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Study-Abroad-Scholarships.aspx
  
9/23/2022 9:56 AMRuble, Alisia9/26/20229/26/2022 9:00 AMCSU International Programs awards scholarships that empower student to study abroad.InternationalStory

California State University study abroad programs offer students a rich global education, helping them develop strong intercultural communication and language skills and benefiting their future careers. To provide greater access to these opportunities, the CSU has awarded scholarships to more than a dozen students from across the university for the 2022-23 school year as part of its biannual CSU International Programs (CSU IP) scholarship program.

The CSU offers one of the most affordable study abroad programs in the nation. Students enrolled in CSU IP programs pay the same systemwide tuition fee, which is $5,742 per academic year for full-time undergraduate students, and minimal campus and program fees. 

While CSU financial aid, scholarships, fee waivers and loans apply to study abroad programs, CSU IP provides additional scholarships to help students pay for travel expenses, housing, dining and extracurricular activities. This is especially important for first-generation, Pell-eligible students who are less likely to be able to afford the extra costs.

“I wouldn't have been able to study abroad if it weren't for receivingLorem ipsum dolor sit ametCSUN student Kobby Tran
​ scholarships or the support I got from my study abroad advisor," says Kobby Tran, a third-year California State University, Northridge student majoring in Asian American studies and Japanese.

Tran, who transferred to CSUN this semester from CSU Channel Islands, was awarded a Lyman G. Chaffee Scholarship and will spend the 2022-23 school year studying at Waseda University in Shinjuku, Tokyo. He says being awarded the scholarship means he will have the opportunity to explore the country he has admired for so long, meet new people and strengthen his Japanese language skills.

Fourth-year Chico State University student Humberto Partida says he chose to study abroad with CSU IP because of its affordability. Receiving a CSU IP Scholarship helped him pay for his travel expenses and lodging while he studies at the CSU Florence Center in Italy, one of several CSU IP Study Centers where courses are taught in English by local faculty.

“This experience is so meaningful to me because I am doing something that neither my parents nor anyone in my family has done," Partida says. “As a Catholic, I am also grateful to be able to learn about the rich history and traditions of my faith and explore the many beautiful churches."

In his short time abroad, Partida—a political science and international relations major with a European and international studies minor—has already completed an intensive Italian language course, visited several other cities in Italy and made friends with other international students and locals alike.

CSU IP makes available six types of scholarships, most of which require applicants to demonstrate a high financial need and some that are made possible through the generosity of former CSU IP participants:

  • CSU IP Ghana Scholarship
  • CSU IP Language and Culture Scholarship
  • CSU IP Scholarship
  • Lyman G. Chaffee Scholarship
  • Michelle Marriot Study in France Memorial Scholarship
  • Ward Wallach Memorial International Scholarship

“Awarding these scholarships enables more first-generation, Pell-eligible students from underserved backgrounds to experience the significant impact studying abroad can have on their lives and their future careers," says CSU IP Director Jaishankar Raman, Ph.D.

CSU IP has been providing study abroad opportunities since 1963, serving more than 500 students each year. Participants earn resident academic credit at their respective university while they pursue full-time, yearlong study at a host university or special study center abroad. To date, nearly 25,000 students have studied abroad through the CSU IP.

The program serves the needs of students in more than 100 designated academic majors and has affiliations with more than 60 recognized universities and institutions of higher education in 18 countries, offering a wide selection of study locales and learning environments.


The CSU IP scholarship application for the spring 2023 term are now open. Visit the CSU IP website​ to learn more about study abroad opportunities and scholarships.

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Study Abroad
A-Conversation-with-the-CSUs-Latinx-Presidents-September-2022.aspx
  
9/20/2022 2:00 PMRuble, Alisia9/20/20229/20/2022 9:00 AMIn celebration of National Hispanic Heritage Month, some of the CSU's Latinx university leaders reflect on their journey and inspiration.LeadershipStory

LIFTING UP CALIFORNIA COMMUNITIES

In celebration of National Hispanic Heritage Month, some of the CSU's Latinx university ​leaders reflect on their journey and inspiration.

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The California State University is comprised of some of the most academically, economically and ethnically diverse students, faculty and staff in the nation. Its 23 university presidents not only reflect the unique identities of community members, but they also work to promote equity and inclusion and empower students, faculty and staff.

While Latinx individuals account for about 14 percent of four-year college and university presidents in the United States, Latinx leaders make up about 17 percent of the CSU’s university presidents. To mark the occasion of National Hispanic Heritage Month, we asked some of the CSU’s Latinx university presidents to share their journey and what inspires their work.

Read thoughts from San Diego State President Adela de la Torre, Fresno State President Saúl Jiménez-Sandoval and Cal State San Bernardino President Tomás D. Morales.


Adela de la Torre
San Diego State President​

As one of a small number of Latinx university presidents in the U.S., what motivated you to keep pursuing new and higher roles when you didn’t see people like yourself in leadership positions? 

I had so much support and encouragement from my grandmother, an immigrant from Mexico, and my mother, a public school teacher of 40 years. They were also big supporters of education. When I was a student, discrimination and bias were very present, so being motivated meant having not only desire, but also resilience and grit. In graduate school, I was part of a small group of Latina Ph.D. students who shared those qualities, and we supported each other. We called ourselves "Mujeres en Marcha," which translates to "Women on the Move," and we ended up graduating and becoming highly successful, most of us as faculty in higher education. 

As my career matured and I earned leadership roles in universities, my motivation shifted from focusing on teaching and research on Latinx social inequalities to creating systemic change to address these inequalities. As president of SDSU, I have a unique opportunity to put into practice strategic initiatives and policies to further support access, equity and student success for current and future generations of students, faculty and staff. If that doesn't motivate you, I'm not sure what could. 

How do your unique Latinx heritage and your lived experiences shape your leadership style?

In my experience and in my own family, I have found the Latinx community to be passionate, tenacious and family-focused. That heritage has served me well. My familia supported me every step of my way to this position, and now, as president of this great university, I'm focused on growing the family atmosphere among our nearly 7,000 faculty and staff, 36,000 students and 470,000 alumni. The more we come together and support one another, the more SDSU will positively impact the world.

As a Latina undergraduate and graduate student, I was always passionate about understanding social inequality and how to create a society that would bring everybody to the table to bridge these differences. I studied economics because it allowed me to understand the key factors that created barriers or opportunities for these types of conversations. Indeed, early on as an undergraduate I realized that Latinx economists were virtually nonexistent in these important discussions. 

This lack of presence in the profession and dire need for the Latinx perspective on these issues propelled my desire to become the first Mexican American woman to earn a Ph.D. in agricultural and resource economics at University of California, Berkeley. ​As a leader, that kind of passion, self-awareness and focus for what you want to do is critical in order to be successful in these leadership roles. Not only do you achieve more, but it also drowns out the hostile and negative elements around you. I strive to impart that kind of passion and family spirit at SDSU. 

How do you use your leadership platform as one of the few Latinx university presidents to inspire and empower students, faculty and staff to dream big and pursue their goals? What inspires you to do this important work day in and day out? 

I want our students, faculty and staff at SDSUno matter their race, ethnicity, gender or any other identity​to see me as a Latina in this role and realize that they, too, can be pioneers in their chosen fields. Leaders who break "traditional" molds are good reminders that there are pathways for others and that anything is possible. Inspiring someone to say, "I can do that," is a great first step in getting them to dream big. From there, I always try to bring people in and listen, to value their perspectives and to see how our goals and visions can align. 

Giving them a voice and earning their support is empowering for them and makes me a more effective leader. And, ultimately, as SDSU president, I can support those big dreams by working to ensure there is a clarity of purpose that supports the expansion of access and opportunities for all students at SDSU and beyond. SDSU is now 125 years old and has come so far, but our work is not done and the opportunities for us are endless. That's what inspires me each and every day. 


Saúl Jiménez-Sandoval
Fresno State President

As one of a small number of Latinx university presidents in the U.S., what motivated you to keep pursuing new and higher roles when you didn’t see people like yourself in leadership positions? 

My journey to becoming president of Fresno State has been filled with insightful mentors who have shared their wisdom with me and have invested in developing my leadership skills. Having arrived in the San Joaquín Valley at the age of 10, I have seen it grow and change into a vibrant, productive area that plays an essential role in the economic vitality of California. As an immigrant who has long called the Valley home, my journey of self-discovery intertwines with an awareness of the region's history. My father Alfonso Jiménez, an honest and hardworking man, first arrived here in the early 1950s and dedicated his life to working the fields. My mother, Tila Sandoval, and my siblings and I later arrived to forge our own productive lives and contribute to the region's development and cultural richness.

Over the past years, I've realized that waves upon waves of people have settled in this fertile valley—each with the dream of working to better their families. Each left their imprint. They brought the best of themselves and built a great legacy that contributed to the Valley becoming the most productive agricultural region in the world. My inspiration to lead Fresno State comes from my awareness that my own personal history builds upon this proud legacy. I am wholly dedicated to elevating the quality of life for friends, neighbors and family who make this valley their home. For me, the presidency of Fresno State has never been a job; it's a life mission with the goal of empowering our students to succeed—that's the key to strengthening our communities.

