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CaliforniansForAll-College-Corps-Launch-2022.aspx
  
1/21/2022 5:52 AMKelly, Hazel1/20/20221/20/2022 8:00 AMUp to 1,300 CSU students who complete service time during the 2022-23 academic year can receive $10,000 while gaining career-relevant experience.CaliforniaStory

​California State University students who volunteer for public service hours at 16 campuses can soon earn money to help pay for college, thanks to the #CaliforniansForAll College Corps, a $146 million investment through the 2021-22 Governor's California Comeback Plan. 

In its first round of funding, the Office of the Governor's California Volunteers selected 45 colleges and universities statewide—which includes 16 CSU institutions—to serve as College Corps partner campuses: CSU Bakersfield,  Chico State, CSU Dominguez HillsCal State East Bay, Fresno State​, Humboldt State​, Cal State Long Beach, Cal State LA, CSU Monterey Bay, Cal Poly Pomona, Sacramento State, Cal State San Bernardino​, San Francisco State, San José State, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo and Stanislaus State.

For the 2022-23 academic year, up to 1,355 CSU students from the partner campuses will benefit from this unique opportunity to gain valuable work experience and make a positive impact in their communities, while simultaneously earning money to help pay for their education. Students who complete a year of service will receive $10,000 ($7,000 stipend/living allowance, plus a $3,000 Education Award). In addition, #CaliforniansForAll College Corps is the first statewide service program available to AB540 eligible Dreamers​

Each participating university will receive a 19-month grant to support first the planning, and then the program implementation for the first year of the College Corps on their campus. Service opportunities will include critical issue areas such as climate action, K-12 education and COVID-19 recovery. 

The new College Corps program is very much aligned with the CSU's own mission of public service and decades-long commitment to providing opportunities for impactful community engagement for students, particularly those from historically underserved communities. In fact, in 2019-20, 64,000 CSU students—13% of the total student population—contributed 934,000 hours of service to their communities through service-learning.

The College Corps was modeled after a pilot program launched in 2020 called the Civic Action Fellowship. Three CSU campuses (Los Angeles, San José and Stanislaus) participated in the pilot, and Civic Action Fellow Ian Chavez, a third-year computer science major at San José State, spoke during the California Volunteers press conference on January 18, describing his service experience as​ life changing.

“When the Civic Action Fellowship became available, it was a great way for me to receive a living allowance and education award for my service, which includes providing access to computer science to underserved kids, which is really important to me," Chavez said. “The SJSU Civic Action Fellows are opening doors for young people who might never have found their love of coding or other STEM topics because of their circumstances. So if someone pursues a STEM major and helps diversify the industry at the expense of several hours of my time, I think that's an amazing exchange and so worthwhile." Chavez is in his second year as a Civic Action Fellow, and this year is serving as a Lead Fellow.

“The California State University students who participated in the pilot program over the past year took their world-class CSU education and translated that into on-the-ground tutoring and mentoring in their communities," said CSU Chancellor Joseph I. Castro. “This program is an invaluable opportunity for our students to not only give back to their communities, but also to help prepare the next generation of CSU students for success. We look forward to even greater opportunities for the students selected through the inaugural year of the Corps."

A growing body of research shows that volunteerism not only improves the lives of those served, it enriches the lives of those who serve. And integrating academics with community service results in greater student engagement, supporting more timely college completion and advancing student success.

The CSU joins with the University of California, California Community Colleges and the Association of Independent California Colleges and Universities (AICCU) in collective commitment to uplifting communities and empowering the next generation of diverse, civic-minded and compassionate leaders.   


For more information about service-learning, visit the CSU Center for Community Engagement website. For specifics on each campus' forthcoming #CaliforniansForAll College Corps program, please contact the campus directly.

woman with glasses holding a paintbrush and smiling as she squats next to an outdoor wall mural she is painting
16 CSU Campuses Selected as #CaliforniansForAll College Corps Partners
increasing-the-diversity-of-csu-faculty.aspx
  
1/18/2022 4:21 PMMcCarthy, Michelle1/18/20221/18/2022 8:00 AMCDIP aims to increase the number of diverse faculty needed to teach the university’s unique student population.DiversityStory

increasing the diversity of csu faculty

The California State University Chancellor's Doctoral Incentive Program prepares future faculty who are needed to teach the university’s unique student population. Fellows learn to be student role models, advocates and mentors as they pursue their doctorate degrees.


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“Diversifying our faculty is inextricably tied to our success in closing equity gaps and increasing graduation rates. I’m encouraged that almost half of the new tenure-track faculty we hired [in 2021] are people of color…and we can do even better than that in the coming years.”
–​ Chancellor Joseph I. Castro


Inspiration works in mysterious ways, but sometimes all it takes is seeing the possibilities in life. As tennis legend and Cal State LA alumna Billie Jean King once said, “You have to see it to be it.” And that’s exactly why Chancellor Joseph Castro has placed diversifying CSU faculty high on his list of priorities.

One way of moving the dial on this is through The California State University Chancellor's Doctoral Incentive Program​ (CDIP), which prepares promising doctoral students for CSU faculty positions. They receive mentorship from CSU faculty, professional development and grant resources, and if needed, financial support in the form of a forgivable loan. The program aims to recruit future faculty, mostly from among our own undergraduate and graduate programs, and deepen their commitment to educating the most ethnically, economically and academically diverse student body in the nation. Faculty mentors, from campuses across the CSU, are critical to preparing fellows to carry out the CSU mission.​

Here are just a few of the CDIP fellows who returned to teach at a CSU campus and are inspiring the next generation.

GABBY MEDINA FALZONE

GABBY MEDINA FALZONE, PH.D.
Chico State, Assistant Professor of Multicultural and Gender Studies, CDIP Cohort 2018-’19, Faculty Sponsor from Cal State East Bay

Why do you think having diverse faculty is important?
There are things those from historically oppressed communities understand that can’t be taught through a textbook or a journal article. As a queer, Puerto Rican, brown, cis woman who has experienced homelessness and doesn’t know how to speak Spanish, no textbook I ever read really got at my life experiences. Not only do my identities and experiences give me tools to support students from similar backgrounds, but they also help me support students from other oppressed backgrounds by letting them know that even though our experiences with oppression may be different, I can relate to the impact of oppression and will be there to support them on their journey. Having faculty that represents the diversity of the student body can help students feel like they, too, can one day excel in academia or other careers in their field of interest.

Tell me about a time when you were able to help one of your students with their unique needs.
One Filipina student, when she was asking me for a letter of recommendation for grad school, told me how she remembered me telling her that one reason there were so few academic articles on Filipinx experiences was because there were still so few Filipinx academics. At the time, I had encouraged her to think about getting into academics to change that. I can’t even tell you how fulfilling it was to write her letter of recommendation a few years later.

What has it been like to return to the CSU as a faculty member?
Since I was a San Francisco State undergrad, I’ve wanted to teach at a CSU. I am passionate about helping low-income, first-gen students of color and others from different oppressed communities realize their full potentials. I often tell my students how brilliant they are and that they can go to grad school, law school or other continuing education if they want. I want to be the faculty person for them that I didn’t have.


JOELY PROUDFIT, PH.D.

JOELY PROUDFIT, PH.D.
CSU San Marcos, Department Chair of American Indian Studies, CDIP Cohort 1993-’94, Faculty Sponsor from Cal State Long Beach

Tell me about a time when you were able to help one of your students with their unique needs.
​I have been teaching at the CSU since 1995, at Cal State Long Beach, SFSU, Cal State San Bernardino and now CSUSM, which resides on the traditional territory and homelands of the Luiseño/Payómkawichum people. During this time, I have had the opportunity to engage with hundreds of American Indian and Alaska Native students, assisting them in academic, career and sometimes life choices. I have helped students to move out of homes and situations where domestic violence was occurring, seek sobriety and counseling, dream beyond a four-year degree, move beyond feelings of insecurity and invisibility and seek action and justice. My students have helped pass legislation, become leaders in American Indian public health, grown tribal economies and created innovative strategies and art.

How did the CDIP program change the trajectory of your career?
I have cherished the good fortune I have had in my life, from having exclusive dinners with heads of state to serving as a U.S. Presidential appointee, from being appointed as the first Indigenous woman to the California Commission on the Status of Women and Girls to creating narrative change in Hollywood and beyond. The people and places I have engaged with are a direct result of my education. As a young professor in the late 1990s, I was asked by my tribal community to participate in commercials to educate audiences about Proposition 5: The Tribal Government Gaming and Economic Self-Sufficient Act of 1998. This was the first time a minority population had ever passed a proposition in the United States. Prop 5 allowed for tribal governments in California to operate tribal gaming on tribal lands. This changed the economies and futures of the Tribes California forever. The CDIP program provided the initial investment toward earning my doctorate and providing me with the tools necessary to make the impact for my community and beyond.

