects and recognize different traditions. Center administrators say they want to amplify and appreciate that diversity and provide culturally responsive services, but they also want to form a united front.

“Helping a first-generation Vietnamese student is very different from helping a fifth-generation Chinese or Korean American student," Vang says. “One of the biggest challenges is understanding the role their cultural identity plays—the intersectionality of being a member of their community as well as a college student."

The APIDA community is the fastest-growing ethnic group in the City of Sacramento and grew 40 percent over the last 10 years to more than 97,000 residents. Center staff say they recognize their role in not only serving current students, but also in building additional capacity for future APIDA students.​ 

The university has also experienced this growth and now enrolls nearly 7,000 students who identify as APIDA. Vang attributes the increase in enrollment, in part, to the university's K-12 outreach and events like APIDA College Day, which happens every spring and has grown to become one of the larger P​​an-Asian outreach events in the Sacramento area. 

The daylong event, designed to promote early awareness of college for APIDA students, attracted about 700 scholars this March, representing six school districts in the Sacramento area. 





Learn more about the CSU's work to support Asian Pacific Islander Desi American (APIDA) student success and find ways to celebrate APIDA Heritage Month at CSU campuses across the state.

four smiling college students
Cultural Connections
CalState-CREATE-student-competition-2023.aspx
  
5/4/2023 11:32 AMKelly, Hazel5/4/20235/4/2023 8:50 AM'You Belong Here' was the theme of the virtual creative event for CSU students across the system.Student SuccessStory

From April 5 through April 19, 2023, students, staff and alumni from across the California State University community participated in the first-ever Cal State CREATE—a virtual event and competition in collaboration with Adobe and Apple. Similar to Adobe Creative Jams, Cal State CREATE invited CSU students to explore what it means to belong in unique digital projects designed using Adobe creative tools. 

The kickoff event opened with a welcome by CSU Board of Trustees Chair Wenda Fong, followed by keynote speakers Michael J. Payton and Christopher J. Moore, both CSU alumni who are active in the film and TV industries. The opening speakers each shared their experiences with belonging as they navigated their creative career journeys after college. After the inspirational opening speeches, Adobe design professionals hosted design bootcamps to give participants a foundation in the creative tools needed to complete their competition deliverable—a single webpage created with Adobe Express telling their own story of finding belonging.

Cal State CREATE received more than 50 entries from both individual students and groups. Submissions were reviewed by a team of volunteer judges from the CSU, Adobe and Apple who evaluated projects on visual storytelling, design elements and format.

​​graphic for Cal State CREATE 2023 event: You Belong Here | a creative event and competition in collaboration with Adobe and Appl

The event concluded on April 19th with a closing ceremony to announce the winners and highlight the diverse ways student participants depicted belonging. Jessica Nare, San Diego State's associate vice president for Community and Belonging, and Dilcie Perez, Ed.D, CSU associate vice chancellor of Student Affairs, Equity and Belonging, reflected on themes from the student submissions and personal anecdotes on belonging and community. Faith Sidlow, associate professor in the Department of Media at Fresno State, announced the student competition winners. 

Here are the winners and a breif description of their work:


First place: “To My Self" by Juan Carlos Mosqueda Rosales | Fresno State

Rosales explores a non-traditional sense of belonging as a Dreamer and undocumented student, illustrating the challenges and loss of family and community. In the piece, he writes, “Although I might not share in the traditional sense of 'belonging,' I am assured by the sense of belonging to my self." 


Second place: “How I Found Belonging at Cal Poly as a Queer Woman of Color" by Anusha Sowda | Cal Poly San Luis Obispo

Art and design student Sowda explores her personal identity and shares how working with Cal Poly's Student Diversity & Belonging collective empowered her to find her own voice and help build community for other students. In the piece, Sowda writes, “I know that wherever I go from here, there will be a place for me. I took an active role in creating one, here at Cal Poly, and proved to myself that if I am authentically myself, I will always be okay."


Third place (tied): “Where Do I Belong?" by Imani McEwan | CSU Dominguez Hills

McEwan shares how she found her own style and her own people and decided to stop hiding who she was. “After all these years of creeping, I've recently been able to walk proud knowing I belong to people who actually want me around. I finally belong somewhere," she writes in the piece. 


Third place (tied): “Asian-American Artists United" by Samuel Louie, Katie Tam and Lyndsey Park | Cal Poly San Luis Obispo

In this visual diary, three Cal Poly graphic design students explore how they each have different stories, different cultures, yet share the same dream. “Our passion for designing and connecting with others allowed us to find our sense of belonging, community and togetherness."


Prizes for the winning entries included Apple AirPods Pro (first place), Adobe-branded swag and Amazon gift cards.

“We are grateful for the collaborative partnerships with Adobe and Apple and to CSU colleagues who helped to plan and promote the event, and hope to host the event again next spring," said Kate Miffitt, director of ITS Innovation at the CSU Chancellor's Office and lead coordinator for the event by Cal State Innovate.

 

Learn more about how the CSU supports student success and a sense of belonging as part of Graduation Initiative 2025.

three students sitting with laptops
Inaugural Cal State CREATE Student Competition Celebrates a Sense of Belonging
CSU-Recognized-for-Promoting-Mental-Health-Literacy.aspx
  
5/4/2023 10:46 AMThropay, Janessa5/2/20235/2/2023 3:45 PMMental Health First Aid training has equipped more than 600 faculty members to become allies for students. WellnessStory

The National Council of Mental Wellbeing honored the California State University with the Mental Health First Aid Momentum Award on April 30, 2023, for its work in accelerating positive community change through education and faculty-led support for those experiencing mental health challenges.