How do your unique Latinx heritage and your lived experiences shape your leadership style?

Growing up in the San Joaquín Valley gave me the unique opportunity to live in a rich cultural milieu and to celebrate my own history while enjoying the diversity of a region that speaks over 120 languages. As a scholar of history, I am keenly aware of the many peoples​past and presentwho make up the social fabric of the Valley. I live amidst their combined contributions; I have thrived in an environment that is culturally rich, extremely productive and ripe with possibilities.  Our diversity is the source of our strength. I, therefore, make it a point to construct bridges of understanding between communities, with Fresno State as their vehicle for opportunities for social mobility.

Teachers and mentors from many backgrounds gave selflessly of themselves to nourish my developmentto help me achieve my dreams. I now share my efforts, challenges, and successes with my wife, Mariana, and my sons, Arion and Leo, each of whom values and participates in the diverse experiences available in our campus and extended communities. Thus, my lived experiences fuel my focus on inclusion, as well as my celebration of the multiplicity of languages, cultures and histories that now converge in our vibrant Valley. I am so proud of my heritage and history, and so glad to contribute my talents to the bright future I see for our region.

How do you use your leadership platform as one of the few Latinx university presidents to inspire and empower students, faculty and staff to dream big and pursue their goals? What inspires you to do this important work day in and day out? 

I am grateful beyond words that I have the chance to contribute to our collective understanding of who can become a university president. My story is the story of the community. So many of our students have faced extremely difficult challenges, yet they still see opportunity in this Valley. It is their home and its future is a worthwhile investment. They work hard and contribute greatly to our region. My inspiration comes from my own students and their resilience in forging their own paths, as well as from the pressing needs I see in the community. I'm inspired by the sacrifice of so many families who work hard to send their daughters and sons to Fresno State so they can have better lives. They will lead our Valley to new levels of prosperity. Their vision and drive will produce higher levels of regional excellence.

I'm also inspired by the collective spirit of our Valley. Every demographic of our community begins with humble origins, yet overcomes great odds and challenges. They break new ground through hard work, passionate commitment to their dreams and a vision that promotes the greater good. My community—our daughters and sons, with their ingenuity and energy—are my inspiration. My ultimate goal is to showcase Fresno State as supporting a journey within a place of belonging—a journey that strengthens both our sense of shared stewardship and our drive to create a stronger Valley for all.​


Tomás D. Morales
Cal ​State San Bernardino President

As one of a small number of Latinx university presidents in the U.S., what motivated you to keep pursuing new and higher roles when you didn’t see people like yourself in leadership positions?

I am incredibly proud of my family and my Latinx heritage. My Puerto Rican culture was a profound shaper of my life. Both of my parents were hard working and supportive, but I knew from a young age that, if I wanted to achieve something, I needed to go out and work for it. A key inspiration for me was my late mother: she raised her children and then returned to school to earn her own degree.

I am a proud product of public education, from elementary all the way through doctoral. I have also spent my career at public universities. I am extremely grateful for the opportunities provided by public education, and aware from my lived experience of the obstacles that students with economically challenged, first-generation backgrounds similar to mine face. So, for me, it was more than forging a path for myself. The mentors who nurtured and supported me taught me that what I gained, I needed to give back. That is what has propelled me forward. And that has become the core, the heart of my career: building student success.

How do your unique Latinx heritage and your lived experiences shape your leadership style?

I know the expertise that leads people to become chairs, deans or vice presidents is born of years of study and experience. So, in building and then working with a leadership team, I let them know I both respect their expertise as I expect them to respect mine. While I must make the final decision, I want them to know their voices matter. That comes from my family. We were always stronger together if we worked as a team. How to disagree with one another, maintain respect for each other and find a way to move forward: those were key life skills.

It is an approach I take to everything that I do, be it launching a strategic planning process, revising the campus’s master plan or seeing that CSUSB’s role as an anchor institution in the community to ensure our students’ success has meant building strong partnerships with our K-12 schools, regional community colleges and universities, local government entities and private business. It’s never about just one person. We all need to come together to create the strong future for our university and our region, which remains our collective goal.

How do you use your leadership platform as one of the few Latinx university presidents to inspire and empower students, faculty and staff to dream big and pursue their goals? What inspires you to do this important work day in and day out?

There are two ways that I use my leadership platform: through my words and through my actions. Speaking to our students, staff, faculty, community groups and local government and/or private organizations, I can share my story and the story of our diverse CSUSB students and their successes. It is their successes which inspire me and, I know, inspire others. I tell our students all the time: when you earn your degree, you are not simply building your own life, you are serving as a mentor and inspiration to your immediate and extended family members as well as the members of your surrounding community.

Through my actions means using my platform to create and/or support initiatives which provide opportunities for students, faculty, staff and administrators to grow their careers and build their lives. That ranges from supporting opportunities for our Latinx students, to attending HACU conferences to network, to supporting an initiative created by CSUSB’s female faculty and staff to hold an annual conference focused on issues impacting women. The short answer, though, to what inspires me to do this important work day in and day out? That’s simple: our students. What amazing individuals they are, with so much heart and so much hope.


The CSU partners with Latinx communities to increase the college preparation, enrollment and graduation rates of students across the state of California. Learn more about these efforts.​

Lifting Up California Communities
CSUs-Occupy-Top-Spots-in-Latest-U.S.-News-and-World-Report-Rankings.aspx
  
9/13/2022 11:34 AMThropay, Janessa9/13/20229/13/2022 11:25 AMMany California State University campuses once again occupied lofty spots in the latest round of rankings issued by U.S. News & World Report on September 12.Social MobilityStory

​Many California State University campuses once again occupied lofty spots in the latest round of rankings issued by U.S. News & World Report on September 12.

Among the more than 400 universities cited for advancing social mobility by enrolling and graduating large portions of students awarded with Pell Grants, the CSU placed four universities in the top 15 led by Cal State Long Beach, ranked third. CSULB was joined by Cal State Fullerton (7), Cal State San Bernardino (13) and San Francisco State (15) among the top 15 and Fresno State (30) among the top 30.

Additionally, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo has been named the best public, master's-level university in the West for the 30th consecutive year. Cal Poly San Luis Obispo also ranked second among a list that included 13 CSUs among the top 40 universities:

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo (2)
Cal Poly Pomona (14)
San José State (16)
CSU Monterey Bay (22)
Cal State LA (24)
Stanislaus State (25)
Chico State (tied for 26)
CSU Channel Islands (tied for 28)
Cal Poly Humboldt (tied for 32)
CSUN (tied for 32)
Sonoma State (35)
Sacramento State (tied for 38)
CSU San Marcos (tied for 39)

Several CSUs also ranked among the top colleges in the West for serving veterans:

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo (1)
San José State (7)
Cal State LA (tied for 10)
Stanislaus State (12)
Chico State (13)
Cal Poly Humboldt (tied for 14)
Sacramento State (16)
CSU Dominguez Hills (21)

Cal Maritime, the only degree-granting maritime academy on the West Coast, ranked third on the list of regional colleges in the West.

Each year, the 23 CSU campuses receive accolades for providing quality education, ensuring access and affordability, and serving as an engine of social mobility.​

Three students walking to class in the Fall.
CSUs Occupy Top Spots in Latest U.S. News & World Report Rankings
CSU-Trustees-Award-23-Top-Student-Scholars-for-Outstanding-Achievement.aspx
  
9/15/2022 8:50 AMKelly, Hazel9/12/20229/12/2022 10:00 AMThe California State University (CSU) has selected 23 students, one from each university, to receive the 2022 Trustees' Award for Outstanding Achievement. Student SuccessPress Release

​The California State University (CSU) has selected 23 students, one from each university, to receive the 2022 Trustees' Award for Outstanding Achievement. The students will be honored for their talent, diligence and zeal during a ceremony as part of the CSU Board of Trustees meeting on Tuesday, September 13.

The CSU Trustees' Award is the university's highest recognition of student achievement. Each award provides a donor-funded scholarship to students who​ demonstrate superior academic performance, personal accomplishments, community service and inspirational goals for the future. The awardees have demonstrated a deep commitment to making a positive impact on their generation, as well as those who come after them.

“These 23 remarkable scholars wonderfully exemplify the ideals of the California State University," said CSU Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester. “Their inspirational stories are connected by a common thread of intelligence, perseverance, resilience and the transformative power of higher education. Our communities, state and nation—indeed, our world—will long reap the benefits of their academic, professional and personal achievement."

More than 420 students have been honored with the Trustees' Award since the scholarship program was established in 1984 by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation. In 1999, the Hearst Foundation partnered with the CSU Board of Trustees to supplement the endowment with contributions from CSU Trustees, CSU Foundation board members and private donors. The 23 scholarships awarded this year will total more than $180,000 in scholarship funds. Each student scholarship bears the name of a donor.