What has it been like to return to the CSU as a faculty member?
​​I am blessed to be a Luiseño/Payómkawichum scholar who works, teaches and lives on the traditional territory and homelands of my ancestors, the Luiseño/Payómkawichum people. While I am often recruited and invited to lead other institutions, this is my home and I am investing in the California Indian Culture and Sovereignty Center at CSUSM and building the most robust American Indian Studies department for our students and community.


WINNY DONG 

WINNY DONG, PH.D.
Cal Poly Pomona, Professor and Director of Projects & Research, College of Engineering, CDIP Cohort 1995-’00, Faculty Sponsor from Cal State Long Beach

Tell me about a time in your life when you were impacted by having a faculty member who looked like you or had similar life experiences.
My father was a professor in mechanical engineering at CSULB for about 30 years. He was definitely my inspiration to teach at a CSU. I saw that he enjoyed his job and built strong relationships with his students—both of those things made me think that teaching at a CSU was something I wanted to pursue. He was also the person who made me aware of the CDIP opportunity and really encouraged me after I got my Ph.D. to apply for teaching positions. Other mentors at CPP, who all played important roles in my career, are Drs. Debra Brum and Cordelia Ontiveros. They encouraged me and advocated for me but more importantly, they made me feel like I could talk to them about my concerns and didn't have to hide what I was feeling. Having female role models and mentors helped me feel less alone in engineering and that CPP was the right place for me to succeed.

Tell me about a time when you were able to help one of your students with their unique needs.
I have had students who told me they feel they can tell me certain things because of my race or gender. But I've also had students who confided in me who are very different from me outwardly. I think my strength as a mentor comes from being a patient listener and asking students questions about their motivation, fears and aspirations. But I do know that I am not the right mentor for every student. Some students need role models with different life experiences than I've had, so I think it is really important for the university to have a diversity of faculty members with different backgrounds so every student can have the opportunity to find the mentor who is right for them.



BRANDILYNN J. VILLARREAL, PH.D.

BRANDILYNN J. VILLARREAL, PH.D.
Humboldt State, Assistant Professor of Psychology, CDIP Cohort 2010-’11, Faculty Sponsor from​ CSU Dominguez Hills

Tell me about a time in your life when you were impacted by having a faculty member who looked like you or had similar life experiences.
I attended a UC for my undergraduate and there were fewer faculty and students at that time who looked like me. When I attended a master’s program at a CSU, I was ecstatic to interact with faculty and students from more diverse backgrounds. It felt like home and I never wanted to leave. The faculty in the Psychology Department at CSU Dominguez Hills were incredible mentors and helped me immensely with continuing on to a Ph.D. program.

Tell me about a time when you were able to help one of your students with their unique needs because you could relate to them on a deep level.
I am a multi-ethnic individual and a member of the LGBTQIA community. Because I share my identities with students, this creates opportunities for them to connect and relate to me on a deeper level. I know how much it meant to me to have an educator and role model identify as Latinx or queer, and now that I am in this position, students communicate what it means to them. One student in particular started a conversation during office hours because she was grateful I had a picture of two women as a couple when talking about romantic relationships in young adulthood. This was the first time she had seen visual representation and validation of her identity and relationship in a class. This facilitated a bond with the student, and we had several more conversations. She also joined my research group.

How did CDIP change the trajectory of your career?
It allowed me to pursue my goal of teaching at a CSU by helping me prepare for this goal early. I knew the summer I entered my Ph.D. program that I would be working toward this goal and it provided the extra motivation and resources to succeed.

Why do you think having faculty who are diverse is important?
​It is incredibly important for the faculty and staff demographics at the CSU to match that of the student population. Students benefit from positive role models, feel a greater connection to the university/department and strengthen their academic identities when they are represented by faculty, staff and administration at their institution. The student body at the CSU is incredibly diverse, yet nationwide approximately 70 percent of faculty are white.


OCTAVIO VILLALPANDO, PH.D.

OCTAVIO VILLALPANDO, PH.D.
Cal State LA, Vice President for Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Student Life, CDIP Cohort 1993-’94, Faculty Sponsor from CSUN

Tell me about a time in your life when you were impacted by having a faculty member who looked like you or had similar life experiences.
I took a class as a master’s student at CSUN, and a Chicano professor pulled me aside and said, ‘Have you thought about getting a Ph.D. and entering an academic career? It’s not as challenging as you might expect.’ As a first-generation student, I never saw myself entering that space until then. It allowed me to meet some of the goals I had, which is to give back to my community. The greatest impact in my career has come from faculty of color and faculty who share similar life experiences as me—what it's like to grow up in a working class family without having any aspirations to pursue a doctoral degree. Faculty of color have been essential to my ability to see this career path as a reality.

Why do you think it's important to have diverse faculty?
At the turn of the 19th century, we saw this growing number of colleges for women; they went out and specifically recruited women to teach in those universities. The idea behind that was there was a shared experience that women would be able to understand. The same is true for students of color. If we see ourselves represented by a professor who brings material into the learning process that’s based on their own lived experience, it brings multiple perspectives into their classroom. It only enriches the educational experience for students. There's a difference when you have students who can identify culturally, ethnically, racially or by gender with faculty who bring a different life experience into the classroom.

What has it been like to come back to the CSU as a faculty member?
The majority of our students are working class who have very high educational aspirations. To me, that’s what it's about because they represent my life experience. I spent almost 20 years at a research institution, publishing and introducing all sorts of theoretical concepts. I have had my research cited by the U.S. Supreme Court as evidence for maintaining affirmative action in the admissions process. But nothing comes close to the opportunity of being able to see students from local communities who never imagined themselves in college succeeding and thriving at an institution like ours.

SIX FACTS ABOUT CDIP

  1. It is the largest program of its kind in the U.S.
  2. CDIP offers monthly programs to help fellows learn about the academic job market and publishing.
  3. Doctoral candidates are linked with a mentor who will guide them through their doctoral program and to their professional career.
  4. Fellows have the opportunity to use grant funds to further their doctoral training and attend professional conferences and workshops.
  5. The PRE-Professor Program (PREPP) supports CDIP Fellows’ transition to faculty positions by engaging them in a semester-long program at a CSU campus.
  6. An annual CDIP directory is circulated among campuses that includes information on fellows seeking CSU faculty appointments​.

Find out more about the opportunities the CSU’s CDIP provides.

​​
Increasing the Diversity of CSU Faculty
Down-to-Business.aspx
  
1/10/2022 9:00 AMSua, Ricky1/10/20221/10/2022 6:50 PMA conversation with three alumni currently serving as president and CEO of chambers of commerce.AlumniStory
dealing with loss

Down to Business

A conversation with three alumni currently serving as president and CEO of chambers of commerce.​


 

With 4 million living alumni spread throughout the globe, the CSU has former students serving as decision-makers across​ a spectrum of industries, organizations and governmental bodies. This includes a number who are involved with chambers of commerce, organizations that promote and advocate for their local business communities. We asked three CSU alumni acting as their chambers' presidents and CEOs to reflect on their work, the CSU and the upcoming year.​

Jennifer Barrera​

President & CEO, Cali​fornia Chamber of Commerce
CSU Bakersfield, B.A. English '98​

What inspires your work at Cal Chamber?
​When I joined the organization, I believed in their mission, which is to provide resources and advocacy on behalf of businesses in California. And I'm still motivated by that mission. The businesses and employers in California are what create the lifestyle we have here in California. They create the jobs, they provide the benefits, they are the innovators who we turn to in California for so many different things, such as in the pharmaceutical world or our technology. To be able to represent those companies, tell their stories and advocate on their behalf is an honor.

We are going into a very challenging legislative year, and there's going to be a lot of uncertainty. We'll be working very hard in the advocacy space to mitigate any problematic mandates and try to advance any positive policies that will assist businesses as we hopefully are on our road to recovery from this pandemic.

How did your experience at the CSU prepare you for your current role or help you on your career journey?
CSU Bakersfield at the time was a small community where you had a personal relationship and connection with a lot of your professors and instructors, and I just felt a sense of community there, which was a very supportive environment in which to learn. I got an English degree, but I can't tell you how well that has served me in the roles I have been in, including this one today. The importance, emphasis and challenge those instructors put on me when I was obtaining my English degree to be a better writer and to do analysis of literature … helped provide me with a solid base to do a ton of legal writing in law school and now to do a ton of the advocacy writing in the position I'm in. I am very grateful for the foundation it provided me to help me elevate my career.

What advice would you give to students graduating this year?
Never underestimate what you can do. Set goals and know that despite whatever challenges you may have, you can achieve them. Hard work, perseverance and always being prepared is a mantra I've lived by. You have the resources available to have a successful career because you have already chosen to become more educated, which is an amazing first step.


