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Stephen-Perez-Appointed-Interim-President-of-San-Jose-State-University.aspx
  
11/22/2021 10:02 AMSalvador, Christianne11/22/202111/22/2021 10:00 AMPerez will assume the leadership of the campus on January 3, 2022 after the departure of current SJSU president Dr. Mary A. Papazian.LeadershipPress Release

​​​California State University (CSU) Chancellor Joseph I. Castro has appointed Stephen Perez, Ph.D., to serve as interim president of San José State University (SJSU). Perez currently serves as provost and vice president of Academic Affairs and professor of economics at Sacramento State. Perez will assume the leadership of the campus on January 3, 2022 after the departure of current SJSU president Dr. Mary A. Papazian, who is resigning from the presidency effective December 21, 2021. Current SJSU provost and senior vice president for Academic Affairs Vincent J. Del Casino Jr., will be the executive in charge on campus during the brief transition upon Papazian's departure.

“Dr. Perez is a bold leader with a long-standing commitment to improving student achievement demonstrated through his many years of service at Sacramento State," said Castro. “His passion for increasing opportunity for all students and his track record of building collaborative relationships with students, faculty and staff will ensure that SJSU continues on its upward trajectory during this time of transition."

In his role as provost and vice president of Academic Affairs, Perez provides leadership and support for the Division of Academic Affairs including, faculty and staff in all colleges, the University Library, and for several offices that support students, faculty and staff, and the Sacramento region. Additionally, Perez has taught macroeconomics at all levels as well as econometrics, sports economics, labor economics and mathematics for economists.

“From providing a transformational education to tens of thousands of students to serving as a cultural hub and an incubator for innovation, SJSU is driving the Silicon Valley and makes an impact that reverberates throughout the state and the world," said Perez. “I enthusiastically welcome and appreciate the opportunity to work collaboratively with the dedicated students, faculty, staff, president's cabinet and community to further increase the achievement of our talented and diverse students."

Perez joined Sacramento State as an assistant professor in the Department of Economics in 2001. Over his two decades of service to the university he has also served as associate professor, professor, assistant to the president for special projects, faculty athletics representative and interim provost before being appointed to his current role in the fall of 2019. His previous experience includes service as a member of the faculty at Washington State University and Virginia Commonwealth University.

Perez earned a bachelor's degree in economics from the University of California, San Diego and his master's and Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Davis.

The duration of Perez's interim appointment is expected to last for approximately one year.  CSU Trustees will soon begin a national search for a permanent president to lead the campus.

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About the California State University
The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 56,000 faculty and staff and 477,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity, and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards nearly than 132,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Stephen Perez Appointed Interim President of San José State University
CSUCCESS-PhaseTwo-Announcement-2021-22.aspx
  
11/17/2021 12:56 PMKelly, Hazel11/17/202111/17/2021 1:00 PMMore than half of CSU's campuses now participate in groundbreaking technology distribution program, bridging digital equity for students across California.Student SuccessPress Release

​The California State University (CSU) today announced the launch of the second phase of CSUCCESS (California State University Connectivity Contributing to Equity and Student Success), adding more campuses along with a new Wi-Fi connectivity package to its free technology distribution program designed to enhance student achievement and create more equitable opportunities.

Building on a successful fall 2021 launch, Phase Two of CSUCCESS will add six additional campuses to the program—Dominguez Hills, Fullerton, Long Beach, Pomona, San Bernardino and Sonoma—marking a total of 14 of the CSU's 23 institutions now in participation. (Phase One campuses include Bakersfield, Channel Islands, Fresno, Humboldt, Los Angeles, Maritime Academy, Northridge and San Marcos.)

Incoming first-year and new transfer students for the spring 2022 term at the 14 participating campuses are eligible to receive a technology bundle that includes a new iPad Air, Apple Pencil and Apple Smart Keyboard Folio upon request. In addition, students may request a free Wi-Fi hotspot device, which includes an unlimited data plan from one of two major national carriers, made available to the university at a significantly discounted cost. Students will be provided with this iPad bundle for the entirety of their undergraduate experience at the CSU.