Ali C. Razi, a CSU Trustee Emeritus who serves on the CSU Foundation Board of Governors, endowed a scholarship fund to recognize the top CSU Trustees' Award recipient annually. Cal State Long Beach student Nevi Keser Gruskin​ was named this year's Trustee Emeritus Ali C. Razi Scholar and will receive a $17,000 scholarship.

The awardees will be recognized for their superior achievements during the Committee on Institutional Advancement portion of the September 13 CSU Board of Trustees meeting, with a special reception to follow.

Visit the CSU Trustees' Award for Outstanding Achievement website for bios on all 23 scholars as well as donor information.​

The 2022 CSU Trustees' Scholars are:

  • Lesley Bode, Cal Poly Humboldt

    Trustee Emerita Debra Farar Scholar

  • Kenya Janae Burton, Sacramento State

    Chancellor Emeritus Charles B. and Catherine Reed Scholar

  • Serina Cabrera, Sonoma State

    Trustee Emeritus Murray L. Galinson Scholar

  • Chamese Dempsey, San Diego State

    Stauffer Foundation Scholar

  • Ome Garcia, San José State

    Trustee Emeritus William Hauck and Padget Kaiser Scholar

  • Nevi Keser Gruskin, Cal State Long Beach

    Trustee Emeritus Ali C. Razi Scholar

  • Isaiah Armond Jamal Henderson, Chico State

    Chancellor Emeritus Timothy P. White Scholar

  • Dylan Gunner Jones, CSU Bakersfield

    William Randolph Hearst Scholar

  • Breana Lewis, Cal State East Bay

    Trustee Emeritus Peter Taylor Scholar

  • Miquelle McCarthy, Cal State LA

    Michael A. and Debe Lucki Scholar

  • Dawoud Mishal, CSUN

    William Randolph Hearst Scholar

  • Chiefe Mo, Cal Poly Pomona

    Trustee Wenda Fong and Daniel Fetterly Scholar

  • Jeffrey Mueller, Cal Maritime

    Trustee Jack McGrory Scholar

  • Daisy Morado Navarrete, CSU Channel Islands

    TELACU Scholar

  • Samantha Patricia Navarro, Fresno State

    Trustee Emeritus Peter Mehas Scholar

  • Nghia Trong Phan, Cal State Fullerton

    Southern California Edison Scholar

  • Jeisson Pulido, CSU Dominguez Hills

    Ron and Mitzi Barhorst Scholar

  • Lisamarie Raimondo, Stanislaus State

    William Randolph Hearst Scholar

  • Johnathan Rodney, CSU San Marcos

    Trustee Emeritus Kenneth Fong Scholar

  • manmit Singh, San Francisco State

    William Randolph Hearst Scholar

  • Misealle Louise Tolliver, Cal State San Bernardino

    Steinhauser Family Scholar

  • Nathalie R. Zamora Vigil, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo

    William Randolph Hearst Scholar

  • Spencer Hart Winter, CSU Monterey Bay

    Trustee Emerita Claudia H. Hampton Scholar


About the California State University

The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 477,000 students and 56,000 faculty and staff. Nearly 40 percent of the CSU's undergraduate students transfer from California Community Colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 132,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.


2022 CSU Trustee Scholars Awardees
CSU Trustees' Award for outstanding achievement 2022
CSU Trustees Award 23 Top Student Scholars for Outstanding Achievement
Where-Are-They-Now-2.aspx
  
9/12/2022 3:31 PMRuble, Alisia9/12/20229/12/2022 9:00 AMJoin us as we track down CSU alumni who went from promising to prosperous.AlumniStory
Where are they now hero 2

Where are they now?

Join us as we track down CSU alumni who went from promising to prosperous.


 

With more than four million California State University alumni scattered around the globe, it's not easy to keep up with all the amazing things they are doing! So, we launched a series​ in which we check in with a couple periodically to hear about their journey from campus to career. In this installment, meet two alumni who leveraged their CSU education to pay it forward for current college students.

ANAIIS CISCO

San Francisco State University ’19

THEN:

M.F.A., Cinema | The CSU Trustees' Award for Outstanding Achievement: Trustee Emerita Rebecca D. and James Eisen Scholar, 2017
“Receiving the Trustees' Award and scholarship not only helped me to continue developing my voice as a writer and director, but it enabled me to produce a short story, GYRL​, that highlighted Black girlhood, an experience rarely depicted in mainstream media. Completion of this short film project led to a departmental nomination for an extremely competitive film grant, the Princess Grace Award, which I was awarded in 2018."

Proudest Moment:
“Receiving the prestigious recognition of the university's Graduate Student Award for Distinguished Achievement changed my life. It was beyond rewarding to complete my graduate studies while being recognized for my creative and academic endeavors. I thought accepting a professorship at Smith College was a huge accomplishment, but this acknowledgement was a complete surprise!"  

NOW:

Filmmaker | Assistant Professor of Moving Image Production, Smith College
“I am the first filmmaker/professor to hold my position in Smith College's program of Film and Media Studies. In my roles, I want to create pathways for students to gain hands-on experience working with skilled production teams on film sets. Women and non-binary people do not occupy a huge percentage of behind-the-scenes positions in the film and television industry, and I want to be a part of this move toward shattering this disparity." 

Looking Back:
“Education has taught me how to navigate the world. The media professionals in San Francisco State's School of Cinema introduced me to various styles and conventions of media production and helped me develop my craft as a filmmaker and as a professor. I found ways to intersect art and scholarship while supporting and learning from the next generations of student creators."  

Maggie White

California State University, Stanislaus ’16/’18

THEN:

B.A., Communication Studies, M.P.A., Public Administration | Student Trustee, CSU Board of Trustees, 2015-17
“While serving as a student trustee, I was part of two presidential hiring committees, and the board hired five presidents in that one year. They were all women, and it was incredibly impactful to me at that point in my life to see them succeeding at such high levels."

Lessons Learned:
“My time as a trustee, and all the people I met and unexpected situations I found myself in, gave me real-life applications of what I was learning as I pursued first my undergraduate degree ​in communications and then my graduate degree in public administration. There was nothing in my textbooks that couldn't be tied back to the problems we faced at the board meetings and the work that was being done across the system. It made my education even more real and meaningful to me."

NOW:

Legislative Advocate | California State University, Office of the Chancellor
“I am responsible for tracking, analyzing and providing feedback on thousands of legislative bills largely related to students' experience at the university. One exciting moment was when my first Board of Trustees-sponsored bill, Assembly Bill 829, was signed into law, which gave the CSU the authority to offer an Occupational Therapy Doctorate."

Looking Back:
“I realized when I was a junior at Stanislaus State just getting involved in advocacy for my campus that the mission of the CSU aligned so perfectly with my own personal values. I also realized I had a lot to say about the power of a CSU education and what it means in the Central Valley to earn a college degree. I've been so lucky to be involved in systemwide advocacy since then (eight years!) and I still feel I have work to do to advance our mission of access, affordability, quality, completion and equity."


Meet more CSU alumni making a difference in the liv​es of the people of California and the world.


Where Are They Now?
California-State-University-to-Host-“College-Night”-College-Fairs.aspx
  
9/15/2022 8:49 AMKelly, Hazel9/8/20229/8/2022 11:05 AMThroughout September, the California State University (CSU) will be hosting “College Night” college fairs across the state providing all aspiring students the opportunity to meet with all 23 CSU campuses in one location.Student SuccessPress Release

Throughout September, the California State University (CSU) will be hosting “College Night" college fairs across the state, providing any high school or community college students, returning students or adult learners, as well as parents and family members, the opportunity to meet with all 23 CSU campuses in one location.

“With the CSU looking to grow enrollment, the upcoming College Nights are a great way for prospective students to get more information about the opportunities available at the 23 universities in one place," said Ginger Reyes, systemwide director of Admissions and Outreach. “The pandemic limited events like this in recent years, so we are excited to engage with prospective students and their family and friends to help them determine which CSU campus is the best fit for them."

Beginning on October 1, the CSU will begin accepting applications for admission to the fall 2023 term at all 23 universities. Prospective students interested in attending any CSU campus can apply online at the university's application portal: Cal State Apply. Cal State Apply enables all potential CSU incoming freshman, transfer, graduate and international students to apply to multiple CSU campuses with just one application.

Attendees at any College Night session will be given key tips to help navigate the application process, important dates and deadlines, information about financial aid and more. CSU representatives will be ready to share insight on various topics, including:

  • Learning how to prepare for CSU first-year and transfer admissions

  • Tips on completing your CSU application

  • Finding resources to help pay for college

  • Discovering why the CSU is the best value in higher education​

Please visit the CSU College Night website for more information.