​José Solache

President & CEO, Greater Lakewood Chamber of Commerce; City of Lynwood Mayor Pro Tem
​CSU Dominguez Hills, B.A. Liberal Studies '06​

What will motivate your work this coming year?
In 2021, at least in part of it, we experienced the post-pandemic reality. We're going into a more normal status in 2022, but there's still an overlap of the pandemic not being fully gone,. So, how do we fully come out of this pandemic? How do we use some of those things we learned, specifically technology, to better serve our business community, and how do we operate best using these tools? As chambers, we're always looking at how we connect with the business community and the different connecting groups.

How did your experience at the CSU help you on your career journey?
I was definitely a student who was very involved and engaged. I took being involved to a whole different level, in a sense, from being engaged in a club on campus to campus activities the university puts together to ultimately becoming the student vice president of the university. My experiences as a student and my involvement led me to a career where I could be a leader in my own organization, but more specifically, I get to interact with folks and be that people person. The CSU gave me that hands-on experience I needed to understand what I was going to flourish in to be a vibrant person and be myself essentially. I wanted to find a job that gave me the opportunity to be in that same atmosphere, that same environment—not necessarily a safe space, but a space in which to be an advocate and a voice.

What advice would you give to students graduating this year?
First, celebrate the moment you have accomplished. I think we only get that moment once in our life, which is a happy and successful moment you've accomplished. Then, use that degree and see where it takes you. Don't limit yourself to that one career you essentially went to school for. Use it to ideally go to that field you studied for, but note that the possibilities are endless, especially after receiving a degree from the CSU.


Bob Linscheid​

President & CEO, Walnut Creek Chamber of Commerce & Visitors Bureau; CSU Trustee Emeritus
​Chico State, B.A. Public Administration '75, M.A. Public Administration '78​

How did your experience at the CSU prepare you for your current role?
When I was a student at Chico State, I was elected president of the Associated Students and became involved in the Cal State Student Association. During my term of office, it was a tumultuous time in Chico State history. The unrest was centered around previous wars, political unrest and a desire for local control [at the campus-level]. But Chico State also provided opportunities for students to be engaged at all levels of the university—from faculty evaluations to selection committees. Also, the student government owned and operated all of the campus enterprises (bookstore, food services, student union). This was unique in the CSU at the time. I learned the important lesson of listening to all sides of an issue and providing the opportunity for students to be engaged in the governance process.

Later during my involvement with the Alumni Association, I was Chico State's representative to the CSU Alumni Council and was elected Alumni Trustee from 2005 to 2014. I served as chair of the CSU Board of Trustees from 2012 to 2014.

What advice would you give to students graduating this year?
Find a career you are passionate about.

What are your 2022 goals for the chamber?

  1. Increase the visibility and influence of the chamber.
  2. Create an environment where Walnut Creek businesses can thrive.
  3. Create partnerships to help attract innovative businesses to the region.
  4. Create world-class innovation hubs in the region.

Count the Chancellor In

In addition to the alumni working in this capacity, Chancellor Joseph I. Castro was appointed in 2021 to serve on the Board of Directors for the California Chamber of Commerce. Board members are elected by Cal Chamber members and provide leadership as the organization seeks to advocate for employers and foster a strong economy in both the state and nation. ​


Down to Business
CSU-Statement-on-Governors-2022-23-January-Budget-Proposal-.aspx
  
1/10/2022 11:34 AMSalvador, Christianne1/10/20221/10/2022 11:15 AMIn his January budget proposal, Governor Gavin Newsom outlined a multi-year compact to grow CSU base funding each year from 2022-23 through 2026-27. BudgetPress Release

​​​The following statement can be attributed to California State University (CSU) Chancellor Joseph I. Castro:

“Governor Newsom's long-term and sustainable funding proposal is a bold step that will allow the California State University to appropriately plan to welcome additional talented and diverse students and ensure their achievement throughout the course of their college careers.

“With graduation rates at all-time highs, the CSU continues to be one of California's best investments. Recurring and predictable increases to our budget allocation will lead to additional success for current students. This compact aligns with our ambitious Graduation Initiative 2025 goals of increasing graduation rates while promoting equity by eliminating the differences in completion rates between our students from underrepresented communities and their peers.

“We look forward to this ongoing partnership with Governor Newsom and encourage the Legislature to also support the multi-year compact which includes many of its own priorities. I am optimistic that the economy and the state's coffers will continue their expansion, which would allow for subsequent investments to support additional priorities included in the Board of Trustees' operating budget request. It is incumbent upon us to ensure that the CSU receives appropriate funding, from both recurring and one-time sources, in 2022-23 as well as future years."

The following statement can be attributed to Isaac Alferos, President, California State Student Association:

“Today, Governor Newsom unveiled a budget proposal that provided much needed investments to the California State University. This includes welcomed investments in affordability, deferred maintenance, and energy efficiency. The Cal State Student Association thanks the Governor for these new investments and looks forward to advocating with our higher education partners to ensure that the CSU is accessible, affordable, and sustainable for all students."

The following statement can be attributed to Dr. Robert Keith Collins, Chair, Academic Senate of the California State University:

“On behalf of the Academic Senate CSU, it is an honor to convey the genuine appreciation felt by the faculty for the proposed budgetary support for the CSU. Continued support for the CSU ensures that faculty success continues to enable student success, especially during the ongoing COVID-19 Pandemic. During these challenging times, this support will provide resources that further faculty engagement in the scholarship of teaching and learning, which will translate into the curricula students and graduates need to meet their own unique academic and workforce career goals and enable their social mobility." ​

In his January budget proposal, Governor Gavin Newsom outlined a multi-year compact to grow CSU base funding each year from 2022-23 through 2026-27. This five-year plan will increase the CSU's state general fund appropriation by at least five percent each year (or a 2.9 percent increase to the CSU's total operating budget). By 2026-27, the compact will have increased CSU's recurring base funding by nearly $1.2 billion. These resources will support the CSU's commitment to multiple student-focused goals in the areas of new enrollment, student success and equity, affordability, workforce preparedness and student technology.

For the 2022-23 fiscal year, the budget proposal would increase the CSU's state general fund support by 7.2 percent, which includes an unallocated increase of $211.1 million in support of the Board of Trustees' operating budget priorities, $81 million to increase enrollment by 9,434 full-time equivalent students in the 2022-23 academic year and $12 million to increase support for students who are foster youth, all in recurring funds.

The budget proposal also includes one-time allocations of $100 million for deferred maintenance and energy efficiency projects, $83 million to support the construction of a CSU Bakersfield Energy Innovation Center, and $50 million to support equipment and facilities at the university farms located on the Chico, Fresno, Pomona and San Luis Obispo campuses.

# # #

About the California State University

The ​California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 56,000 faculty and staff and 477,000 students. Nearly 40 percent of the CSU's undergraduate students transfer from California Community Colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 132,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter

Statements from California State University Leaders on Governor’s January 2022-23 Budget Proposal
Nursing-Pathway-Program-Expands-at-the-CSU.aspx
  
1/10/2022 8:54 AMSalvador, Christianne1/10/20221/10/2022 10:00 AMMore CSU campuses are partnering with their local community colleges after the success of the first cohorts at Cal States Fullerton and San Bernardino.NursingStory

​CSU campuses are cutting the time it takes for community college students to earn a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree.

Ten CSU campuses are now offering the ADN-to-BSN program to make the path to earning a BSN more streamlined by removing unnecessary time and costs for students to become workforce-ready.

The program enables California community college students who are working to earn their associate degree in nursing (ADN) to concurrently enroll at one of the CSU nursing programs. After receiving their ADN, students complete their final semester at the CSU and graduate with a BSN.

Cal State Fullerton and Cal State San Bernardino launched the first state-supported program of this kind in California, with each campus partnering with Riverside Community College (RCC) beginning in fall 2019.

The promising results seen from the first cohort at each campus inspired multiple CSU campuses to jump on board.

All RCC students who concurrently took classes at CSUF or CSUSB successfully transferred to the CSU. These students only took an average of three years to complete an ADN, plus an additional six to nine months to graduate with a BSN.

“The average time to complete an ADN degree has been five years, which discourages many students from furthering their education to pursue a BSN," says Margaret Brady, Ph.D., professor of nursing at Cal State Long Beach and coordinator of the ADN-to-BSN program. “This program makes the road to a BSN more feasible."

All 23 students in CSUF's cohort have passed the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX) and became licensed RNs. In addition, 16 of these graduates are now employed in health care. The CSUSB cohort will take the exam in February 2022.

The future of nursing

Dr. Brady says employers, more than ever, prefer to hire RNs with baccalaureate degrees. Those with BSNs or higher will also have more opportunities for professional growth.

“The health care environment is changing rapidly and hospitals need nurses who are prepared to meet their complex needs," explains Brady. “There's greater preference for RNs with the highest level of education as it relates to a wider range of competencies in areas not previously tied to nursing—such as administration and technical analysis."