Using the council's Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) training program, a group of dedicated CSU faculty have trained over 600 of their colleagues systemwide to become mental health allies for students, equipping them to identify, understand and respond to symptoms of mental health and substance use challenges.

“On college campuses, teaching and caring for the whole student have sometimes been separa​te activities. Mental Health First Aid—taught by faculty for faculty—is enabling us to foster a culture of caring," said Emily Magruder, Ph.D., CSU's director of Innovative Teaching and Future Faculty Development, who accepted the MHFA Momentum Award on behalf of the CSU.

three women standing on stage

From left: Tramaine El-Amin of the National Council of Mental Wellbeing, Emily Magruder of the CSU Chancellor's Office and Deanna Roepke of the National Council of Mental Wellbeing​.​ 

Much like first aid training, the MHFA program prepares lay people to aid individuals in distress until they can be connected to professional help. In addition to reducing the stigma around mental health, the curriculum teaches participants how to respond to common mental health and substance use issues that can be exacerbated by the high-stress environment of college, while also equipping them to assist students in finding social support and resources for recovery within and beyond their campus community.​​

“The whole idea is to enable faculty to feel that they can intervene. They can deescalate. They can have de-stigmatizing conversations and they can get that person to the appropriate professional to find the help that they need," said MHFA-certified trainer Bonnie Gasior, Ph.D., in a 2021 Calstate.edu article. ​​

Gasior, a professor of Spanish at Cal State Long Beach, along with CSU San Marcos modern language studies professor Darci Strother, Ph.D., and Cal State ​San Bernardino psychology instructor Sailesh Maharjan, first introduced the program to the CSU in 2020.​​​​​Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet From l​eft: Emily Magruder of the CSU Chancellor's Office, Darci Strother of CSU San Marcos, Bonnie Gasior of Cal State Long Beach and Sailesh Maharjan of ​​ Cal State San Bernardino.

Due to the high demand for MHFA training across the system, the CSU's Innovative Teaching and Learning Programs (ITLP) expanded the trainings in 2021-22 by increasing the number of faculty instructors to meet the need of those interested in participating in the developmental sessions. With a completion rate close to 100 percent, CSU faculty have demonstrated a clear desire to increase their mental health literacy and provide support to students who may be struggling in this way.​​

Each CSU campus offers Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) for students who may be facing difficulties with their mental health. But some may initially seek a more familiar confidant, such as an instructor, to begin talking about their mental health. In light of this, MHFA-certified faculty help to strengthen the university's mental health and substance use safety-net systems.​

Supporting students' well-being is critical for student success and is an operational priority of Graduation Initiative 2025, the university-wide effort to increase graduation rates for all CSU students while eliminating opportunity and achievement gaps.

 

MHFA training has empowered CSU faculty to be ​advocates of students' mental health and well-being. Learn more about how the CSU supports students' basic needs.

CSU Channel Island student volunteer smiling at Involvement Fair
CSU Recognized for Promoting Mental Health Literacy
Get-Ready-for-Commencement-2023.aspx
  
5/1/2023 9:04 AMBeall, Alex5/1/20235/1/2023 3:55 PMSee how CSU commencement ceremonies will celebrate this year’s graduates.CommencementStory

As the spring semester once again comes to an end, the California State University prepares to honor more than 100,000​ graduates across its 23 campuses, recognizing their academic achievements, extracurricular accomplishments, service work and perseverance.

“This celebration marks a new beginning for you—a time to commence a new life, filled with opportunities and prospects made possible by your degree from the California State University,​” Interim CSU Chancellor Jolene Koester says. “I ask that—in the Cal State spirit—you use the knowledge, skills and personal qualities you have developed to work for justice, seek opportunities to foster equity and always uplift and empower ​others.”​


Check each campus​’s​ website for commencement dat​es, locations and mor​e.​

Get Ready for Commencement 2023
CSU-Hill-Day-2023.aspx
  
5/1/2023 9:06 AMRuble, Alisia5/1/20235/1/2023 8:00 AMAnnual Hill Day events brought students and university leaders together in the nation’s capital to advance federal legislative priorities.ImpactStory

​California State University students, alumni, staff, trustees and leadership met with federal legislators April 19 to advance top CSU federal priorities, including doubling the maximum Pell Grant and providing support and stability for undocumented students and employees, as part of the university's annual Hill Day events.

Among those who met with members of the CSU community were Speaker of the United States House of Representatives Kevin McCarthy, U.S. Senator Alex Padilla, Under Secretary​ of Education James Kvaal, U.S. Representatives Nanette Barragán and Jimmy Panetta and Speaker Emerita Nancy Pelosi.

During a Hill Day kick-off event, CSU Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester and Cal State Long Beach President Jane Conoley led a discussion with U.S. Congressman and CSULB alumnus Robert Garcia ('02, '10) in which they discussed issues pertaining to higher education policy and topics impacting the CSU.

Congressman Garcia also offered anecdotes about his priorities and experience in government as well as how his time at CSULB prepared him for his career as a public servant. He noted that the politics of campus leadership prepared him well for the politics of Congress.

“As an immigrant, pursuing my degree at CSULB allowed me to learn to lead," Congressman Garcia said. “The perspective I gained there informs me now as a legislator and advocate for our community. I am so proud to be a Cal State alum and look forward to all the great work they will keep doing. As always: Go Beach!"

In speaking with CSU delegates, Chancellor Koester emphasized the critical need to double the maximum federal Pell Grant to $12,990—and permanently index the grant to inflation—to enable students to pursue the security, promise and prosperity that come with a college degree.