 

CSU College Night Dates:

Monday, September 19th | Clovis Veterans Memorial District | Clovis, CA [CENTRAL VALLEY]

Wednesday, September 21st | San Jose DoubleTree Hotel | San Jose, CA

Thursday, September 22nd | Sacramento State Campus – Student Union | Sacramento, CA

Tuesday, September 27th | Pasadena Convention Center | Pasadena, CA

Thursday, September 29th | Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina | San Diego, CA




About the California State University

The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 477,000 students and 56,000 faculty and staff. Nearly 40 percent of the CSU's undergraduate students transfer from California Community Colleges. The CSU was created in 1960 with a mission of providing high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 132,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.​

Aspiring student getting information at booth
California State University to Host 'College Night' College Fairs
Whats-New-at-the-CSU.aspx
  
9/6/2022 9:20 AMBeall, Alex9/6/20229/6/2022 10:40 AMThese advancements aim to improve the overall experience for CSU students.Student SuccessStory

As fall approaches and students head back to school, there​ are​ a few new things they might find on their respective CSU campuses—whether it's a new building or stadium, a new dean of their college or a new piece of technology to enhance their studies.

Take a quick tour of the CSU campuses to find out what's new this school year.

Leadership

​​CSUMB President Vanya Quiñones

CSU Monterey Bay President Vanya Quiñones assumed leadership on August 15, 2022.​

Each year brings new faces to the campuses, but some are seeing exciting changes at the top level of leadership. Both CSU Monterey Bay and Sonoma State will have new presidents this year. CSUMB's President Vanya Quiñones is taking over from retiring President Eduardo Ochoa, and Sonoma State's President Ming-Tung “Mike" Lee is serving in an interim role.

Other campuses will see their share of new vice presidents:

  • CSU Channel Islands welcomed Eboni Ford Turnbow, Ph.D., vice president for Student Affairs.
  • Chico State appointed Monique Sendze, Ed.D., vice president for Information Technology and chief information officer and Isaac Brundage, Ed.D., vice president for Student Affairs. The campus will also host the new project manager for the California Native American Graves and Repatriation Act, Adriane Tafoya.
  • Bobbie Porter, Ed.D., begins her tenure as the first vice president/chief diversity, equity, and inclusion officer at CSU Dominguez Hills.
  • Fresno State named Bao Johri, Ed.D., as vice president for Information Technology and chief information officer and Xuanning Fu, ​Ph.D., as pro​vost and vice president for Academic Affairs.

Academic Programs

​​CSUCI dance performance

​​​​CSU Channel Islands introduced a new dance studies major. Previously, the school only offered a performing arts major with a dance emphasis.​​

Students at several campuses will also find new degree and academic programs to enrich their learning experiences.

CSU Bakersfield is offering a new history degree with a concentration in social science teaching that will combine a traditional history degree with courses counting toward a social science teaching credential.

CSU Channel Islands introduced a dance studies major, while Fresno State created bachelor of music degrees in composition, instrumental performance, jazz studies and vocal performance—which will require students to meet more rigorous standards than when the degrees were bachelor of arts.

Sacramento State has a new master of arts in Universal Design for eLearning, and San Francisco State introduced a new Migration and Refugee Studies undergraduate certificate​ that teaches the "economic, political and environmental displacement of people within countries and across borders." San Diego State's Imperial Valley campus launched an accelerated pre-licensure bachelor of science in nursing, which will help address the nursing shortage by allowing first-years to complete the program in three years and transfer students in two years. In addition, Cal State San Bernardino partnered with the Stater Bros. grocery store chain to develop the Stater Bros. Markets Online Bachelor of Arts in Administration Degree Completion Program to increase access to higher education in the Inland Empire, especially for the chain's employees.

Other new programs will help with professional development and networking. CSU Dominguez Hills's new Japan Job Training program, created in partnership with the Japanese Consulate and local Japanese businesses, will introduce students to international industry leaders and work opportunities. And, CSU Bakersfield is launching a free 10-week venture accelerator program in its new Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation for the CSUB community.

Student Support Services

​​Cooking demonstration at CSULB Beach Kitchen

​​​​Cal State Long Beach s​​tudents participate in the "Healthy Home Cooking: Build Burrito Lettuce Cups" cooking class hosted by ASI's Sustain U at the new Beach Kitchen, which opened in April 2022​​ as part of the ASI Beach Pantry.​

A student's experience on campus, however, goes well beyond the academic and professional realm. The CSU aims to provide a holistic approach to caring for a student through efforts like Basic Needs programs, the Equal Opportunity Program (EOP)​ and mental health and wellness services. To meet those needs, campuses are constantly improving and adding student services.

This fall, Chico State is opening The Well, a new student wellness center at Bell Memorial Union. Students will find a place to study, create art, take naps, participate in wellness activities like yoga and meditation, get a massage and receive nutritional and financial counseling—among other things.

Cal State Long Beach has likewise implemented a new wellness initiative, Beach WELL, to ensure students can access mental health support with help from the entire campus community. The initiative also includes elements to support students' family members, who are likely the first points of contact for struggling students. In addition, the new Beach Kitchen, an extension of CSULB's ASI Beach Pantry, will teach students to cook nutritious, culturally-inclusive meals using the pantry staples available.

Other new services will help strengthen students' sense of belonging on campus, increase access to higher education for underrepresented populations and provide overall support. Cal Poly San Luis Obispo will add a Latinx Center to its mix of campus resource centers, CSUN launched its Bridge to the Future: Black Scholars Matter program to provide tuition-free college to local students of African descent, and Cal State East Bay held its first Summer Transition Empowerment Program to help students from underserved communities transition to life on campus.

Additionally, CSU Dominguez Hills introduced Student Success Centers into each of its six colleges to improve student retention by providing college-based advising, mentorship, counseling and more.

Buildings and Facilities

​​Congresswoman Norma Torres and Cal Poly Pomona President Soraya M. Coley tour the new Liquid Rocket Lab.

​​​​Congresswoman Norma Torres and Cal Poly Pomona President Soraya M. Coley tour the campus's new Liquid Rocket Lab at the April 2022 grand opening.

This year, campuses are also opening new doors of opportunity for students literally as they unveil new buildings and facilities.

To provide more research opportunities, Chico State's new FinTech Lab will provide students access to financial software and trading technology including the Bloomberg Terminal, a finance platform with real-time data and analytics, and Cal Poly Pomona opened the Liquid Rocket Lab where aerospace engineering students will work to make CPP the first university to launch a liquid-fueled rocket. Cal State Fullerton is introducing The Latinx Lab for Storytelling and Social Justice in its Chicana and Chicano Studies Department, and San Diego State opened a Mesoamerican Studies Center in Oaxaca, Mexico to facilitate transborder research. Cal Poly San Luis Obispo is finishing up construction on the William​ and Linda Frost Center for Research and Innovation, which will house research and learning facilities for various colleges

In addition, Cal State East Bay's new CORE building will be home to facilities like the university library and the Hub for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Fresno State is welcoming students into the new Lynda and Stewart Resnick Student Union and expanded its SCOUT transportation services for students with disabilities, and Cal Poly Humboldt opened a new campus store at its Arcata location. Stanislaus State focused efforts on its Stockton campus to upgrade the student lounge, recreation room, library and food services—with plans to open a food pantry.

Cal State Fullerton and CSU San Marcos have also built new residential halls to house their growing student bodies, with the latter also opening its first student dining hall, Campus Way Cafe.

And, campuses didn't forget about their sports—and esports—teams. Cal State Fullerton constructed new baseball and softball facilities as well as an Olympic-sized, 53-meter pool, which will be filled with the men's water polo team for the first time since 1985 and the campus's first women's water polo team. Cal State San Bernardino opened its Esports Arena in May, and San Diego State's football team took the field for the first time at the new Snapdragon Stadium for a preseason scrimmage in August.

Technology and Equipment

​​Chico State's mobile classroom

Tal Slemrod, Ph.D., Chico State Educational Technology and Distance Learning program coordinator, with the campus's ​​new mobile classroom, which has enough interior seating to serve aboout a dozen students. The exterior screen also allows the university to serve larger groups​.​

Lastly, students will also see some technology changes on campus and online.

Cal State Long Beach introduced its Elbee Chat Bot for students to ask questions on the website, CSUN launched its updated website and acquired new ethnic studies-related databases and digital archives for the library, San Diego State released its mobile safety app “SDSU Safe" and San José State's new SJSU Online initiative will enable adults to return to school and complete their bachelor's degrees online.

To improve remote and in-person teaching, Cal State Bernardino has added new tech tools to its classrooms. Almost 300 classrooms have new audio-visual communication tools like video cameras, microphones and touchscreen monitors thanks to the Next Generation Smart Classroom project. At the Palm Desert campus, the hospitality management program acquired virtual reality technology, Paws Radio has new station equipment and the kinesiology program added new learning software and equipment.

Science students at Sacramento State will also get to take advantage of new technology as the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics will install a Size Exclusion Chromatography-Multi Angle Light Scattering device, which enhances research on viruses.

Lastly, the Chico State School of Education and College of Communication and Education converted a Winnebago RV into a mobile classroom with desks, benches and learning technology. It will support teachers and students in rural areas of Northern California through lectures, science experiments and other educational resources​.

 

Stay up to date on the latest news and developments across the CSU's 23 campuses at Calstate.edu/news.