According to the Institute of Medicine's Future of Nursing report, future nurses are expected to play a critical role in improving the health care system. Their responsibilities will be transformed, as they will need to demonstrate their expertise beyond the traditional care skillsets.

RNs must have knowledge of health policy, finance, research, and leadership skills to fully collaborate with health professionals and lead in the redesign of health care.

Developing a more diverse nursing pool

In addition to being more educated, future nurses will need to reflect the racial and ethnic makeup of the populations they serve.

“The program is intent on diversifying the pool of nurses with BSN degrees," says Brady.

“To improve the health care system, we must aim to close health disparities across people and cultures. Nurses must tear down communication barriers, lack of trust and cultural differences that prevent underserved communities from receiving proper care."

The dual-enrollment program attracts more students to pursue a BSN, including those who are eager to enter the workforce as well as underrepresented minorities.

More than 70 percent of the students in CSUF and CSUSB's first cohorts are underrepre​sented minorities—closely resembling the diversity of Riverside County, which has 70 percent minority residents and nearly half of the total households speaking a non-English language.​​​​





Nursing Pathway Program Expands at the CSU
Campus-Spring-2022-Term-Plan-Announcements.aspx
  
1/14/2022 1:21 PMKelly, Hazel1/6/20221/6/2022 11:15 AMPolicyStory

​​​​​​​​​Amid the recent surge of COVID-19, leaders at each of the CSU's 23 campuses across the state continue to monitor regional public health data that may impact the start of the spring 2022 term.

Several campuses have shared communications regarding a temporary pivot to online instruction, while some plan to remain primarily in-person. Please see communications by campus below for details. (For the most up-to-date information, we also recommend following your campus on social media.)

CSU Bakersfield (1/14)

CSU Channel Islands (1/6)

Chico State​ (1/7: spring classes to continue as planned)

CSU Dominguez Hills (1/7)

Cal State East Bay (1/6)

Fresno State (1/5)

Cal State Fullerton​ (1/7)

Humboldt State ​(1/7: spring classes to continue as planned)

Cal State Long Beach (1/6)​

Cal State LA (1/4)

Maritime Academy (1/10: ​spring classes to continue as planned)

CSU Monterey Bay (1/11: spring classes to continue as planned)

CSUN​ (1/7)​

Cal Poly Pomona (1/10)

Sacramento State (1/4)  

Cal State San Bernardino (1/11)

San Diego State (1/5)

San Francisco State (1/6)​

San San José State (1/12) 

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo​ (1/4: spring classes continue as planned)

CSU San Marcos (1/5)

Sonoma State​ (1/11)

Stanislaus State (1/12​​)

 

Please visit our campus coronavirus sites for further campus-specific updates as the situation evolves.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




young man walking outside with face mask and headphones
Campus-specific Coronavirus Updates for Spring 2022 Term
The-California-State-University-to-Require-COVID19-Vaccination-Booster-for-Spring-2022-Term.aspx
  
1/4/2022 9:03 AMKelly, Hazel12/22/202112/22/2021 8:30 AMThe new requirement calls for boosters to be received by February 28, 2022 or six months after an individual received the final dose of the original vaccination, whichever is later. PolicyPress Release

​​The California State University announced today that it will require faculty, staff and students who are accessing university facilities or programs to receive a vaccine booster shot in order to be fully immunized against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and in compliance with the university's COVID-19 vaccination policy.​

The new requirement calls for boosters to be received by February 28, 2022 or six months after an individual received the final dose of the original vaccination, whichever is later. However, individual campuses may establish an earlier date for compliance for students and non-represented employees based on local circumstances.

“Vaccination, including a booster when eligible, remains our most effective strategy against infection and severe disease," said CSU Chancellor Joseph I. Castro. “This is particularly important in light of the rapid rise of cases of COVID-19 throughout the state and nation as the Omicron variant spreads. Implementing the booster requirement now will help mitigate the potential spread of the variant on campuses as they repopulate in January after the winter break."

As announced previously, the CSU's COVID-19 vaccination policy allows students and employees to seek exemptions on medical and religious grounds.

The university's new requirement will take effect immediately upon implementation of the policy; however, represented employees will not be subject to the booster requirement until the CSU concludes its meet-and-confer process with its labor unions.

The revised policy is available at https://calstate.policystat.com/policy/10621049/latest/.​

# # #

About the California State University

The  California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 56,000 faculty and staff and 477,000 students. Nearly 40 percent of the CSU's undergraduate students transfer from California Community Colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 132,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.​

The California State University to Require COVID-19 Vaccination Booster for Spring 2022 Term
CFA-tentative-agreement-2021.aspx
  
12/20/2021 3:49 PMKelly, Hazel12/20/202112/20/2021 11:00 AMThe California State University and the California Faculty Association (CFA) have reached a tentative agreement on a successor contract. Bargaining UpdatesPress Release

​​​​​​The California State University (CSU) and the California Faculty Association (CFA) have reached a tentative agreement on a successor contract. The agreement covers the 29,000 instructional faculty, coaches, librarians and counselors across the 23 CSU campuses and, upon ratification by the CSU Board of Trustees and CFA membership, will run through June 30, 2024. The tentative agreement will be brought to the CSU Board of Trustees for approval at the upcoming meeting taking place January 25-26, 2022.

“The CSU's world-class faculty are critical to the success of our talented and diverse students. The new contract acknowledges the hard work of our faculty to ensure continued student success through the unprecedented global pandemic, while also ensuring fair compensation in challenging economic situations throughout our communities across the state," said CSU Chancellor Joseph I. Castro. “Compensation for our dedicated employees is the top fiscal priority of the trustees in the CSU's 2022-23 budget request, and we are committed to working with the leaders of CFA and the other unions that represent our employees to advocate to our legislative leaders and the governor for fully funding the CSU budget."

“We were able to reach this Tentative Agreement because of the tremendous work and actions of faculty and students on all 23 campuses who communicated their strong and committed voices to the CSU, Board of Trustees and to Chancellor Castro that we must have a fair contract," said Charles Toombs, president of CFA and professor of Africana Studies at San Diego State University. “We all thank Chancellor Castro for acting on this strong faculty commitment to rights, respect, and justice, where faculty working conditions are student learning conditions. Furthermore, CFA always strongly advocates in Sacramento for a budget to meet the growing needs of the CSU, and we look forward to the CSU joining us in our budget advocacy."

The agreement calls for faculty to receive the following:

  • A one-time payment of $3,500, prorated by each faculty member's 2020-21 timebase.
  • A 4% general salary increase (GSI), retroactive to July 1, 2021.
  • Up to a 4% GSI, effective July 1, 2022, dependent on the state budget allocation to the CSU.
  • A 2.65% service salary increase (SSI) during fiscal years 2021-22 and 2023-24 for all eligible faculty, including coaches, counselors and librarians.
  • A 2.65% post-promotion increase (PPI) during fiscal year 2022-23 for eligible faculty, including coaches, counselors and librarians.

A copy of the tentative agreement will be posted on the CSU's Labor and Employee Relations website as soon as it is available.

# # #

About the California State University

The ​California State Universityis the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 56,000 faculty and staff and 477,000 students. Nearly 40 percent CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 132,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter

CSU and CFA Reach Tentative Agreement on Successor Contract
Dismantling-Barriers-for-Emergent-Bilinguals.aspx
  
12/14/2021 2:22 PMSalvador, Christianne12/14/202112/14/2021 2:00 PMCSU faculty are helping English language learners thrive by preparing equity-driven teachers.Teacher PreparationStory

Faculty from Sonoma State, Cal State East Bay and San Diego State are partnering up to break down learning barriers for emergent bilingual students, a group often labeled as English language learners.

The U.S. Department of Education granted $2.9M to fund the Biliteracy and Content Area Integrated Preparation (BCAIP) project, which aims to prepare K-12 teachers to better support students who speak a home language other than English and have the potential to be bilingual.

It is often challenging for emergent bilinguals to learn to read, write and do math in English while they're learning to understand English, putting them at a disadvantage in comparison with their English-fluent peers who can solely focus on the lessons at hand.

And many teachers aren't trained in supporting emergent bilinguals—both in teaching academic content and developing their home language. 

“These students deserve to learn English in order to be academically and economically successful," says Rhianna Casesa, Ph.D., department chair of Literacy Studies and Elementary Education at Sonoma State and BCAIP co-principal investigator. 

“But English should not replace any home languages. Educators should support dual language development while capitalizing on the rich linguistic assets that emergent bilinguals bring to our classrooms," Dr. Casesa says.​

BCAIP unites faculty from Sonoma State and Cal State East Bay to develop a teacher preparation model to ensure students develop language and literacy in both English and their home language simultaneously. The project will also convene family workshops to foster biliteracy for caregivers.