“I'm excited to expand this important program to even more incoming students this spring to help bridge the digital divide and establish a technological foundation for achievement from day one of their college journey," said CSU Chancellor Joseph I. Castro. “Phase One of CSUCCESS was well-received by our students and the program shows tremendous promise in advancing our goals of student success and educational equity."

CSUCCESS is the largest device distribution program of its kind coming from the largest and most diverse system of four-year higher education in the country. During Phase One, more than 22,700 students received devices. Nearly half of all CSU undergraduates receive Pell Grants—demonstrating financial need—and nearly one-third are the first in their family to pursue a bachelor's degree.

Many students throughout the state reported difficulties accessing quality devices and reliable internet during the pandemic. CSU campuses stepped up by offering mobile hot spots and short-term loaner laptops and adding Wi-Fi to parking lots to help overcome some of these obstacles. The CSUCCESS initiative builds on these efforts to address the issue at scale, making more high-quality devices available to more students, while leveraging the size of the CSU to secure strong partnerships with major national vendors like Apple, AT&T and T-Mobile. Future phases of the program could offer an expanded suite of technology to additional campuses and students.

“Addressing the digital divide is a defining part of the CSU and CSSA's shared commitment to eradicating equity gaps and CSUCCESS represents the best of our partnership," said Cal State Student Association (CSSA) President Isaac Alferos. “We are excited to see more campuses joining our initiative and will continue to work until every student has access to reliable technology."

“The CSUCCESS program is one way for us to remove barriers to success for our diverse and talented students so they feel supported and empowered to focus on their academics," said Chancellor Castro. “Reliable, modern technology builds a foundation for achievement and can transform opportunities for our students statewide."

The program is an important component in the CSU's efforts to recover from the pandemic and improve student success while eliminating opportunity and achievement gaps as part of Graduation Initiative 2025.

Visit the CSUCCESS website for additional information about the program. 


About the California State University

The California State Universityis the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 56,000 faculty and staff and 477​,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 132,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter

 



man wearing protective face covering hands a stack of tech devices to a student standing at a bookstore counter
14 CSU Campuses to Provide Incoming Spring 2022 Students with Free Computing Devices through CSUCCESS
On-The-Seas-Of-Success.aspx
  
11/15/2021 8:07 AMRawls, Aaron11/15/202111/15/2021 3:45 PMLearn how innovative programs at CSU campuses help increase gender equity in traditionally male-dominated fields.Student SuccessStory
The Faults on our Earth

ON THE SEAS OF SUCCESS

How innovative programs at CSU campuses help increase gender equity in traditionally male-dominated fields.


 

With a track record of more than 90% of its graduates landing jobs within months of graduation, the California State University Maritime Academy is a unique, specialized CSU campus producing the maritime leaders of the future.

Located in Vallejo, California, on the scenic San Pablo Bay, Cal Maritime is one of only seven degree-granting maritime academies in the United States—and the only one on the West Coast. More than 800 students are enrolled in the Cal Maritime Corps of Cadets, pursuing degree programs in marine transportation, marine engineering technology, international business and logistics, mechanical engineering, oceanography, global studies and maritime affairs, and facilities engineering technology. These degrees open doors for graduates to pursue lucrative positions within the industry while positioning them for leadership roles in their field.

Since joining the California State University in 1996, Cal Maritime has highest employment rate in the CSU system. On average, Cal Maritime's graduates receive several offers with starting salaries well above the national average.

Cal Maritime President Thomas A. Cropper (left) with alumna Kate McCue and Chancellor Emeritus Timothy P. White in 2019. Courtesy of Cal Maritime ​

One of the university's more visible alums, Kate McCue ('00), became the first-ever American woman to captain a mega cruise ship when she took the helm of the Celebrity Summit in 2015 and now commands the Celebrity Edge—one of the cruise liner's newest ships. In fact, with McCue at the helm, the Edge recently made headlines as the first cruise ship sailing with guests from a U.S. port after the pandemic shutdown of 2020.