What's New at the CSU
Ed-Clark-Appointed-CSU-Chief-Information-Officer.aspx
  
8/31/2022 3:56 PMThropay, Janessa8/31/20228/31/2022 3:15 PM​The California State University (CSU) has appointed Ed Clark, Ed.D., to serve as Chief Information Officer. LeadershipPress Release

The California State University (CSU) has appointed Ed Clark, Ed.D., to serve as Chief Information Officer. Dr. Clark currently serves as the Vice President for Innovation and Technology Services, CIO and Chief Digital Officer at the University of St. Thomas, the largest private college in Minnesota.

“Dr. Clark brings a deep understanding of the ways in which technology can improve teaching, learning and research and lead to greater achievement for students," said Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Financial Officer Steve Relyea. “His leadership will be invaluable to the CSU as we continue to explore new and innovative solutions for our students and employees across California."

In his role at the University of St. Thomas, Clark works both internally and externally to enhance the strategic impact of technology for his university and its many stakeholders, all toward the goal of advancing student success. Under his leadership, the university developed new and greatly improved technology capabilities, while modernizing its technology infrastructure and approaches to IT services and portfolio management. Dr. Clark currently serves in many leadership roles for the university and as a board member for several public and private organizations.  

Prior to his appointment at St. Thomas, Dr. Clark was the Chief Information Officer at Minnesota State, Mankato, the largest public university in the Minnesota State University (MSU) system, where he worked and advocated for student and faculty success. He has also served as CIO for the University of Minnesota's College of Liberal Arts. In these positions, Dr. Clark was responsible for all aspects of technology, from teaching and learning technologies to research support, infrastructure and administrative computing services, and has led many strategic initiatives for these institutions. 

Dr. Clark holds a doctor of education from Minnesota State University, Mankato, a master of science in management of technology from the University of Minnesota, and a bachelor of arts in English from Florida State University.



About the California State University

The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 56,000 faculty and staff and 477,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. The CSU was created in 1960 with a mission of providing high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 132,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter. 

The Office of the Chancellor Golden Shore Building with News Update copy
Ed Clark Appointed CSU Chief Information Officer
CSU-Statement-on-Department-of-Homeland-Security-DACA-Regulations-August-2022.aspx
  
8/30/2022 10:01 AMThropay, Janessa8/30/20228/30/2022 9:45 AMThe recent action to preserve and fortify the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) policy comes as welcome news and a relief for many of the best, brightest and most dedicated students and employees of the California State University.DACAPress Release

The following statement can be attributed to CSU Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester:

“The recent action to preserve and fortify the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) policy comes as welcome news and a relief for many of the best, brightest and most dedicated students and employees of the California State University.

We commend the Biden-Harris Administration for their leadership on this critically important issue, and for their support of the thousands of Dreamers learning and working across the CSU, striving for a better life.

While this is a positive step, important work remains to be done. We are in agreement with the Administration that a swift legislative solution—one that is bipartisan and, most importantly, permanent—is still necessary to protect these current and future students and employees who make so many positive contributions to our institutions and communities."​



About the California State University

The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 477,000 students and 56,000 faculty and staff. Nearly 40 percent of the CSU's undergraduate students transfer from California Community Colleges. The CSU was created in 1960 with a mission of providing high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 132,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

CSU Statement on Department of Homeland Security DACA Regulations, August 2022
CSU-Statement-on-Federal-Plan-for-Targeted-Debt-Cancellation.aspx
  
8/24/2022 2:27 PMThropay, Janessa8/24/20228/24/2022 2:10 PMThe California State University is committed to providing an affordable, high-quality education for all Californians, and reducing the burden of debt for our students is another critical step.AffordabilityPress Release

The following statement can be attributed to CSU Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester:

“The California State University is committed to providing an affordable, high-quality education for all Californians, and reducing the burden of debt for our students is another critical step to ensure that they start their careers on solid financial footing. At the CSU, fewer than half our students borrow, and those that do borrow significantly less than the national average.

Nearly half of the CSU's undergraduate students are Pell Grant recipients, so today's announcement is welcome news for many. With even less debt, these students and our recent alumni will be better positioned to strengthen the California workforce and communities throughout the state as they pursue their professional and personal dreams.

I applaud and thank the Biden-Harris Administration for their dedication and ongoing efforts to support our students.

Increasing the maximum Pell Grant award to $13,000 is another important strategy for making higher education accessible and affordable, and would greatly reduce the need for CSU students to take on debt while in college. We will continue to work with our federal leaders to advance this effort, and to ensure that a CSU education remains an unparalleled value."​


About the California State University

The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 477,000 students and 56,000 faculty and staff. Nearly 40 percent of the CSU's undergraduate students transfer from California Community Colleges. The CSU was created in 1960 with a mission of providing high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 132,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Girl sitting on the ground next to a tree
CSU Statement on Federal Plan for Targeted Debt Cancellation
summer-bridge-helps-underserved-students-navigate-college.aspx
  
8/23/2022 8:38 AMBeall, Alex8/22/20228/22/2022 8:00 AMA transitional program is helping first-time students from historically underserved backgrounds realize their potential.Educational Opportunity ProgramStory

CSU Summer Bridge PROGRAM BUILDS COMMUNITY FOR EOP STUDENTS

A transitional summer program is helping first-year students from historically underserved backgrounds realize their potential.

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California State University campuses open their doors to more than 477,000 students every fall, but the college experience begins a little earlier for Educational Opportunity Program​ (EOP) students like incoming freshman Helbert Luis. The statistics major participated this summer in a transitional program called Summer Bridge that is helping advance student readiness and improve retention.

Luis took part in California State University, Northridge's six-week residential Summer Bridge​ program in 2022, during which time he lived and studied on campus. He says the experience built up his self-confidence and instilled in him a sense of community he has never felt before.

"Where I come from [in Los Angeles] there aren't a lot of people going to college to make their lives better," Luis says. "In this program I am surrounded by people who have gone through a lot of the same experiences I have and want to succeed with me. I'm grateful to be here because it's not every day you have people there for you."

Though his parents encouraged him to pursue a career and escape the minimum wage job cycle many in his community find themselves stuck in, he says he often felt isolated and unmotivated.

"My parents were always working, so I didn't really have anyone there to ask me if I needed help with homework or extra tutoring," he says. "I felt alone at home, and it made me wonder: 'Who am I doing this for?' But coming here has changed my perspective."

Incoming CSUN student Helbert Luis "In Summer Bridge, I am surrounded by people who have gone through a lot of the same experiences I have and want to succeed with me."​   Helbert Luis, incoming CSUN student 

PROVIDING ACCESS

EOP was created in the late 1960s to provide access and support services for first-generation college students from historically disadvantaged backgrounds. Today, there is an EOP at all 23 CSU campuses serving more than 31,000 students. CSU applicants can learn about EOP and apply to the program while simultaneously applying to their desired campus through the university's online application portal, Cal State Apply.

“EOP serves California's most underserved population,” says CSUN EOP Director Shiva Parsa. “They have at least a ten-year history of being low-income, and many of their parents or guardians never graduated from middle or high school. This shows us they may not have been raised with a lot of resources and may need more skills building academically, socially and emotionally to be better prepared for the rigors of college.”

The CSU EOP improves access to higher education for these students by providing a comprehensive program of support services including academic advisement, tutoring, learning skill services and personal, educational and career counseling.

It also offers a free Summer Bridge program that provides students with an opportunity to adjust and transition to the university environment prior to the start of the fall term and introduces them to an extensive educational support network. While strengthening math, English and other academic skills, the program also allows participants to form a strong sense of belonging to the university.

"Summer Bridge is critical to student success because it helps them feel more prepared and connected to our campus," says California State University, Long Beach EOP​ Director Eduardo Leyva. "In addition to promoting academic preparation, it builds a community that improves overall student well-being."​

CSUN lecturere Glenn Omatsu leads Summer Bridge students in a discussion. Glenn Omatsu, a lecturer in CSUN's department of Asian American Studies and the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP), leads Summer Bridge students in a discussion.

BOOSTING SUCCESS

Strengthening transitional programs to improve college readiness among first-time students has been a strategy implemented by the CSU as part of its Graduation Initiative 2025, launched in 2016 to increase graduation rates, eliminate equity gaps in degree completion and meet California's workforce needs.

Most campuses require all EOP students to complete Summer Bridge before their first term, though the length of time and delivery format varies. Programs range from one week to six weeks and students can choose from residential, commuter and virtual options, depending on the campus. And, campuses like Fresno State University, for example, have recently expanded eligibility to include transfer students as well as first-time freshmen.

EOP staff help students resolve any issues with their financial aid, secure housing and employment for the fall term and facilitate in-depth presentations and workshops about campus resources like the library, health center, basic needs program and counseling.

"​EOP students are less likely to reach out when they have questions or need help," Parsa says. "During Summer Bridge, we introduce them to representatives from each of the campus's support services so they can build a relationship with them before they even start fall classes."

In some Summer Bridge programs, participants complete academic units that help them brush up on math and English skills. CSUN Summer Bridge students, for example, are enrolled in a general education (GE) course, part of which they complete in the summer and continue in the fall.