The goal is for all students to effectively absorb academic content and, ultimately, close the achievement gap between emergent bilinguals and their peers.

The number of emergent bilinguals is on the rise nationwide, with California having more than 1​ million emergent bilingual students—the highest share in the country—leading to an immense need for teachers capable of supporting them.

As a national leader in teacher preparation and the single largest producer of teachers in the state, the CSU is dedicated to preparing highly skilled teachers for diverse students at all grade levels.

“What is truly exciting and challenging is to push teachers to value and draw on students' additional language—because biliteracy in itself is beneficial,'' adds Lyn Scott, Ph.D., associate professor in the College of Education and Allied Studies at Cal State East Bay and BCAIP principal investigator.

To understand the project's lasting impact, faculty from San Diego State University will conduct research and evaluation.

In addition, the BCAIP teaching model will be made available to other CSU teacher prep programs as well as other universities across the country by 2026.

“University instructors, mentors of our teacher candidates and the families of emergent bilinguals can learn from each other to support students in classrooms," says Edward G. Lyon, Ph.D., education professor at Sonoma State University and project director of BCAIP.

Dismantling Barriers for Emergent Bilinguals
Social-Mobility-Index-2021.aspx
  
12/15/2021 1:31 PMRuble, Alisia12/13/202112/13/2021 2:20 PMNational rankings highlight the transformative power of a CSU degree to improve students’ lives.Social MobilityStory

​CollegeNET's 2021 “Social Mobility Index" (SMI) once again placed California State University campuses as top performers in economic mobility, highlighting the transformative power of a CSU degree to propel alumni and their families into higher economic strata.

CSU campuses claimed 50% of the top 20 spots in this year's rankings, with six campuses in the top 10.

The campuses included in the top 20 of the SMI are: Los Angeles (2), Long Beach (3), Fresno State (5), San Bernardino (6), Northridge (7), Dominguez Hills (8), Pomona (13), Channel Islands (15), Fullerton (19) and Bakersfield​ (20).

The 10 CSU campuses in the nation's top 20 are collectively providing more than 250,000 students with opportunities to pursue good paying jobs and improve their communities, thanks to high-quality degrees offered at an unparalleled value. 

The annual SMI report measures the extent of a university's impact in providing opportunities for economically disadvantaged students to graduate into well-paying jobs. Methodology is based on factors like cost of attendance, economic background of the student body, graduation rates and early career salaries.

At the CSU, nearly one-third of undergraduates are the first in their family to attend college, and nearly half of CSU students are from underrepresented communities. In addition, half of CSU undergraduates receive the Pell Grant, indicating financial need.

Across the CSU's 23 campuses, there are countless examples of alumni who have bettered their lives with a CSU degree. Cal State Long Beach alumnus Robert Garcia, who was elected mayor of Long Beach in 2014, is one example: “Coming from Peru with no money, very little education, not knowing anyone here, and to be able to work hard, graduate college, and then to become an elected official who has the chance to give back—that's everything," said Garcia in a 2016 interview with CalState.edu. Garcia is part of the CSU alumni community that's more than 4 million strong, powering the economy and improving communities across California. 

A leader in the national conversation around economic mobility, the CSU's Graduation Initiative 2025 is focused on helping students earn degrees in less time—finishing with less debt and entering the workforce earlier. This fall, the CSU is further focusing its initiative on closing equity gaps between students from underrepresented communities and their peers.

students in graduation robes and caps sitting outdoors in stadium seating
CSU Institutions Serve as Engines of Social Mobility, CollegeNET Index Shows
3-2-1...Happy-New-Year.aspx
  
1/4/2022 10:29 AMMcCarthy, Michelle12/13/202112/13/2021 8:00 AMAs the year draws to a close and we reach our final destination of 2022, join us as we revisit just a few of the CSU's recent accomplishments. ImpactStory

3-2-1…Happy New Year!

Take a trip back in time as we revisit 2021 at the CSU.​

There's a saying that goes: “Time flies. It's up to you to be the navigator." Well in 2021, the California State University stayed its course of educational excellence and reached even higher altitudes of social mobility for its students, even in the midst of the ongoing pandemic. The nation's largest, most diverse and most consequential university also welcomed aboard a new captain. As the eighth chancellor of the CSU, Dr. Joseph I. Castro stepped into the role during a time of intermittent turbulence with a fresh vision for the institution. In just 12 months, his strategic and innovative leadership has already made a deep and lasting impact.

As the year draws to a close and we reach our final destination of 2022, join us as we revisit just a few of the CSU's recent accomplishments. The forecast calls for clear skies ahead, so please fasten your seat belts and prepare for landing.


 

JANUARY

New Leadership at the CSU: The year kicked off with burgeoning excitement as the CSU welcomed Chancellor Castro, the university's first Mexican American and native Californian leader. To get to know him better, we asked a few of the people closest to him—family members, civic leaders, CSU faculty, students and alumni—to share a glimpse into the character of the CSU's eighth chancellor. ​

In more great news, despite the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent economic downturn, the educational mission and work of the CSU continued to resonate with donors, supporters and other friends of the university whose generosity assists programmatic excellence throughout the CSU. “In a year unlike any other, the unwavering support of our generous and forward-thinking donors has set records for fundraising across the California State University," Chancellor Castro said.


 

FEBRUARY

The Seismic Zone: If you’ve lived in California for any length of time, you’ve probably experienced an earthquake. For years, scientists have been warning us about “The Big One.” As California braces itself for that future inevitability, we took a look at CSU faculty and students who are working to help prepare the state for earthquakes, large and small.​


 

MARCH

A Triumphant Return: Now more than ever, a college degree is integral to helping people launch fulfilling careers and improve their lives. But outside circumstances sometimes force students to put their college dreams on hold. Returning to school is never easy—fortunately CSU campuses are always eager to welcome students back and help them on the road to success.

With some 130,000 graduates each year, the CSU is home to an amazing roster of notable alumni. Success is often measured as a series of small steps forward, yet every now and then it's helpful to stop and take a look back. A CSU education is not only the launching pad to endless possibilities but a tool that never stops giving. We asked a few remarkable alumni to reflect on how the CSU served as an effective stepping-stone to their successful careers.


 

APRIL

The Race Against the Climate Crisis: To truly save the earth, there needs to be an effort to mitigate climate change by addressing the cause of the problem: greenhouse gas emissions. For Earth Month, we explored how CSU faculty and students are finding ways to curtail emissions and extract carbon from the atmosphere.

The economic impact study released in April quantified the CSU's economic contributions to the state, including the creation of 209,400 jobs annually throughout California. The university contributes to the state's economy with a return of nearly seven dollars for every dollar invested by California.

Student Alberto Smith and aerospace engineer Eric Gever working together to 3D print a face shield.
 

MAY

Cheers to the Class of 4 Million: With the graduation of the Class of 2021, the CSU reached the astounding milestone of 4 million living alumni. While these alumni have spread out across the globe, about 84 percent of them remain in California, with one in 10 of all workers in the state holding a CSU degree. To celebrate, the California State Assembly and Senate each passed a resolution to honor the CSU's milestone and its essential impact on the state.

CSU graduates donned their regalia for one of the CSU's most unique commencement seasons yet, as campuses held in-person and drive-in ceremonies, graduation parades and virtual celebrations.

Graduation day is an exhilarating event. But what happens after the confetti settles? We spoke to CSU alumni to see how a degree impacted their lives post-graduation.


 

JUNE

30 Days of Pride: LGBTQIA awareness is always in season, but during Pride Month in June, there's a heightened sense of visibility and community. We highlighted CSU faculty members, students, alumni and staff who are committed to breaking down closet doors year-round.

The CSU received spectacular news as California Governor Gavin Newsom signed the state budget, which restored funds that were previously cut. Funding will include support for student mental health services and rapid rehousing for houseless and housing insecure students. Chancellor Castro called the news “bold and visionary."


 

JULY

The Secret to Their CSUCCESS: In July, the CSU announced the first phase of its largest-ever device distribution that provided iPad Airs for more than 22,700 first-year and new transfer students at eight campuses. The CSUCCESS Initiative aims to enhance equity and student achievement for CSU students.

The CSU Chancellor's Office also welcomed Sylvia A. Alva, Ph.D.​, in July when she was appointed executive vice chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs of the California State University. Dr. Alva is a first-generation college graduate and a product of the CSU, having earned a bachelor's degree in psychology from California State University, Los Angeles.


 

AUGUST

First in Line: At the CSU, nearly one-third of undergraduates are the first in their family to attend college. While this is an incredible accomplishment, those first days on campus can stir up feelings of apprehension. We spoke to CSU community members—including Chancellor Castro—who accepted the challenge and transformed from first-generation students to remarkable leaders who pay it forward.