McCue visited the Cal Maritime campus in May 2019 with Lisa Lutoff-Perlo, president & CEO of Celebrity Cruises, who gave a commencement address emphasizing the importance of growing diversity in the maritime industry—giving a shout-out to McCue in her speech. And during the university's 2021 commencement, both student speakers were women: Marina Bartels, a Marine Transportation major, and Nicole Light Densberger, who earned an MSTEM (Masters in Transportation and Engineering Management).​

Similar to the maritime industry, maritime academies have historically been challenged in achieving ethnic and gender diversity within their student bodies and faculties. As a public university in California, Cal Maritime is working to double minority representation on campus through active alumni recruiting efforts to identify candidates for enrollment and programs that support and celebrate diverse populations.

In addition, Cal Maritime hosts an annual Women in Maritime Leadership Conference offering opportunities for leadership development and networking for women in maritime and related fields. Captain McCue was keynote speaker for the March 2021 event, held virtually.

 
 
 
 
Cal Maritime ca​dets in several majors have an opportunity to embark on a training cruise aboard the university's Training Ship Golden Bear.

[Learn about more innovative CSU programs advancing gender diversity below]​
 

WOMEN LEAD IN CYBERSECURITY

Cal State San Bernardino readies women for a variety of leadership roles in a flourishing industry.

Discover How

CAREER-READY ENGINEERS

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo's Women in Engineering Program prepares students for lucrative careers in engineering.

Learn More
 
 
ALUMNA TURNED MARITIME INSTRUCTOR

Cal Maritime alumna Flora van der Schoot (marine transportation '20) served as Cadet Second Mate on the unversity's Training Ship Golden Bear during a 2019 training cruise.


​ ​

On The Seas Of Success
CSU-CARES-Provides-Financial-Relief-for-Students-Experiencing-Hardships-Due-to-COVID-19.aspx
  
11/10/2021 10:44 AMMcCarthy, Michelle11/10/202111/10/2021 8:00 AMCSU CARES Provides Financial Relief for Students Experiencing Hardships Due to COVID-19Story

​​​​​​​​​​​​​Last month, Elijah Marshall found himself in a tough spot with nowhere to turn. The aerospace engineering student at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona was struggling financially and didn't know how he was going to stay afloat during the final months of the semester. That is, until he received funding through the CSU CARES program, which offers emergency grants to ​students experiencing hardships directly related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Expenses might include food, housing, course materials, technology, health care and childcare.

“When I first started attending college about 10 years ago, my family was homeless," Marshall recalls. “I cannot count the amount of times we were evicted, the number of friends I lived with or the places I've slept. While I'm no longer homeless, I still lack the financial stability and support of my family and have struggled to make it this far. That relief fund absolutely saved me in my time of need."

And Marshall isn't alone. Enrolled CSU undergraduate, graduate and professional students who are not attending a completely online program may receive emergency grants through the Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund (HEERF) authorized by Congress and supplemented with CSU campus funds. The amount varies by campus and by student, depending on campus resources and student circumstances.

To date, CSU campuses have granted students more than $952,000,000 in student aid relief funding.

What Marshall received was enough to keep him on track to graduate this spring. And to sweeten the deal, he recently accepted a full-time position with Northrop Grumman, which will start after he collects his diploma.

“I can't believe it," he says with a huge smile. “I think back to when I was in high school and my family was going through the thick of it. I would've never thought in a million years I would end up becoming an aerospace engineer. One day, I'll have my own sons or daughters and I'll be able to give them all the things I w​asn't able to have."