Approximately 225,000 CSU students rely on Pell Grants to be able to attend college and more than 64,000 CSU Pell recipients earned bachelor's degrees in 2021-22—about 58 percent of the total graduating class.

“It is no overstatement: the Pell Grant is an American success story, but more must be done," Chancellor Koester said. “The Pell Grant continues to fall well short of meeting our students' needs, a circumstance exacerbated by inflation and soaring housing costs throughout California."

Established in 1972, the Pell Grant is the largest financial aid grant program offered by the U.S. Department of Education to help undergraduate students from low-income households pay for college and has benefitted more than 80 million students across the country.

Over time, though, the purchasing power of the Pell Grant has eroded from covering more than 75 percent of a student's total cost of attending a public four-year university to covering only about 28 percent of the cost.

“[Doubling the Pell Grant] will deliver a powerful return in the form of increased access to higher education and in improved student persistence, higher completion rates and enhanced basic needs support for students from modest financial means," Koester said. “It also helps our state and nation fulfill the workforce needs of the future with dynamically diverse and highly educated graduates, and it drives economic prosperity for all of us."

In meetings with legislators throughout the day, CSU delegates also championed a permanent fix for young undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as small children, known as Dreamers, many of whom are Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals​ (DACA) recipients. The DACA program has enabled hundreds of thousands of undocumented students to work and go to school in the U.S. and make significant contributions to the country.

As the nation's most ethnically diverse public four-year university, the CSU is deeply committed to ensuring academic opportunities are available to all the state's students, regardless of citizenship status. As of fall 2021, the CSU enrolled nearly 10,000 AB 540 and undocumented students, and counts approximately 500 DACA recipients among the CSU employee family.

Each of the university's 23 campuses provides resources for undocumented students and employees, and the provision of permanent legislative protection and support for Dreamers has been a federal CSU priority for several years.

Additionally, delegates urged legislators to provide more support for Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) like the CSU, of which 21 campuses are designated Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) and 14 campuses are designated Asian American Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions (AANAPISIs). These designations enable campuses to apply for federal and private grants that help strengthen their efforts to assist underserved communities.

The CSU's Hill Day events highlight the importance of having close relationships with legislators in the nation's capital who fully appreciate and believe in the power of higher education to transform lives, elevate families and communities, Koester said.

“It's only with the support of our federal leadership that we can fully realize our extraordinary promise and potential as a force for prosperity, equity, compassion and understanding, and as the nation's greatest engine of social mobility."

 

To learn more about the CSU's federal priorities, visit the Federal Relations website, and explore social media posts from Hill Day events on Wake​let.com.

six smiling individuals
CSU Community Advocates in D.C. for Doubling Pell and Protecting Dreamers
CSU-Establishes-Statewide-AANHPI-Student-Achievement-Program.aspx
  
4/26/2023 11:07 AMKelly, Hazel4/25/20234/25/2023 10:35 AMThe state-funded office will provide culturally responsive support for Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander students across the university system.DiversityPress Release

The California State University (CSU) has announced that the central office of its new Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander (AANHPI) Student Achievement Program will be housed at Sacramento State​.

Established by California legislation and added to the California Education Code in 2022, the CSU AANHPI Student Achievement Program seeks to enhance student educational experiences and promote higher education success for underserved and first-generation AANHPI students and other underrepresented students. The legislation also established a similar program at the California Community Colleges.

The new Sacramento-based systemwide office will receive $8 million annually from the state, much of which will be distributed to CSU campuses in the form of grants to create culturally appropriate academic and social programming and other services. The statewide central office will also support campuses through outreach, statewide and regional trainings and curriculum development.

“The launch of this exciting new program enables the CSU to expand critical support for our AANHPI students across California," said Dilcie Perez, associate vice chancellor for Student Affairs, Equity and Belonging at the CSU Chancellor's Office. “With its proven track record of support for Asian American and Pacific Islander students, Sacramento State is well-positioned to serve as the systemwide hub for these efforts to improve student success, close equity gaps and enhance student well-being for the CSU's diverse student population."

Sacramento State was selected as the program's systemwide central office following a CSU-led RFP process. The university enrolls one of the largest AANHPI student populations in the CSU and has been a federally designated Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institution (AANAPISI) for more than a decade.

In addition, a number of programs on the Sacramento campus are recognized for fostering student achievement, including the university's nationally recognized Full Circle Project that works to retain and graduate APIDA and low-income students through peer support, community engagement and a heightened sense of belonging. In February 2023, the university expanded these support efforts with the opening of its Asian Pacific Islander Desi American (APIDA) Center.

The CSU educates the most ethnically, economically and academically diverse student body in the nation, with more than 16 percent of its 460,000 students being Asian or Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander. Fourteen of the CSU's 23 campuses  are designated AANAPISI, allowing them to compete for federal and private grants that strengthen student success for underserved communities.



​About the California State University

The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, nearly 460,000 students, and 56,000 faculty and staff. Nearly 40 percent of the CSU's undergraduate students transfer from California Community Colleges. The CSU was created in 1960 with a mission of providing high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards nearly 130,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Dancer at Sac State’s Asian Pacific Islander festival
CSU Establishes Statewide AANHPI Student Achievement Program Based at Sacramento State
Internship-Power-Real-World-Experience-and-Career-Success.aspx
  
4/24/2023 9:02 AMRawls, Aaron4/24/20234/24/2023 9:20 AMCSU partnerships connect students with internships, streamlining the college-to-career pipeline.CareersStory
Internship Power hero 2

Internship Power: Real-World Experience and Career Success

CSU partnerships connect students with internships, streamlining the college-to-career pipeline.