In August, the CSU announced its partnership with Apple and California Governor Gavin Newsom to establish a Global Hispanic Serving Institution Equity Innovation Hub​ that will be housed on the California State University, Northridge campus. The hub will work to transform HSIs throughout the CSU and nation to increase student success and equip Latinx and other historically underserved students with skills for high-demand careers in STEM.


 

SEPTEMBER

¡Si Se Puede!: To celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month, we recognized just 30 of the notable Latinx students, staff, faculty and alumni from across the CSU who have served or continue to serve their campuses and communities.

In his first “State of the CSU" address, Chancellor Joseph I. Castro explored how the lessons of the past 18 months have issued a calling for the CSU to be an even more vital and equitable institution.


 

OCTOBER

Move-in Day 2021: “Welcome back!" had a new ring to it this year. As we emerge from the global health crisis, CSU campuses have returned to their natural hustle and bustle. In the grand tradition of “back to school," students packed up their school supplies, said “see you soon" to their families and headed to campus. And we are elated to have them back.

In October, the CSU announced it will not make future fossil fuel investments in university investment portfolios and funds. Chancellor Castro said, “Consistent with our values, it is an appropriate time to start to transition away from these types of investments, both to further demonstrate our commitment to a sustainable CSU but also to ensure strong future returns on the funds invested by the university."​

In addition, the hard work to improve student success across all 23 CSU campuses continues to pay off, as graduation rates have risen to all-time highs for both first-time and transfer students, despite the turbulence associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. A record 132,167 degrees were conferred by CSU campuses in 2020-21—nearly 25,000 more than prior to the 2015 launch of the university-wide Graduation Initiative 2025.


 

NOVEMBER

Serving Those Who Served: The CSU's commitment to student success extends to all students, especially those who serve or have served our country. For Veterans Day, we took a look at a few of the resources available to military-connected students and those who are thinking about attending the CSU.

Drought is one of California's most persistent issues. As climate change drives temperatures higher and water levels lower, a critical strain is being placed on one of our most essential resources. We explored how CSU faculty, students and alumni are fervently working on solutions to mitigate the damage.


 

DECEMBER

'Tis the Season: The season of giving is upon us. In the spirit of the holidays, CSU campuses enlisted faculty, staff and students to give back​ to their communities through food drives, gift donations, volunteer days and more.

Venture further back to past years and see what the CSU accomplished in a mere 365 days.​




3-2-1...Happy New Year
10-top-tips-cal-state-apply-2021.aspx
  
12/9/2021 3:31 PMKelly, Hazel12/9/202112/9/2021 11:45 AMGet ready to apply to the California State University with these top tips.ApplyStory

​​Ready to start your higher education journey?

Watch this short video for the top 10 tips for completing your application in the CalState Apply portal.


​​
1. Don't wait. Start your application today. Avoid the unnecessary stress of waiting until the last minute.

2. Use a current email address. This is the main method of communication throughout the application process.

3. Check the dates and deadlines​ for each CSU campus that you are interested in applying to. Dates can change.

4. Prepare. Review the application guides and checklists available on the CalSate Apply website before you start. (Find an application checklist for freshmen and transfer students. Find an application guide for freshmen and transfer students.)

5. Gather your course info before you start. High school coursework and/or college coursework info will be needed for the application.

6. Don't rush. Start as soon as possible and take your time. Complete your extended profile correctly. Read the questions and use the help menu if you need assistance.

7. Ask for help.  Reach out for assistance with your high school counselor, community college counselor or use Apply Support – call, email or chat.

8. Review. It's a good idea to review your application with a family member or counselor before you submit it​. This is why it's important to plan ahead and start early.

9. Fee waivers may be available. CalState Apply automatically reviews undergraduate student applicants to determine if they are eligible for an application fee waiver. If you are eligible, it will allow you to apply for up to four campuses with no cost.

10. Apply for financial aid. The FAFSA and Dream Act applications are open and available for you to complete now. The FAFSA will allow you to apply for federal, state and institutional aid, while the California Dream Act application is for those students who do not have a social security number and will allow them to apply for state and institutional aid.


Get started today at Calstate.edu/Apply​


As the largest university system in the U.S., the California State University provides all individuals interested in furthering their education access to a valuable, life-changing college degree. Here are just 10 reasons to apply to the CSU.

two young women sitting outside on grass with laptops, fall leaves in the background
10 Top Tips for Cal State Apply
The-Spirit-of-Giving.aspx
  
12/6/2021 8:53 AMBarrie, Matthew12/6/202112/6/2021 2:05 PMDuring this festive time of year, the CSU is taking the opportunity to give back to its community.ImpactStory

​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​The season of giving is upon us. Throughout the year, the CSU works to support students in need with food pantries, clothing closets and other basic needs programs. But in the spirit of the holidays, CSU campuses and the Chancellor's Office ​are enlisting faculty, staff and students to give back to the outside community through food drives, gift donations, volunteer days and more.

Lend a Hand

For a number of campuses, service events gave campus community members a chance to get more hands-on in their giving back.

The Giving Tree, part of the Warriors Giving Back program at Stanislaus State, invited the campus community to “adopt” and provide a special gift for local elementary school children. The campus collected wish list items from the kids, which were then put on tags and hung on a tree in the University Student Center. Community members could then select a tag and purchase the gift from the campus’s Amazon Wish List.

A CSUCI student volunteer helps a woman at the 2015 Holiday Street Store.

A CSUCI student volunteer helps​​ a woman at the 2015 Holiday Street Store.​

There was ​no shortage of w​ays to give back at CSU Channel Islands this year. Among other events, Student Academic Success and Equity Initiatives (SASEI) facilitated a SASEI SERVES volunteer day at a Rescue Food Sorting event, while the Center for Community Engagement will hold its Holiday Street Store with Westminster Free Clinic. The center collects donated items like clothing, shoes and toys, which are then given away in a free pop-up shopping experience for community members in need.

During the annual Chico State Staff Council Joy of Giving program, groups across the campus, from academic departments to athletic teams, are encouraged to “adopt” a local family and provide a selection of clothing and gifts. Last year, the campus supported 41 families and 94 children identified by Butte County Social Services. In years past, drop-off day has involved a celebration at the University Farm Pavilion, though that piece of the tradition was put on hold in 2020. This year, the party will return with a live band and steaming beverages.

“Over the last 29 years, the Joy of Giving program has raised over $100,000 for grocery gift cards for each family participating in our program,” says Tawnie Peterson, Staff Council chair. “We have gifted over 2,000 families in our community a holiday to remember, meeting the families’ immediate needs and granting children’s wishes, while at the same time bringing our campus together with the community.”

Cadets at Cal Maritime are helping keep mariners warm this holiday season with Knitting for Mariners. On Fridays leading up to November 13, a group gathered to knit hats, scarves and mittens that were then donated to the International Maritime Center.

Coordinated by the Forever Humboldt Association, the Winter Wishes program at Humboldt State has involved the HSU community in purchasing toys and gifts for local children for more than 20 years. Last year, alumni, staff, faculty and students gifted more than $12,000 worth through the program’s nonprofit partners.

​ ​ Students volunteer for the Operation Gobble Gobble Turkey Distribution at Cal Poly Pomona.

Students volunteer for the Operation Gobble Gobble turkey distribution at Cal Poly Pomona on November 10, 2021​.

​"W​inter Wishes is such a special program because it allows kids to feel heard and seen during the holidays,” says Stephanie Lane, director of Alumni Relations and Winter Wishes coordinator. “They ask for specific gifts, and sponsors go shopping for exactly what they asked for. It’s personalized, and the sponsors enjoy knowing that they are supporting a specific child in our community."

On November 10, Cal Poly Pomona served as a distribution site for L.A. County Board Supervisor and CPP alumna Hilda Solis’ turkey distribution, ​​Operation Gobble Gobble. Over the course of several hours, campus volunteers gave out Thanksgiving meals to community-based organizations as part of her effort to distribute 1,400 turkeys.

In honor of their late son, Sacramento State staff member Don Nahhas and his wife, Dawn, created the nonprofit Josh’s Heart to care for the unhoused, and in November, they brought a service event to the campus’s Alumni Center. The community filled 10​​0 Winter Blessing Backpacks for the unhoused with toiletries, fleece blankets, food and more, which were then distributed locally. Additionally, Sacramento State students volunteered with Governor Gavin Newsom and First Partner Jennifer Siebel Newsom to assemble Thanksgiving meals​ at River City Food Bank.

Drive for Good

Campuses also harnessed the generosity of their communities by collecting food, toys, financial donations and more to give to local nonprofits.

San Diego State’s annual Aztecs Rock Hunger food drive—a partnership between Associated Students and Jacobs & Cushman San Diego Food Bank—combats food insecurity on campus and within the local community. This holiday season, the campus community participated through both fundraising and food donations. Since 2010, the program has provided more than 3.6 million pounds of food—and this year, the coordinators aimed to raise 619,000 pounds in honor of the region’s 619 area code.