This is part of their EOP linked learning curriculum in which students remain with the same cohort for summer, fall and spring in a learning community for writing. Employed at other campuses as well, grouping students in an EOP cohort helps them make connections and increases their chances of persisting to their second year.

Fresno State student Samuel Chheng "The people you meet in Summer Bridge will always come back into your life to support you, whether they're your classmates, best friends or staff members." ​ Samuel Chheng, Fresno State student

During the program, students also learn important skills like budgeting, time management and self-discipline, as well as how to use their student portal and CANVAS, a learning management system used by many campuses as a supplement to in-person and virtual course material.

At Fresno State, students in the program are enrolled in a CANVAS course and engage in structured activities, assignments, quizzes and discussion board posts. The course material contains an orientation module and six learning modules that expose students to information about academic advising, major and career exploration and connections for success.

Fresno State EOP Director Mui Vuong says the primary goal of Summer Bridge is to make students feel like they are part of the university and build a support network they can lean on when confronted with a challenge.

"EOP staff members believe in our students and are incredible advocates for them," Vuong says. "We call it an EOP family because we never give up on them. If they do fall behind, they know who they can turn to for help getting back on their feet."

Fourth-year Fresno State psychology major Samuel Chheng reflects: "The most valuable thing I got from Summer Bridge was the social networking. The people you meet during the program will always come back into your life and help support you, whether they're your classmates, best friends or staff members."

Chheng, who is also pursuing a minor in Asian American Studies, participated in Summer Bridge in 2019 and says the experience inspired him to be an EOP peer mentor and become a high school counselor after graduation with the goal of helping more Southeast Asian students in Fresno pursue higher education.

"Summer Bridge and EOP offered me so much, I wish every student could participate," Chheng says. "I was nervous about attending Fresno State because I had no idea what I wanted to do or what I wanted to major in, but I learned so much about myself in the program and it even helped me decide my career path."

Vuong says participation in Summer Bridge and the subsequent support from EOP leads to higher retention and graduation rates. As of fall 2020, the first-year retention rate for Fresno State EOP students who completed Summer Bridge is 84 percent, compared to a campus-wide first-year retention rate of 76.9 percent. Additionally, the six-year graduation rate for Fresno State EOP regularly admitted students who completed Summer Bridge is 71.9 percent compared to a campus-wide six-year graduation rate of 56.6 percent.

CSUDH Summer Bridge students at a "Fun Friday" bowling event. CSU Dominguez Hills Summer Bridge students participate in "Fun Friday" activities like bowling to help them form bonds and increase their sense of belonging to the university.

making connections​

In addition to teaching academic and life skills, EOP staff plan fun activities like movie nights, talent shows, potlucks and more to help students make friends and form lifelong connections. At California State University, Dominguez Hills, Summer Bridge students take part in Fun Fridays, which involve themed, off-campus events like hiking, roller skating and bowling.

While specific activities vary by campus, Summer Bridge programs statewide have the same goals and learning outcomes, and their mission is clear: To build a community for EOP students that will support them throughout their entire college career.

"Summer Bridge celebrates first-generation students and encourages participants to be their authentic selves by creating intentional space for them to learn and support each other," says San Francisco State University EOP Director Oscar Gardea. "Doing so creates a strong community of learners who are engaged, connected and believe in each other and themselves."

For many students, the impact of the program can be felt long after they experience it. Recent San Diego State University EOP​ graduate Fabiola Moreno Ruelas says participating in Summer Bridge led to opportunities to be a peer mentor and to advocate for those who come after her.

"I met wonderful people in the program, and I was fortunate enough to have a support system so early on," Ruelas says. "Those six weeks propelled me to do so much throughout my time at SDSU, including getting involved in student government and eventually representing EOP at the highest level as the Vice President of Systemwide Affairs for the California State Student Association​."


​Listen to what Cal State Long Beach Summer Bridge students and staff have to say about the program.​

 


Learn more about the Summer Bridge program at the CSU Educational Opportunity Program website.

CSU Summer Bridge Program Builds Community for EOP students
Statement-on-Pending-Retirement-of-CSULA-President-Bill-Covino.aspx
  
9/6/2022 1:19 PMRawls, Aaron8/18/20228/18/2022 11:40 AMUnder President William Covino's leadership, student achievement has reached unprecedented heights at California State University, Los Angeles.LeadershipPress Release

​The following statement can be attributed to CSU Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester:​

“Under President William Covino's leadership, student achievement has reached unprecedented heights at California State University, Los Angeles. The university has made remarkable progress by more than doubling the four-year graduation rate for first-year students. Students coming from community colleges are achieving similar success, with their graduation rates reaching all-time highs, as well. These success measures demonstrate just a few of the ways that Dr. Covino has positively impacted the university. Cal State LA also ranks in the very highest echelon of the nation's universities when it comes to driving upward social mobility for its students.

Under his guidance, Cal State LA has also gained renown for its innovative academic and student-support programming, and has established vital community partnerships that serve as models for the rest of the California State University.

Over the course of more than 40 years in higher education, Bill Covino has transformed the lives of countless students at San Diego State, Stanislaus State, Fresno State and Cal State LA, and I thank him for his many years of distinguished and dedicated service to the CSU."

On August 18, 2022, California State University, Los Angeles president William A. Covino announced that he will retire from his role as university president upon the completion of the 2022-23 academic year. Covino is the seventh president of Cal State LA and has served in the role since 2013. He joined Cal State LA after serving as provost and vice president for Academic Affairs at Fresno State. Covino also held the role of provost at Stanislaus State, and he began his career in higher education as an assistant professor at San Diego State.

T
he CSU will soon launch a national search for Covino's successor. Under university policy, the chair of the CSU Board of Trustees, Wenda Fong, and Interim Chancellor Koester will select a committee comprised of campus and community stakeholders who will be publicly announced at a later date. Campus and community input will be sought in an open forum held on the Cal State LA campus.



About the California State University

The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 477,000 students and 56,000 faculty and staff. Nearly 40 percent of the CSU's undergraduate students transfer from California Community Colleges. The CSU was created in 1960 with a mission of providing high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 132,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.​​

Bill Covino standing at podium on stage
Statement on Pending Retirement of Cal State LA President William A. Covino
Chancellor-Koester-CSU-Mission-Actions-2022.aspx
  
8/18/2022 8:36 AMRawls, Aaron8/16/20228/16/2022 8:05 AMLearn more about Dr. Jolene Koester and her goals for the California State University during this transformational time. LeadershipStory

​IN BRIEF: CHANCELLOR KOESTER'S TOP PRIORITIES

  • Restore trust in the university
  • Improve structures and processes
  • Lay groundwork for next regularly appointed chancellor
  • Collectively advocate for necessary resources


While she is the second woman in California State University history to lead the 23-university system, Jolene Koester, Ph.D., is no newcomer to the CSU. Her long and distinguished career at the university has spanned decades—from her 17 years at Sacramento St​ate University to her 11 years as president of California State University, Northridge, and more.

“The CSU has been my professional home since 1983," Dr. Koester wrote in an introductory message to the CSU community in May 2022. “I am thrilled to return to the university system I love. The CSU's core values—inclusive excellence, equity, access and transforming lives through the power of higher education—perfectly reflect my own professional values."

Dr. Koester began her role as the California State University's interim chancellor on May 1, 2022. Her appointment is expected to last at least 12 months, as the CSU Board of Trustees conducts a national search for the university's next regularly appointed chancellor.

Throughout her career, Dr. Koester has developed a well-earned reputation as an ethical and purpose-driven leader, a champion of student success and inclusive excellence, and an unwavering supporter of innovation in teaching and learning.


​​woman with glasses

​​​​Dr. Koester looks on while attending the CSU's inaugural biennial Juneteenth Symposium in June 2022 to celebrate African American history and ac​​hieve​ment and promote and sustain the anti-racism work underway across the CSU's 23 campuses.​​​​

​Purpose-Driven Leadership​

The convergence of Koester's own values with those of the CSU include a belief in the individual and societal transformations that public higher education allows. During her first report to the CSU Board of Trustees on May 24, 2022, Koester said, “The CSU has always allowed me to work and thrive through my fundamental values and need to be purpose-driven, to lead with respect, communication, inclusion, compassion, and yes, in these times and circumstances, trust."

Those values also include the recognition that all people deserve access to higher education and a commitment to diversity, equity and inclusion.

She added, “For me, the wonderful thing about the CSU is that those values don't gather dust, but rather, they're reflected in inspired work that changes lives on a daily basis in our universities across the state."

But Koester explained that she has come into her role understanding that “change is necessary and that we must do better" to carry out the CSU's work in a manner that is true to its core values.  

In her May board report, and again in her July board report, Koester outlined her four key goals for the CSU during her tenure as chancellor:

  1. Restore trust in the system—with and among the board, campus presidents, as well as students, faculty and staff.  
  2. Collaboratively assess and make appropriate improvements to structures and processes within the Chancellor's Office as we highlight and support the transformative work that takes place across the CSU's 23 campuses.
  3. Lay the groundwork for the next regularly appointed chancellor by responding to and preparing the CSU regarding the most critical operational and strategic challenges that the system faces.
  4. To collectively come together and powerfully advocate for the resources necessary to advance the CSU's academic mission.