 

The California State University is renowned for offering an affordable, high-quality education taught by world-class faculty members and accompanied by hands-on learning experiences. But the university understands that real-world work experience is integral for preparing job-ready graduates. To this end, the CSU not only encourages students to seek experiences outside the classroom, but builds partnerships with local employers to help students access relevant internships.

Learn about some of the ways CSU campuses are providing pathways to internship opportunities.

2022 U-GROW cohort with their families and certificates.

Growing the Research Workforce

Offered for the first time in 2022, the Undergraduates Gaining Research Opportunities for the Cancer Workforce (U-GROW) program provides students at eight CSU campuses in the greater Los Angeles area a chance to gain cancer research experience at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.

“The great majority of students in our undergrad programs do not know what they want to do," says Darrah Kuratani, Ph.D., U-GROW program director and CSU Dominguez Hills lecturer. “Having an internship gives them a chance to ideate. It gives them a chance to try something on, get involved with something and meet other people who have been doing this work so that they can figure out if this is the right path for them."

The 12-month program is open to CSU students from Channel Islands, Dominguez Hills, Fullerton, Long Beach, Los Angeles, Northridge, Pomona and San Bernardino up to a year post-graduation. It begins with a week-long bootcamp that introduces participants to the basics of cancer as well as provides networking opportunities with faculty and graduate students involved in cancer research.

Based on their area of interest, from cancer prevention and treatment to bioengineering, students are then paired with a mentor at Cedars-Sinai with whom they complete a summer internship. The U-GROW program will pay for up to 360 hours of work—increased from the 120 hours offered to the first cohort based on student feedback. Out of the nine students who completed the internship in summer 2022, three were asked to stay on their research projects and several others were brought onto other projects for the remainder of the program.

After the internship, students participate in monthly scientific communications workshops, during which they practice reading, speaking, presenting and writing about research. These workshops give students individualized preparation for graduate programs and careers in science. They also create a poster on their internship research, which they then present at Cedars-Sinai to emulate a conference session.

“Being a good writer and knowing the resources to use when you have to write something can help give a student not only confidence, but more of a scientist's identity," Dr. Kuratani says.

U-GROW accepted 10 students for the 2022 cohort and will increase the group by five students each year until it reaches 25 students per year. To apply, students must include a nomination from a supervisor or mentor, such as a faculty member.

“[Faculty] understand the student population and what their needs are," Kuratani says. “That untapped talent in the classroom just needs some nurturing and a little bit of confidence. … Sometimes what a student needs [to try something new] is someone else to see that potential in them."

See what three U-GROW alumni say about the experience.


Students with their poster presentation at the STEM CRU reverse career fair

Preparing Career-Ready Grads

Stanislaus State launched CareerReadyU (CRU) in 2019 to connect students with professional development and experiential learning opportunities to better prepare them for the workforce. A key source of its offerings comes through partnerships with about 30 local employers—such as the Turlock Irrigation District, AIG insurance company, Turlock Unified School District and E. & J. Gallo Winery—who participate in campus job fairs, offer internships, provide informational interviews and hire new graduates.

“Our students know that those employers who are partnering with us want to help them either get an internship or career, because they want to keep [that talent] in the Central Valley," CRU Executive Director Julie Sedlemeyer says. “We work with employers to help them figure out how to build their presence on campus, how to connect with students and how they can help us help our students become career-ready."

To help students land internships, CareerReadyU provides a range of services including support for crafting resumes, cover letters and LinkedIn profiles; professional headshot stations; interview-appropriate clothing through the Warrior Wardrobe; and career coaching. In addition, CRU keeps students informed of available internships and application deadlines and helps them connect with employers through on-campus career fairs. This spring, CRU will offer its first Last Chance Career Job Fair for employers filling last-minute summer internship positions.

When students apply to positions with industry partners, the employers can notify the staff at CRU who will then help prepare the students for the interviews, whether online or in person. It also offers space on campus where employers can interview student candidates more conveniently.

“I want students to have that 'aha' moment [when they get an internship or job], that they did it right," Sedlemeyer says. “For a lot for our students, it's getting rid of that imposter syndrome—because they got into Stan State, they belong here, and they have value to add to that employer in that internship."

To provide work experience earlier in students’ college careers, the team used an ASPIRE federal grant to create STEM CRU, which provides paid, on-campus research internships with faculty members for incoming first-year and transfer students who are selected for the program. Afterward, the students create a poster series, which they present during a “reverse career fair event​” attended by local employers. Then later in their college career, STEM CRU connects the students with paid internships with industry partners.

“It's a way for students to get comfortable telling their story and performing research," Sedlemeyer says. “They build their network, and they find out what they're going to like or not. It's ok if they come back and hated the internship, because they still learned something valuable that they don't get in a survival job."

Finally, CRU supports its partners by conducting employer consultations to better match services to their recruitment needs, promoting internships through the HireStanState career site and helping employers build out new, paid internship programs for those without them. Ultimately, this work aims to create greater internship and work opportunities for Stanislaus State students and graduates.

“We're working to provide more opportunities for our students through these internships because most internship programs are pathways," Sedlemeyer says. “Employers are using these as their pipeline and are hiring their career people from the internship opportunities."

Hear from Stan State alumna Melana Cook, Business Administration, Accounting '22, about her CRU experience.

Student meets with recruiters at CPP architecture Firm Day

Building an Architecture Career

For students studying architecture at the Cal Poly PomonaCollege of Environmental Design, a 500-hour internship is a required element of the five-year degree program.