“This campaign is super special because it’s always been a community-based effort that directly touches our local population—our fellow students, friends, families and neighbors,” A.S. Vice President of Financial Affairs Austin Barber says in a press release.

Santa Claus visits a group of preschoolers to give out the gifts donated during CSUDH's 2020 Totes for Tots drive.

Santa Claus visits a group of preschoolers to give out the gifts donated during CSUDH's 2020 Totes for Tots drive.​​

For the ​fifth time, the Center for Service Learning, Internships and Community Engagement at CSU Dominguez Hills organized a Totes for Tots drive to benefit Compton preschoolers. Members of the campus’s early education organization CSUDH Jumpstart then gift the donated toys to more than 200 children during holiday celebrations where Santa makes an appearance.

“Putting together small ​details like decorating, bringing Santa and participating in the toy drive collection warms my heart during the holiday season,” says Totes for Tots coordinator and former student volunteer Natalie Gomez. “Getting to see firsthand the many tiny faces filled with excitement and happiness as they pick and receive their gift is the cherry on top of the entire event.”

Several organizations at CSU Bakersfield mobilized to supply gifts for the community. The Athletics Student-Athlete Advisory Committee held its sixth annual toy drive for the Ronald McDonald House and Toys for Tots while the Student Recreation Center teamed up with the nonprofit CASA of Kern County for its annual Giving Tree Teen Toy Drive. Participating campus community members could select names from the Giving Tree and fulfill their holiday wish lists.

The EPIC Office at Cal State LA and United American Indian Involvement, Inc., (UAII) gave the campus an opportunity to give back to their communities through a food drive and service day. Students, faculty and staff were invited to donate canned goods for UAII’s food giveaway. They could then volunteer to participate in the giveaway during the Cal State LA Gives Back! service event on November 15.

“Now more than ever, it is important for us to emphasize our interconnection through service and engagement,” says Taffany Lim, executive director of the Center for Engagement, Service, and the Public Good. “We are grateful for this partnership with United American Indian Involvement, Inc., and we are so proud of our students who are volunteering their time to give back to the community.”

While kicking off the holiday season with a cookie decorating pa​rty, the Womxn’s Collective Council, Sociology Student Association and Cambodian Student Society at Cal State Long Beach held a food drive. Members of the council then matched the resulting donations and gave them to the Food Bank of Southern California.

Groups at San José State are likewise doing their part to give back. The Lurie College of Education collected socks for the Bill Wilson Center and supported the nonprofit Family Giving Tree, which coordinates a Holiday Wish Drive to gather gifts for Bay-area children. Meanwhile, the César E. Chávez Community Action Center​ hosted a holiday festival for residents of a local transitional housing neighborhood, and the Charles W. Davidson College of Engineering participated in a toy drive and fundraising effort for the Sacred Heart Community Center.

In addition, CSUN’s volunteer program United We Serve collected new socks, underwear and board games for the nonprofit Meet Every Need with Dignity; San Francisco State Dining Services collected non-perishable foods for the San Francisco-Marin Food Bank; and the Jack H. Brown College of Business and Public Administration at Cal State San Bernardino is holding its own Christmas toy drive for the More Hope Project mutual aid group​.

Lastly, the CSU Office of the Chancellor is organizing its own programs to give back. Employees can help feed local families through the Food Finders food drive, or donate new books, toys and sports gear as part of the Long Beach Fire Department’s Spark of Love toy drive.

If you’d like to give back to the CSU, visit the Give to the CSU webpage.

Staff Council members sort donated gifts for Chico State's 2020 Joy of Giving program.
The Spirit of Giving
call-to-action.aspx
  
11/29/2021 7:58 AMRawls, Aaron11/29/202111/29/2021 10:05 AMThe CSU is equipping teams across the state to respond when disaster strikes.CommunityStory
Port of Los Angeles

Call to Action

The CSU is equipping teams across the state to respond when disaster strikes.

For emergency response personnel, the hope is they’ll never need to put their skills to use. But in the case of an emergency, it’s their training that saves lives and heals communities. Across the CSU, programs are in place to prepare both students and working professionals to respond to those crises.

Volunteer divers at Humboldt State gear up for the Public Safety Diver certification course.

Safety Deep Dive

Since the 1990s, Humboldt County—a region with bodies of water ranging from the ocean and the bay to lakes and rivers—has gone without an official underwater search and rescue team. Until recently, those missions were conducted by volunteer citizen divers at great personal risk.

To ensure the region has its own trained and certified search and rescue dive team, Humboldt State University and Humboldt Bay Fire are working together to launch a new Public Safety Dive Training program.

“There's a need for first responders, whether they're members of fire departments, sheriff's deputies or volunteers working for dive search and recovery teams, to have some sort of formal training in public safety diving so they can do it safely,” says Rich Alvarez, HSU lecturer and diving safety officer. “It's a very technical, very high-risk thing to go out and do. … Knowing a location where people can get the training is going to hopefully be helpful not only to Humboldt County, but surrounding counties and regions with a need to train search and recovery divers.”

A diver-in-training practices body recovery at the Humboldt State pool by searching for a submerged mannequin while wearing a black-out mask to simulate zero visibility.

The plans for the training program came after volunteer members of what is now the Humboldt Bay Fire Dive Rescue and Recovery Team—including Alvarez, Lecturer and Boating Safety Officer Steve Monk, Lecturer Hanna Johnston and Scuba Instructor Leah Stamper—conducted a search mission following the death of kayaker Nicholas Brunner in 2020. The Brunner family organized a Go Fund Me campaign to establish an official underwater recovery team and created the Nicolas Brunner Memorial Dive Award to help students complete their dive training.

“We were able to recover his body and bring closure to the family,” Alvarez says. “And the family took it upon themselves to fundraise—which has been the big hurdle for creating this training—to pay for the training and to start to get the team off the ground.”

In August 2021, the HSU volunteers, along with two more campus scuba instructors, completed the formal Public Safety Diver certification course, with Alvarez and Monk also earning their instructor rating. With two instructors now able to train others in public safety diving, the campus hopes to begin offering the 50-hour certification course to HSU students, first responders and other members of the public who are affiliated with formal dive recovery teams as early as next summer.

The public safety diving training goes beyond a general scuba diving certification to prepare divers for the heightened risks and challenges associated with underwater recovery missions.

An instructor from Public Safety Dive Training provides feedback on proper lifting techniques when recovering a body using the yellow body bag and the floating lift bag.​

“Having formal training available increases the safety factor for the divers out there,” Alvarez says. “It's usually going to be in water that's contaminated, and there's potential for diving around submerged vehicles or next to docks and piers.”

“The training itself focuses heavily on how to conduct searches: how to be methodical if we're looking for evidence, how to safeguard that evidence and make it usable in court,” he continues. “Then if we're looking for a drowning victim, the training will include how to recover them and … how to do it respectfully.”

The EMT class practices putting an oxygen mask on a simulation mannequin.

Driving the EMT Workforce

If the COVID-19 pandemic has made one thing clear, it’s how integral emergency and medical personnel are amidst a crisis. With an eye toward training local essential workers, the Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) course at California State University, Dominguez Hills provides the classroom teaching and hands-on learning experiences needed to prepare students to take the EMT certification exam and serve their communities in that capacity.

“Working as an EMT is an option for people who may not have a college degree,” says CSUDH Director of Extension Programs Elisabeth Legge. “Students can take this class and immediately get employment and have so many upward opportunities. … They're able to work in Los Angeles County, and they can also apply to work in other counties in California. Then there are also some options for them to use their license or their certification out of state as well. There are a lot of career opportunities for students going forward from our program.”

A CSUDH EMT teaching assistant helps students practice spinal immobilization using a long backboard.

The semester-long course, which is approved by Los Angeles County Emergency Management Services, is open to CSUDH students and the public. Students learn to provide patient care and use the emergency equipment while working with the program’s fully supplied ambulance and during a 24- to 36-hour ambulance ride-along.

CSUDH launched the course with the support of local ambulance company MedReach, which was looking to furnish the pipeline of EMTs working in the area. The company donated the ambulance and helped the campus acquire supplies. The first session ran in fall 2019, after which all the students passed their certification exams.

​​

Students conduct a simulated medical patient assessment on a teaching assistant who is acting as a patient experiencing difficulty breathing.

However, the program was put on hold during the pandemic, which allowed the CSUDH team to design a hybrid format with online and in-person components. The program is planned to re-launch in February 2022.

“We think that's going to broaden appeal because the flexibility is so important to so many of our students,” Legge says. “It's also a great opportunity for someone who's working through college because of the flexible schedules working as an EMT provides.”

A team of anthropology experts and students work to identify human remains consumed by the Camp Fire in Paradise, California.