Koester added, “In the May meeting I asked you to join with me and the board in this work. I asked you to set aside that which divides us and to be inspired by that which unites us, which is our commitment to our mission and to our students."

During the July board meeting, Chair Wenda Fong also shared her own goals for the CSU, which aligned very closely with the four priorities shared by the chancellor.

 ​

​​women smiling together at event

Dr. Koester stands with CSU Board of Trustee Chair Wenda Fong at an anniversary celebration for CSUN's ​​​Younes and Soraya Nazarian Center for the Performing Arts.​ Photo courtesy of CSUN

​​​An Inflection Point

On June 23, Koester shared a message with the CSU community on the 50th anniversary of the enactment of Title IX, to address the external systemwide assessment of Title IX practices being conducted by the firm Cozen O'Connor.

“We have been called to action—and we will answer that call. Our students, faculty and staff—all our constituents—demand it. And our mission and core values require it."

“The CSU is at an inflection point, with a unique opportunity to fundamentally change the way we treat people: our diverse and talented students, our world-class faculty and staff, our partners and friends."

Her message called for action to simultaneously strengthen both a culture of compliance and a culture of care across the CSU. 

“As we immerse California's future leaders in an authentic culture of care, our graduates will carry the impact of our work far beyond our campus borders—into every business sector and community in our great state."

And the next day, on June 24, Koester shared another message following the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade:

"Freedom—at its foundation— is about the removal of barriers. The CSU exists to remove barriers to knowledge, understanding, prosperity and the fulfillment of one's potential. Today's decision is indeed antithetical to the CSU's ideals. Our mission is to empower students from all backgrounds to freely pursue their personal and professional dreams as part of a fair and just society. The California State University community remains steadfast to that mission, and will strengthen our collective commitment to our core values."

 

Authentic Communicator

A mission- and values-driven approach is a hallmark of Dr. Koester's leadership, as her colleagues affirm:

“She leads with her values, and she is uniquely thoughtful, clear and direct about her vision. Her authenticity makes her exceptionally effective at assembling and motivating a united team to advance progress," said Dr. Sylvia Alva, executive vice chancellor of Academic and Student Affairs at the CSU Chancellor's Office.

Dr. Alva added, “I first met Dr. Koester more than a decade ago when she was a featured speaker at a higher education conference I was attending. Sitting in the audience and hearing this engaging speaker and brilliant communicator, I hoped to one day have the opportunity to work with her—and to learn from her. I was fortunate soon after to become a dean of the College of Health and Human Development at CSUN, where she was president."

Dr. Tomás D. Morales, president of Cal State San Bernardino also commented on Dr. Koester's integrity:

“I can't think of a better, more qualified or compassionate person to take the helm of the CSU as we negotiate through these difficult times. She has the expertise and familiarity not only to lead our university system, but also to benefit our students, faculty and staff—and ultimately our state and the nation—through her integrity coupled with an in-depth working knowledge of the CSU."

Morales added: “Her guidance and mentorship were quite helpful when I became president of Cal State San Bernardino. Later, when she served as a consultant to our campus while we developed our strategic plan, Jolene offered sage advice and direction to help us determine what the plan's priorities should be and how to attain them."

​Learn more about the CSU's ninth chan​cellor, Dr. Jolene Koester.

​​woman and man smiling together

Dr. Koester with Dr. Tomás D. Morales, president of Cal State San Bernardino. Photo courtesy of CSUSB​


woman smiling
Chancellor Koester: Aligning the CSU’s Mission and Actions
Photo-of-the-Year.aspx
  
9/6/2022 11:01 PMSua, Ricky8/15/20228/15/2022 8:05 AMPhotographers from each of our 23 campuses shared their favorite shot from the school year—excluding commencement—and why it captures the CSU spirit. Enjoy the photos, then vote for you​r favorite.CommunityStory
 
 
 
 
 
CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY’S

PHOTO OF THE YEAR


 

As the summer comes to a close, we take a look back at meaningful moments from the 2021-22 academic year. Photographers from each of our 23 campuses shared their favorite shot from the school year—excluding commencement—and why it captures the CSU spirit. Enjoy the photos, then vote for you​r favorite. The winning photo and ​photographer will be recognized at an upcoming CSU Board of Trustees meeting.

CSU Bakersfield

Bakersfield photo
 

Photographer: EJ Medellin, multimedia student assistant

Medellin captured this photo of Ricco Reynolds, recipient of the 2022 President's Medal for Outstanding Graduate Student, and his children: Lyla, 7, and Rory, 5. Reynolds enrolled in the nurse practitioner program at CSU Bakersfield, despite his demanding work schedule and family duties of raising two children with his wife.

CSU CHANNEL ISLANDS

CHANNEL ISLANDS photo
 

Photographer: Whitney Howard, campus photographer/videographer

CSUCI's three-day First-Generation Week celebration in November 2021 featured in-person and online options to participate, along with a virtual keynote from Estrella Serrato of the Latinx podcast Cafecito con Estrellita, which guides first-generation scholars through the path of education. The photo celebrates events and activities that provide an opportunity to build community with fellow first-gen students, faculty and staff, as well as the in-person return to the CSUCI campus.

Chico State

Chico photo
 

Photographer: Jason Halley, university photographer

This magnified detail shows a student building a small circuit in a September 2021 Chico State Linear Circuits class. Students often need to create physical device prototypes for senior capstone design projects, so learning to solder by hand is an important skill. When capturing fine details of small electronic parts, it's challenging to also see the students tasked with building them at the same time. This captivating image allows the viewer to feel a part of the scene by showing the minutiae of the tiny circuits, as well as the broader environment of the classroom.

CSU Dominguez Hills

Dominguez Hills photo
 

Photographer: Jeff Farsai, former university photographer

This photo was taken on the first day back on the CSU Dominguez Hills campus in spring 2022. The image represents the year in which CSUDH returned to a mostly in-person campus despite the continuing COVID-19 pandemic. It also showcases the campus's newest building, the Innovation and Instruction Building, which houses the College of Business Administration and Public Policy and is quickly becoming a CSUDH landmark.

Cal State East Bay

Cal State East Bay photo
 

Photographer: Garvin Tso, campus photographer/videographer

As the Cal State East Bay campus reopened in spring 2022, the Japanese Zen Garden was in full bloom. Students began populating their favorite campus spaces.

Fresno State

Fresno State photo
 

Photographer: Cary Edmondson, university photographer

Fresno State Bulldogs senior running back Ronnie Rivers finished his career as the Bulldogs' leader in touchdowns scored (52), rushing touchdowns (40), receiving touchdowns by a running back (12), receiving yards by a running back (1,417) and pass receptions by a running back (150). For this feature photograph, Rivers held a pose for more than 5 seconds as Edmondson painted the background with a light tube using a long exposure setting on the camera.

Cal State Fullerton

Cal State Fullerton photo
 

Photographer: Matt Gush, university photographer

Mariia Nikitash, a freshman tennis player from Ukraine whose family remains in the country during the ongoing conflict, embodies what CSUF stands for. With the help of faculty and staff, she is empowered to thrive despite the harsh realities she faces. She is the epitome of resilience and celebrates her heritage, knowing it makes the CSUF community even more vibrant.

Cal Poly Humboldt

Cal Poly Humboldt photo
 

Photographer: Kellie Jo Brown, campus photographer

In the hills of Honeydew, California, forestry major Ehny Patterson joined multiple agencies for a prescribed burn. The goal was to enhance fire resilience, increase native plant biodiversity and reduce fire encroachment. This image is a powerful representation of the Cal Poly Humboldt experience—hands-on learning using the surrounding environment of the North Coast as a living lab, which includes hundreds of miles of local, state and national forests. The student's sooty smile against the backdrop of a controlled burn is a glimpse of a new, more diverse generation of wildland firefighters, educated and inspired at Humboldt.

Cal State Long Beach

Cal State Long Beach photo
 

Photographer: Sean DuFrene, campus photographer

Cal State Long Beach track and field athlete T​iana Prince runs in front of the iconic Walter Pyramid, kicking up water that's reflected in the morning sunlight. The photograph encapsulates the talent and determination of CSULB's student-athletes, even in the midst of a global pandemic. The Walter Pyramid, where volleyball and basketball games are played and other ceremonies and conferences are held, has also become a symbol of the university.

Cal State Los Angeles

Cal State Los Angeles photo
 

Photographer: J. Emilio Flores, photo/video manager

Student-athletes from Cal State LA men's soccer team celebrate their first ever NCAA DII national championship after defeating University of Charleston in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Cal Maritime

Cal Maritime photo
 

Photographer: Rizal V. Aliga, web/media specialist

One of Cal Maritime's unique features is the Training Ship Golden Bear (TSGB) docked along the campus shoreline within the San Francisco Bay. The TSGB is an extension of the campus's learning and living laboratory. In the photo, a cadet is wearing a “boiler suit" walking from either a hands-on class aboard the vessel or just completing their required watch standing shift.