Through the internship, “students get immersed in the culture of a firm," says George Proctor, department chair and professor in the Department of Architecture. “They may not be operating at the full tilt of somebody who's deeply immersed in a project, but students have an opportunity to see and do a lot. They might do drawings, visit projects, work on models or use [advanced] computer software. … When students come out of school, they're well-outfitted and are interested in taking their skills and putting them to work."

Not only does the internship count toward their graduation requirement, it allows students to work toward their architecture license. The National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB), the professional association administering architecture licenses, requires individuals to complete 3,740 hours of related work as part of the licensing process. CPP architecture faculty work with NCARB to keep students updated on licensing requirements and help students register with the organization to track the hours of their internships. Those 500 internship hours can then be applied to the hours required for the license.

“We're establishing a behavior in the students that leads them toward the next steps after school to be licensed and practicing," Proctor says.

Proctor also highlights the real-world experience students encounter in the internship setting that they don't get in the classroom, such as approaching city government for plan approval, corresponding with consultants or preparing presentations for a public setting.

“They get to see what that's like and to be, in a sense, like a fly on the wall," he says. “The big difference between practice and school is, in reality out in the world, most things are accomplished in a team setting. In an internship, students are in a context where they start to see that dynamic in a way that is not really possible in school."

To help students find an internship, the architecture program hosts an annual Firm Day held during the spring semester. While students can meet with recruiters at the event, their resumes and portfolios are also preloaded into a database ahead of time so employers can interview students the day of. Visits to project sites and local firms also expose students to potential workplaces.

In addition, the Department of Architecture partners with firms to help connect students with work opportunities—including Gensler, LPA Design Studios and Architects Orange, which all employ large numbers of CPP alumni. For example, Gensler's western regional director, LPA Design Studios' CEO and Architects Orange's first woman partner all graduated from CPP's architecture program. Given the alumni connection, their paid internship opportunities become a pipeline for students looking for employment post-graduation and a chance to network with those in the field.

“We help facilitate connections to the larger cultural community of the discipline that leads to opportunities that go way beyond what you can offer within the five-year degree," Proctor says. “Landing an internship or a job is a people thing. You have to be able to do the work, get things accomplished and do it well, but the relationships you build are what's going to make a path for you somewhere. The program and faculty make sure that's an integral part of what students get out of us."

Take a look at a past Cal Poly Pomona Architecture Firm Day.


Learn more about CSU industry partnerships and their critical role in preparing California's workforce.

​​
Internship Power: Real-World Experience and Career Success
CSU-Battles-Housing-Insecurity-with-New-Affordable-Housing-Grant-Program.aspx
  
4/19/2023 11:24 AMThropay, Janessa4/19/20234/19/2023 11:10 AM​The California State University is bolstering its efforts to support housing-insecure students with a new Affordable Housing Grant Program. Basic Needs InitiativeStory

The California State University (CSU) is bolstering its efforts to support housing-insecure students with a new Affordable Housing Grant Program. Through this plan, the CSU is slating a minimum of $5 million in grants for students who are experiencing financial challenges in securing housing or who would otherwise require substantial loans to pay for housing.

“We have a moral obligation to help our students and remove any barriers or obstacles that they are facing and get them connected to on-campus housing as much as possible," said Dilcie Perez, the associate vice chancellor for student affairs, equity & belonging at the CSU Chancellor's Office. “And if not on-campus, because that may not the ideal spot for every student, support them in living off campus so that we can remove that financial barrier for them as a challenge."

Perez is among the CSU team that is working closely with the Cal State Student Association to ensure access to high-quality and affordable housing for students through the new grant program. This collaborative effort was officially launched in late September 2022 and was made possible through a re-investment in basic needs by California Governor Gavin Newsom.


Basic Needs Allocation Funds Housing Grants

When the 2022-23 California Budget provided the CSU with $10 million in recurring funds to advance basic needs initiatives, the CSU encouraged its campuses to designate 50 percent of its allocation to go toward addressing housing needs for students.

CSU campuses worked swiftly and efficiently to develop tailored grant programs that would best serve students. Understanding the imperative that stude​nts need a safe, stable and affordable place to live while pursuing a college degree, these programs were implemented within weeks of the state's allocation disbursement.

“Knowing that students are facing insurmountable barriers and challenges and that housing affordability continues to be an issue not only on campus but throughout California, this effort was our bold movement to do something right now. We knew we couldn't wait," said Perez.

The monies will be put toward direct financial support for students seeking to live in on-campus housing facilities or off-campus housing. Funds will cover 50 to 100 percent of housing costs, depending on how each campus has created the program to meet the needs of its specific student demographic. Assistance can be provided by covering the housing costs through the creation of a new campus-based housing grant or by offsetting associated required fees (e.g., housing application fees, meal plans and security deposits) for undergraduate and graduate students.


CSU Campuses Immediately Breaking Down Barriers

CSU campuses are already taking action to make a difference in solving the housing insecurity issue. Many have broken down silos to establish cross-departmental partnerships to identify students who have the greatest need and would most benefit from this financial assistance.

For example, Chico State brought together its Financial Aid & Scholarship Office, University Foundation and Off-Campus Student Services to develop the inner workings of its grant program. The three entities are working seamlessly together to build an application and distribution process that will be easily accessible to students in need of housing support. Additionally, Chico State is going beyond the suggested 50 percent and has earmarked 100 percent of its basic needs allocation ($276,000) to go toward the campus' housing grant program.

“We are using 100 percent of our award to go toward student housing, and we are doing that through scholarships through our financial aid process," said Dr. Isaac Brundage, vice president for student affairs at Chico State. “We are looking at students who have a high need and funding and assisting those students to get housing."