A Look at Forensics

Since its inception in 1974, the Human Identification Lab (HIL) in California State University, Chico’s Department of Anthropology has served an integral role in cases of missing persons, criminal investigations and mass fatality events. Currently working with 46 counties across California, the lab’s faculty team participates in recovery missions, helps identify recovered human remains and develops search and rescue methodologies. But it is also key to ensuring the state’s current and future professionals are effectively trained in the field.

“Across the country, we have an ever-increasing need for professionals who work in forensic science because of the value it brings to some of the hardest types of investigations,” says Colleen Milligan, Ph.D., HIL co-director and Department of Anthropology chair. “The remains that we have as casework tend to be some of the hardest conditions for getting identified. … So anytime you increase the forensic science workforce and increase the capabilities of the state to understand the advances in technology and methodology, you also reduce the number of unidentified victims, the number of unclaimed victims and the number of crimes that go unsolved and become cold cases.”

Professor Ashley Kendell, left, and Professor Emeritus P. Willey work in the Anthropology Department’s Human Identification Laboratory at Chico State​.

As certified instructors for California’s Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST), the lab faculty assist in two-week homicide investigation courses across the state, largely for law enforcement and medical legal professionals.

But they also train both undergraduate and graduate students in forensic science. For undergraduates, the Certificate in Forensic Science covers classroom learning in topics like biological sciences and the legal system. Students then get hands-on experience, usually reserved for when they enter the workforce, through a required internship. The program has placed students in the HIL, coroner offices, medical examiners offices, crime labs and law offices. “We craft their curriculum and training based on their interests and future career path goals,” says Ashley Kendell, Ph.D., Certificate in Forensic Science coordinator.

“A lot of times you're introduced to forensic science in a classroom environment, and you may have labs as part of a class, but everything is simulated,” Dr. Milligan adds. “When undergrads go through some of our coursework … we work real case examples into the curriculum, which gives them an idea of what this actually looks like. We use the actual crime scene materials and equipment they would encounter should they be hired for a crime scene position.”

Professor Colleen Milligan, center, points out details of a plastic skeleton to students while teaching her Survey Forensic Science class.​

In addition, graduate students in forensics work on live cases in the HIL and deploy with the lab’s recovery teams. “They're stepping into investigations with us, and that is immensely valuable for their professional growth,” Milligan says.

Lastly, the HIL has expanded its role in helping the state respond to mass fatality events like wildfires since it proved an invaluable state resource for victim recovery following the 2018 Camp Fire. Since then, they’ve worked with the California Office of Emergency Services to discern how California can improve its response to future events and began conducting training for coroners and search and rescue groups.

“Butte County’s trust in our advice on how to respond to future fatalities has allowed us to improve collaborative responses,” Dr. Kendell says. “Integrating multiple agencies together improves efficiency, not only of recovery, but of the number of identifications that are made. … The closure we can bring for families and the information we can provide is unique.”

Milligan notes improvement was already seen during the 2020 North Complex Fire, as victims were recovered more quickly and were more likely to be​ identified within 24 hours. “That helps families, that helps the community and that helps resources come in to begin cleanup,” she says.

A wildland firefighting crew walks amid wildfire flames.

Focus on the Flames

In the past few years, California has seen some of its largest and most destructive wildfires, burning millions of acres of land. Predictions only expect the wildfire season to get longer and worse. The Bachelor of Science in Wildfire Science and the Urban Interface program at California State University San Marcos is helping communities respond to that problem, especially where fires burn at the intersection of wild land and urban landscapes.

“This represents a massive opportunity for us as a state to be able to provide the tools communities, fire departments and first responders need to address this issue,” says Matt Rahn, Ph.D., program director and research faculty. “It's not going away, and it's only getting worse.”

Dr. Matt Rahn collects data in the field during a wildland-urban interface fire to study smoke levels, hazardous particles it's emitting and potential occupational exposures for firefighters. The results are compared to those simulated in a lab, pictured below.

The flexible, online program is designed as a completion degree for firefighters and first responders who have already gone through the fire academies and trainings to help them understand the challenges this new age of wildfire poses. The goal is to prepare the next generation to not only respond to wildfires, but prevent them.

“It took us 150 years of bad decision-making to get to where we are today in California,” Dr. Rahn says. “It is not going to take five years or one legislative cycle to fix this. It's going to take us 50 or 100 years to fix this. That means we need to dedicate to that workforce that quality of employee and expert to be able to understand and address this and come up with the novel solutions we haven't even thought of yet.”

Course topics include health and safety, fire ecology and community resilience, technology, law and economics, mental and behavioral health, and nutrition and hydration. There is also a mandatory research component that allows students to participate in ongoing fire research at CSUSM or conduct a study that could benefit their own department.

Dr. Rahn's team performs research at the National Institute of Standards and Technology lab to better understand occupational exposures experienced by firefighters during wildland-urban interface fires. They collected vegetation from across the U.S., burned it with urban materials to simulate these​ fires and analyzed the effects on the smoke.

But the program has also drawn professionals who work for cities, utility companies, consulting firms, county planning departments, environmental organizations and other municipalities.

“Whether you're working on evacuation planning or community resilience, or you're working in a planning department on how to design a community that may be in that wild land-urban interface, a lot of the principles we teach in this program apply to that,” Rahn says. “There are a lot of folks coming out of municipalities because they’re recognizing this is now [having] billions of dollars of economic impact annually on our communities just in California alone, and thousands of homes are burning annually in the United States. [They] are now looking at their cities and saying, ‘We need to plan for this.’”


Learn more about how the CSU is studying fire and preparing the next generation of crisis responders.

Call to Action
21-CSU-Campuses-Honored-as-Equity-Champions-of-Higher-Education.aspx
  
11/29/2021 8:09 AMSalvador, Christianne11/29/202111/29/2021 8:00 AMThe awards are a testament to the success of the Associate Degree for Transfer (ADT) program. Transfer StudentStory

​​​Twenty-one California State University campuses were named 2021 Champions of Higher Education for their commitment to ensuring community college students have a strong pathway into the CSU.

The announcements were made at The Campaign for College Opportunity's annual Champions of Higher Education and Equity Champions for Excellence in Transfer awards ceremony in November 2021.

The Campaign for College Opportunity is a nonprofit organization devoted to ensuring that all Californians have an equal opportunity to attend and succeed in college.

“This year, we worked with national experts to create an equity framework that would analyze how each of our campuses are doing in terms of transfer, with specific attention to closing gaps for Black and Latinx students," said Michele Siqueiros, president of The Campaign for College Opportunity.

“We are celebrating the campuses that have been very intentional at ensuring that transfer works for students who are typically underrepresented in the [transfer] pathways."

The awards are a testament to the success of the Associate Degree for Transfer (ADT) program. CSU campuses were recognized in three categories:


Excellence in Transfer

For leading the state and working with intentionality to support community college students through the ADT.

  • Fresno
  • Fullerton
  • Long Beach
  • Pomona

Excellence in Transfer – Black and Latinx Students

For leading the state and working with intentionality to support Black and Latinx students through the ADT.

  • East Bay
  • Fresno
  • San Bernardino
  • San Marcos
  • San José

Excellence in Transfer – Latinx Students

For leading the state and working with intentionality to support Latinx students through the ADT.

  • Bakersfield
  • Channel Islands
  • Chico
  • Dominguez Hills
  • Fullerton
  • Humboldt
  • Long Beach
  • Los Angeles
  • Monterey Bay
  • Northridge
  • Pomona
  • Sacramento
  • San Diego
  • San Francisco
  • Sonoma
  • Stanislaus

Since 2012, ADT has made it easier for California Community Colleges (CCC) students to transfer to the CSU. The CSU-CCC joint program awards associate degrees and guarantees a CSU campus admission to community college students who earn at least 60 of the 120 units needed for a bachelor's degree in a specific major.

For many students, especially first-generation and underrepresented minorities who lack guidance on navigating college, ADT provides them with a clearly defined pathway to a bachelor's degree.

Students transferring with an ADT earn their degree in less time than their peers – 55 percent of ADT students graduate within two years, compared to 40 percent for those who transferred without an ADT.

Today, nearly 40 percent of the CSU's undergraduate student population transferred from California Community Colleges.

The CSU is committed to increasing additional opportunities for transfer students and supported legislation recently signed by Governor Newsom that will provide an even smoother path to the CSU. Assembly Bill 928, the Student Transfer Achievement Reform Act of 2021, creates a single general education (GE) pathway for students to transfer from a California Community College to the CSU. It also opens opportunities for students to enroll in more major preparation course in STEM and business – as well as allows for the development of more STEM ADT pathways to high unit fields like engineering, computer science, chemistry, biology, physics and business.

21 CSU Campuses Honored as Equity Champions of Higher Education
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Call to Action
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11/29/202111/29/2021 8:00 AMThe awards are a testament to the success of the Associate Degree for Transfer (ADT) program. Transfer StudentStory
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