CSU Monterey Bay

CSU Monterey Bay photo
 

Photographer: Brent Dundore-Arias, university photographer

During his first year as university photographer, Dundore-Arias had the unique assignment of documenting the retirement of CSUMB President Eduardo Ochoa, including farewell events honoring his decade of service to the school. This image was taken at Ochoa's retirement dinner. It encompasses both the vast honor he receives publicly from the CSUMB community at large, as well as the personal side as he shares a proud smile with his wife Holly.

CSUN

CSUN photo
 

Photographer: Lee Choo, campus photographer

This photo shows the power and character of a group of essential campus workers who kept the university up and running throughout the pandemic lockdown. They continued to work on campus full time without the protection of working from home. This group is also seldom seen or recognized for their important role. This image captures their humble yet powerful spirit—one that allows the university to run flawlessly regardless of obstacles.

Cal Poly Pomona

Cal Poly Pomona photo
 

Photographer: Tom Zasadzinski, university photographer

This photo represents the essence of Cal Poly Pomona. Arabian horses are the reason the university is here as it was originally WK Kellogg's horse ranch before he donated the property to the state of California. But more importantly, the power and grace of these animals mirror ​the strength and perseverance of CPP students.

Sacramento State

Sacramento State photo
 

Photographer: Andrea Price, media production specialist

The COVID-19 pandemic heightened mental health issues for many students. After two years of hosting its annual Out of the Darkness Walk virtually, Sacramento State resumed the on-campus event—one of the nation's largest walks in support of suicide prevention. Despite persistent rain, hundreds turned out to listen to the stories of those who have suffered from mental health issues and to march together in the fight against suicide. The vibrant colors of the “Sacramento" mural, uplifting messages on poster boards and the kind smiles of the passing students illustrate the resiliency, compassion and commitment of the Hornet Family.

Cal State San Bernardino

Cal State San Bernardino photo
 

Photographer: Robert Whitehead, former campus photographer

Nicholas Bratcher is a CSUSB assistant professor of music, director of bands and author of “Rainbow Jukebox: A Concise Companion for LGBTQ+ Music Studies," which explores LGBTQ+ influences in music history. This image is a snapshot of Cal State San Bernardino's continuing commitment to diversity of people from different races, creeds, ethnicities and gender identities in academics, college life and society. The key is CSUSB's ongoing efforts to help communities on campus and off campus who are fighting for freedom and acceptance and bring awareness to those efforts.

San Diego State

San Diego State photo
 

Photographer: Scott Hargrove, Strategic Communications photographer

This aerial photo is from a two-week field research trip with Professor David L. Kimbrough's geology class. It was taken of his students conducting field work and creating geologic maps of the Poleta Folds in the White​ Mountains of California. This photo depicts SDSU's adventurous and ambitious spirit through its students who are captured here. They continue to reach for the mountain tops with globally renowned field research that is quickly helping SDSU become a Tier 1 research institution.

San Francisco State​

SF State photo
 

Photographer: Paul Asper, graphic designer

Two state-of-the-art, multistory television production studios are the centerpiece of San Francisco State University's new George and Judy Marcus Hall for the Liberal and Creative Arts. The 75,000-square-foot, four-floor building—which began hosting classes in the fall of 2021—is also home to an audio recording studio, video editing classrooms, a media presentation room and the university's radio station, KSFS. Marcus Hall is San Francisco State's first new academic building in 25 years.

San José State

San José State photo
 

Photographer: Robert C. Bain, university photographer

The image of these student-violinists playing in front of the Victory Salute (Olympic Black Power) statue of SJSU alumni Tommie Smith, '69 Social Science, '05 Honorary Doctorate, and John Carlos, '05 Honorary Doctorate, captures a sight seen daily on campus—students collaborating and sharing their gifts and talents in the midst of alumni who inspire them to reach for their goals and not be afraid to stand for something they believe in. It conveys a moment of deep appreciation for those who paved the way before them and a melodic reminder that we are connected and have a responsibility to stand against intolerance and bigotry.

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo photo
 

Photographer: Joe Johnston, university photographer

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo has always been fascinated by the boundless potential of space. This year, the on-campus observatory reopened after a pandemic hiatus to empower students leading Learn by Doing projects. Johnston captured an evening with physics student Kailei Gallup in December when the observatory was aglow with curious researchers. Gallup angled the observatory's telescopes toward a shimmering night sky to gather data on exoplanet transits for her senior project. She is one of many Mustangs—from alumni astronauts to students launching miniature satellites—who are shaping the future of space exploration.

CSU San Marcos

CSU San Marcos photo
 

Photographer: Ryan Wolf, University Communications student photography intern

The César Chávez statue, the first outdoor public art piece at CSUSM, stands at the center of the campus as a symbol of resilience and empowerment. The words, “Sí, Se Puede. It Can Be Done," reflect the persistent spirit of the students and university.

Sonoma State

Sonoma State photo
 

Photographer: Alexis Perez, student worker

The photo is a glimpse of the library clock tower between a few trees at Sonoma State University, providing a different and unique perspective. It's symbolic because the campus is now in a better time and state since the pandemic and recovering from time lost when CSU campuses were closed during COVID-19.

Stanislaus State

Stanislaus State photo
 

Photographer: Justin Souza, media production specialist

Stan State students sit outside the new University ​Student Center, which opened January 2020, right before the pandemic shutdown in March 2020. This photo is hopeful. Seeing students together after going through the challenges of a pandemic provides a sense of overcoming and perseverance through a variety of obstacles over the past two years. 

Photo of the Year
Raise-the-BAR-August-11th-Summit.aspx
  
8/15/2022 2:30 PMThropay, Janessa8/11/20228/11/2022 12:40 PMThe Raise the B.A.R. (Bold + Action + Results in College Excellence & Equity) August 11th Summit provided the CSU with the opportunity to shed light on the positive impact of its own university-wide Graduation Initiative 2025. Student SuccessStory

​The Raise the B.A.R. (Bold + Action + Results in College Excellence & Equity) August 11th Summit, hosted by U.S. Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona, provided the CSU with the opportunity to shed light on the positive impact of its own university-wide Graduation Initiative 2025. The event was attended by roughly 60 of the nation's most experienced leaders in public and private non-profit higher education, and the focal point of the summit was to engage in meaningful conversations on best practices and proven methods for equitably increasing student success.

CSU Chancellor Koester stated, “As the nation's largest and most diverse four-year public university system, the California State University is committed to leading the way in closing equity gaps and ensuring that students from all backgrounds achieve the lifelong, life-transforming benefits of a college degree. We are thrilled to join the U.S. Department of Education and our peers in higher education from across the country in sharing wisdom, inspiration and strategies as we work together toward a more equitable world."

The summit began with a presentation on building community. Honorary speakers, including Dr. Michelle Asha Cooper, Office of Postsecondary Education, and Dr. Cindy Marten, Deputy Secretary of the U.S. Department of Education, broke down the methods of creating a sense of belonging to improve student success.

Since its inception in 2015, the CSU's Graduation Initiative 2025 has led to unprecedented gains in graduation rates throughout the university and has reached all-time highs for students from all backgrounds. Approximately 25,000 more students earned CSU bachelor's degrees in 2020-21 than in the year before the initiative was launched. This increase is equivalent to graduating an additional university with an enrollment the size of Fresno State.

However, equity gaps remain and even increased incrementally during the pandemic, leading to a call from CSU leadership to redouble university efforts to reduce these stubborn gaps that impact underrepresented students and students of color. 

In 2021 the CSU's Graduation Initiative 2025 Advisory Committee established key priorities to address these challenges, and those efforts have led to early successes through campus actions. These include implementing robust outreach efforts to reengage students who left the 2019 and 2020 cohorts; applying student success management systems to identify categories of students and the barriers they may be facing in order to have a greater impact; and anticipating and implementing the types of services returning students need to ensure their continued success.

Each of the 23 CSU presidents has assembled expert teams to develop their own ambitious, data-informed action plans to close equity gaps present on their campuses. New data will be released in fall 2022 demonstrating the continued impact of Graduation Initiative 2025 on the CSU system as a whole.

Throughout the summit, those in attendance participated in breakout sessions featuring small groups providing leaders the opportunity to share their experiences in improving graduation and retention rates. Cal State​ Fullerton's President Framroze Virjee was asked to lead a discussion on navigating the transfer process, and CSU Dominguez Hills'​ President Thomas Parham was asked to take the lead on a session focused on student well-being and basic needs.

Secretary Cardona wrapped the summit with an emphasis on the future: a “new vision for higher education." Attendees were encouraged to engage in a final facilitated discussion focused on moving forward together to accomplish the goals and priorities set before them. Following the discussion, U.S. Department of Education Under Secretary James Kvaal brought the summit to a close.


Learn more about the CSU's university-wide initiative ​to increase graduation rates for all CSU students while eliminating opportunity and achievement gaps.

Leaders of Higher Education at August 11th Summit
CSU Leadership Shares Graduation Initiative Success Stories with Education Leaders Across the Nation
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