These high-need students can be former foster students, unaccompanied homeless students or individuals with a low expected family contribution (EFC) of zero. Furthermore, the campus plans to launch a fundraising campaign later this year that will match its allocation. 

“Our foundation is part of the team involved in this program, and we are looking for donors to match our allocation so we can help even more students," said Brundage.

At San Diego State (SDSU), the Basic Needs Center led the charge in developing the campus' housing grant program and disseminating funds.

“We got the allocation last fall and were thrilled," said Chelsea Payne, SDSU's director of the basic needs center & economic crisis response team. “As soon as we got the memo, we started to gather the internal accounting structure that we would need to start to disseminate the grants out to students. What we already had in place was the team and staff that would be able to outreach to students and get them the grant funding."

SDSU received its basic needs allocation in September, started building the infrastructure of the program and outreached out to students in October and November, and distributed the first round of grants in December.

Payne notes how the Center prioritized making accessibility to the grants as low-barrier as possible. For instance, the Center worked with the Office of Housing Administration to identify any students who had a balance in their housing. They then reached out to these students and encouraged them to use the grant to pay off their dormitory balance.

“The time from application to award is one week," said Payne.

As of January 2023, SDSU has disseminated $87,000 in housing grants; the university estimates that the grant program will serve 500 - 600 students this school year.

CSU campuses also offer a variety of other supports and services for students who need housing assistance. This includes CSU's Rapid-Rehousing Program, where campuses establish ongoing partnerships with community organizations to support students in finding affordable housing, and the CSU Systemwide Housing Plan, which aims to add 4,600 new beds for 2022-2025 and 10,000 new beds for 2026 and beyond.

“What we want to create on our campuses are living-learning communities," said Perez in a recent interview with EdSource. “What we do not want to happen is that students have to make a choice between either living or learning. We want them to be able to do both."


CSU's Housing and Basic Needs Initiative Supports GI 2025

This program is the latest effort by the CSU to address the student housing crisis. It is also part of the CSU's basic needs efforts and its university-wide student success initiative, Graduation Initiative 2025. Housing falls under GI 2025's operational priority of “Student Engagement and Well-Being," and the CSU will continue to implement innovative strategies to battle housing insecurity as the university system works to increase graduation rates and ensure student success.


To learn more about the CSU Affordable Housing Grant Program, read EdSource's “CSU's housing grants aim to prevent rent crises among students" story. 

CSU student moving belongings into dorm
CSU Battles Housing Insecurity with New Affordable Housing Grant Program
chancellor-koester-aaua-tosney-award-2023.aspx
  
4/18/2023 12:51 PMKelly, Hazel4/18/20234/18/2023 12:45 PMAmerican Association of University Administrators bestows CSU chancellor with prestigious Tosney Award for Career Service.ChancellorStory

California State University Chancellor Jolene Koester has received the 2023 Tosney Award for Career Service in Higher Education Leadership from the American Association of University Administrators (AAUA) in recognition for her outstanding, long-term experience as an administrator.

Named for one of AAUA's pioneer members, Elieen Tosney, this award is considered to be AAUA's highest individual recognition.

Koester's long and distinguished career at the university has spanned decades—from her 17 years at Sacramento State University to her 11 years as president of California State University, Northridge, and more.

Throughout her career, Koester has developed a well-earned reputation as an ethical and purpose-driven leader, a champion of student success and inclusive excellence, and an unwavering supporter of innovation in teaching and learning.

Known nationally for her leadership in the area of higher education, Koester has served as a member and past chair of the Board of Directors for the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) and on a variety of other higher education organizations.

Koester began her role as CSU interim chancellor on May 1, 2022. Prior to this, she served as president of CSUN from 2000 to 2011 and as provost of Sacramento State from 1993 to 2000. Before her service as provost, she held other executive positions in the academic affairs division at Sacramento State, and was a faculty member there, beginning in 1980. After her retirement from CSUN in 2011, Koester served as senior consultant for AASCU Consulting, where she worked with university presidents and chancellors to enhance student success.

During her March 2023 report to the CSU Board of Trustees, Koester reflected on her role, and the role of women in leadership at the university today:

“As a 75-year-old woman who joined the California State University system at what was then California State University, Sacramento, I never thought I would come to see and participate in a day and a time in which there would be this overwhelming number of women serving in leadership. And similarly, the diversity of culture, race and ethnicity that is represented in leadership. Nor did I ever imagine that I would have the opportunity to serve, as a female, as the interim chancellor with a board chair who also represents gender and racial diversity. This is for me, a pretty momentous day."

Koester will continue her tenure until the CSU's next regularly appointed chancellor begins their role, expected in 2023.

Founded in 1970, the AAUA promotes leadership in college and university administration and recognizes excellence in practice.


Learn more about Chancellor Jolene Koester's priorities as she leads the CSU during this transformational time.

Chancellor Koester Honored by AAUA for Contributions to Higher Education
1 - 15Next
  
  
  
  
  
  
Page Heading
Page Image
Rollup Image
  
  
  
CSU-Trustees-Appoint-Presidents-of-Chico-State-Sacramento-State-and-Sonoma-State.aspx
  
5/24/20235/24/2023 8:35 AM​The California State University Board of Trustees has appointed , Stephen Perez to serve as president of Chico State, J. Luke Wood as president of Sacramento State and Ming-Tung "Mike" Lee to serve as president of Sonoma State.
From left to right: Stephen Perez, J. Luke Wood, and Ming-Tung "Mike" Lee, smiling in profile photos that are side by side.
Left to right: Stephen Perez, J. Luke Woods and Ming-Tung "Mike" Lee
CSU Trustees Appoint Presidents of Chico State, Sacramento State and Sonoma StateLeadershipPress Release
CSU-Statement-on-Governors-May-Revision-2023-24-Budget-Proposal.aspx
  
5/12/20235/12/2023 9:15 AMCalifornia Governor Gavin Newsom announced the May Revision of his administration's 2023-24 state budget proposal, including funding for the California State University.
Image of California's Capitol Building with copy "Budget News" across the front.
CSU Statement on Governor’s May Revision 2023-24 Budget ProposalBudgetPress Release
CSU-Establishes-Statewide-AANHPI-Student-Achievement-Program.aspx
  
4/25/20234/25/2023 10:35 AMThe state-funded office will provide culturally responsive support for Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander students across the university system. The state-funded office will provide culturally responsive support for Asian American, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander students across the university system.
Dancer at Sac State’s Asian Pacific Islander festival
CSU Establishes Statewide AANHPI Student Achievement Program Based at Sacramento StateDiversityPress Release
Susan-Borrego-Appointed-Interim-President-of-Stanislaus-State.aspx
  
4/12/20234/12/2023 3:55 PMCalifornia State University Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester has appointed Dr. Susan E. Borrego to serve as interim president of California State University, Stanislaus.
Susan Borrego smiling in yellow suit jacket
Susan E. Borrego Appointed Interim President of California State University, StanislausLeadershipPress Release
CSU-Announces-New-Leaders-for-Academic-and-Student-Affairs-Division.aspx
  
4/7/20234/7/2023 10:40 AMCalifornia State University Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester has appointed Dr. Nathan Evans and Dr. Dilcie Perez as deputy vice chancellors to lead the CSU's Division of Academic and Student Affairs.
Nathan Evans & Dilcie Perez smiling in portrait images side by side
California State University Announces New Leaders for Academic and Student Affairs DivisionLeadershipPress Release
Sylvia-Alva-Appointed-Interim-President-of-Cal-State-Fullerton.aspx
  
4/6/20234/6/2023 2:45 PM​California State University Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester has appointed Dr. Sylvia A. Alva to serve as interim president of California State University, Fullerton (CSUF).
Dr. Sylvia Alva smiling in portrait image
Sylvia A. Alva Appointed Interim President of California State University, FullertonLeadershipPress Release
Michael-Dumont-Appointed-Interim-President-of-Cal-Maritime.aspx
  
3/28/20233/28/2023 2:35 PMCalifornia State University Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester has appointed retired Navy Reserve Vice Admiral Michael J. Dumont to serve as interim president of California State University Maritime Academy.
Cal Maritime Interim President Michael Dumont smiling
Michael J. Dumont Appointed Interim President of California State University Maritime AcademyLeadershipPress Release
Leroy-Morishita-Appointed-Interim-President-of-CSULA.aspx
  
3/23/20233/23/2023 5:15 PMCalifornia State University Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester has appointed Leroy M. Morishita to serve as interim president of California State University, Los Angeles.
CSULA Interim President Leroy Morishita smiling
Leroy M. Morishita Appointed Interim President of California State University, Los AngelesLeadershipPress Release
CSU-Expands-Access-with-New-Transfer-Success-Pathway.aspx
  
3/21/20233/21/2023 4:00 PMComprehensive dual admission program will create a more efficient and accessible way for students to transfer to the CSU.Comprehensive dual admission program will create a more efficient and accessible way for students to transfer to the CSU.
Two female students walking on campus smiling
CSU Expands Access to a College Degree with New Transfer Success Pathway Transfer StudentPress Release
CSU-Summer-Arts-Program-Accepting-Student-Applications.aspx
  
2/21/20232/21/2023 3:40 PMImmersive on-campus arts experiences at Fresno State and abroad offer rare opportunity for students to live and work with some of the best artists in their disciplines.Immersive on-campus arts experiences at Fresno State and abroad offer rare opportunity for students to live and work with some of the best artists in their disciplines.
Cal State Summer Arts Performance
The Arts are Calling: CSU Summer Arts Program Accepting Student Applications CommunityPress Release
CSU-Super-Sunday-Message-Inspires-College-Going-Culture-Across-California.aspx
  
2/16/20232/16/2023 4:30 PMAnnual statewide church outreach empowers African American youth: ‘College is for you.’​The California State University has partnered with nearly 100 predominantly African American churches throughout California to present the 18th annual CSU Super Sunday on February 26, 2023.
Four girls at a CSU graduation ceremony smiling in their caps and gowns.
CSU Super Sunday Message Inspires College-Going Culture Across CaliforniaDiversityPress Release
CSU-Continues-to-Provide-the-Most-Affordable-Higher-Education-in-the-Nation.aspx
  
1/25/20231/25/2023 3:40 PMWith the country’s lowest tuition and fees, CSU institutions provide a proven path toward upward mobility.With the country’s lowest tuition and fees, CSU institutions provide a proven path toward upward mobility.
Student shakes hands with faculty member at graduation
CSU Continues to Provide the Most Affordable Higher Education in the NationAffordabilityPress Release
wang-family-excellence-awards-2023.aspx
  
1/24/20231/24/2023 1:00 PMWang Family Excellence Awards honor exceptional contributions in teaching, scholarship and service to CSU students.Wang Family Excellence Awards honor exceptional contributions in teaching, scholarship and service to CSU students.
headshots of five people winning an award
CSU Faculty and Staff Honored for Dedication to Student SuccessFacultyPress Release
Statement-on-Pending-Retirement-of-Cal-State-Fullerton-President-Virjee.aspx
  
1/23/20231/23/2023 7:40 AMWhile president of California State University, Fullerton and throughout his service as general counsel for the CSU, Fram Virjee has been the epitome of a servant leader, displaying an infectious passion to improve opportunities for students.​​​
Cal State Fullerton President Virjee speaking at graduation ceremony
Statement on Pending Retirement of California State University, Fullerton President Framroze VirjeeLeadershipPress Release
Chico-State-Presidential-Search-Committee-to-Hold-Open-Forum.aspx
  
1/20/20231/20/2023 9:20 AMThe California State University Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of California State University, Chico to succeed Gayle E.  Hutchinson, Ph.D., who will retire as campus president at the end of the 2022-23 academic year.
California State University, Chico campus building
California State University, Chico Presidential Search Committee to Hold Open ForumLeadershipPress Release
1 - 15Next
  
  
  
  
  
  
  
Page Image
Rollup Image
  
CSUs-Inspiring-Grads-of-2023.aspx
  
5/30/20235/30/2023 8:55 PMOvercoming obstacles and making a positive impact are the stories of these six graduates in the Class of 2023.CommencementStory
Joseph Valadez posing with sunglasses on in his CSULB graduation cap and gown.
CSU’s Inspiring Grads of 2023
Statement-on-Cozen-Systemwide-Title-IX-and-DHR-Assessment.aspx
  
5/24/20235/24/2023 10:05 AM​The following statement can be attributed to CSU Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester:​ "I state this in the strongest and most unequivocal terms: The CSU is committed to this work."LeadershipStory
Chancellor's Office with the copy "Chancellor Statement" across the middle.
Statement on Cozen O'Connor Board of Trustees Presentation on Systemwide Title IX and DHR Assessment
CSU-Trustee-Spotlight-Wenda-Fong.aspx
  
5/22/20235/22/2023 8:00 AMThe university’s first Asian American woman to serve as chair of the CSU Board of Trustees shares stories and lessons from her leadership journey.LeadershipStory
a group of smiling college students with an administrator
CSU Trustee Spotlight: Wenda Fong
5-CSU-Commencement-Addresses-Worth-Rewatching.aspx
  
5/15/20235/15/2023 8:40 AMRevisit these historic speeches that proved to be crowd pleasers.CommencementStory
5 CSU Commencement Addresses Worth Rewatching
APIDA-Heritage-Month-2023.aspx
  
5/8/20235/8/2023 8:00 AMThe CSU recognizes Asian Pacific Islander Desi American (APIDA) Heritage Month.DiversityStory
four smiling college students
Cultural Connections
CalState-CREATE-student-competition-2023.aspx
  
5/4/20235/4/2023 8:50 AM'You Belong Here' was the theme of the virtual creative event for CSU students across the system.Student SuccessStory
three students sitting with laptops
Inaugural Cal State CREATE Student Competition Celebrates a Sense of Belonging
CSU-Recognized-for-Promoting-Mental-Health-Literacy.aspx
  
5/2/20235/2/2023 3:45 PMMental Health First Aid training has equipped more than 600 faculty members to become allies for students. WellnessStory
CSU Channel Island student volunteer smiling at Involvement Fair
CSU Recognized for Promoting Mental Health Literacy
Get-Ready-for-Commencement-2023.aspx
  
5/1/20235/1/2023 3:55 PMSee how CSU commencement ceremonies will celebrate this year’s graduates.CommencementStory
Get Ready for Commencement 2023
CSU-Hill-Day-2023.aspx
  
5/1/20235/1/2023 8:00 AMAnnual Hill Day events brought students and university leaders together in the nation’s capital to advance federal legislative priorities.ImpactStory
six smiling individuals
CSU Community Advocates in D.C. for Doubling Pell and Protecting Dreamers
Internship-Power-Real-World-Experience-and-Career-Success.aspx
  
4/24/20234/24/2023 9:20 AMCSU partnerships connect students with internships, streamlining the college-to-career pipeline.CareersStory
Internship Power: Real-World Experience and Career Success
CSU-Battles-Housing-Insecurity-with-New-Affordable-Housing-Grant-Program.aspx
  
4/19/20234/19/2023 11:10 AM​The California State University is bolstering its efforts to support housing-insecure students with a new Affordable Housing Grant Program. Basic Needs InitiativeStory
CSU student moving belongings into dorm
CSU Battles Housing Insecurity with New Affordable Housing Grant Program
chancellor-koester-aaua-tosney-award-2023.aspx
  
4/18/20234/18/2023 12:45 PMAmerican Association of University Administrators bestows CSU chancellor with prestigious Tosney Award for Career Service.ChancellorStory
Chancellor Koester Honored by AAUA for Contributions to Higher Education
CSUs-Path-to-Carbon-Neutrality.aspx
  
4/17/20234/17/2023 1:30 PMDetermined to combat climate change and promote sustainability, the CSU progresses toward the goal of being carbon neutral by 2045.SustainabilityStory
Students at Cal Poly SLO studying their solar energy panels surrounded by sheep
The CSU’s Path to Carbon Neutrality
Caring-for-Californians.aspx
  
4/17/20234/17/2023 8:00 AMSee how the CSU plans to use state grant money to expand social work degree program capacity and diversify the behavioral health workforce.Social ScienceStory
a woman sitting behind a table
Caring for Californians
STEM-NET-Elevating-Research-and-Collaboration-Across-the-CSU.aspx
  
4/12/20234/12/2023 10:25 AMFaculty and students expand their STEM knowledge and experience through systemwide affinity group focused on research and providing sustainable funding.STEMStory
Professor assisting student in science lab
STEM-NET: Elevating Research and Collaboration Across the CSU
1 - 15Next