Visit the CSU's Coronavirus hub for more information about how the university has responded to the Coronavirus pandemic.​ ​

A group of students discussing something important
CSU CARES Provides Financial Relief for Students Experiencing Hardships Due to COVID-19
opening-the-floodgates.aspx
Checked Out To: Barrie, Matthewopening-the-floodgates.aspx
Checked Out To: Barrie, Matthew
  
11/8/2021 9:02 AMBarrie, Matthew11/8/202111/8/2021 8:00 AMCSU faculty, students and alumni are working on numerous solutions to the drought. Here are a few of the ways the CSU is keeping the state's glass half-full.CaliforniaStory
Opening the floodgates

Opening the Floodgates

When the state of California faces a challenge, the CSU community is the first to step up and spring into action. This has been evident during times of crisis such as fires, earthquakes and most recently with the pandemic. The drought is no different. With a concerted effort, CSU faculty, students and alumni are working on numerous solutions to this ongoing issue. Here are a few of the ways the CSU is keeping the state's glass half-full.


Birds search for food in a wetland area.

“When asked about the most important environmental issue facing the state, one in four Californians named water supply and drought.”

–Public Policy Institute of California

Leave It to Beavers

In addition to being voted “most adorable" in their class, beavers actually help create nature-based solutions for drought and fire management. Emily Fairfax, Ph.D., assistant professor of environmental science and resource management at California State University Channel Islands, has been using satellite data to compare landscapes with numerous beaver dams to those without dams during times of drought. What she found was quite remarkable.

“What I saw in those studies was that the beaver-dammed areas essentially didn't feel the drought," she explains. “It was just the same greenness year after year. This was in 2013 to 2016, when there were record-breaking droughts going on."

The beaver dams store water and act almost like a drip system, keeping plants green and lush. Dr. Fairfax's findings led to her next branch of research: determining whether or not beavers can also help maintain these wetland riparian ecosystems during fire season.

“My next study, called Smokey the Beaver, looked at five different fires," she says. “I saw that if you had beaver dams in a creek, the riparian zone burned three times less than if you didn't have beaver dams. With two streams that were right next to each other—one with beavers on it, the other one just a simple stream—the beaver-dammed one hardly burned at all, while in the undammed streams, the fire ripped through that landscape."

For Fairfax, next steps include continuing to provide data that supports the success of drought and fire mitigation via beaver dam behavior so the state can invest in the method. Secondly, she'd like to see a policy change that would allow the relocation of beavers in California.

“When you do have what's called a 'nuisance beaver,' when they move into San José or San Diego and it's not a good habitat for them and it's not good for the people, your only option is either deal with it in place or to kill the beaver," she says. “There's no option to live-trap that beaver and move it into the Los Padres National Forest, where there are a lot of streams that used to have beavers but don't right now and that could support them."

Fairfax is also conducting a field-based study with CSUCI students at a beaver complex on the Salinas River in San Luis Obispo County. “We've been taking photos and collecting data and doing remote sensing for the last year and a half," Fairfax says. “We saw it through the summertime drought and it just stayed so bright green and it's full of beavers. They just had babies, and now it looks like they're expanding out, so they're making that patch of greenery larger."

Emily Fairfax, Ph.D., assistant professor of environmental science and resource management at CSUCI, conducts research on how beaver dams create green areas that hold water and don’t burn during wildfires. 
 

CSUCI's Emily Fairfax, Ph.D., conducts research on how beaver dams create green areas that hold water and don’t burn during wildfires.


Recharging the Source

If you look at an aquifer as a bank account and groundwater as funds, California has been overdrawn for a long time. In an average year, the state relies on groundwater for 38 percent of its total water supply. During a drought, water is pumped out of the aquifer, which has led to subsidence, the gradual sinking of land.

“You can see instances of 20 feet of drop in ground surface since the 1970s due to subsidence," says Cordie Qualle, interim director of the California Water Institute (CWI) at California State University, Fresno. “If you start with $100 in your bank account and you have a $70 emergency, you can float that, right? What happens when you're at $30 and you have another $70 emergency? We're getting to the point where we've overdrawn and it's getting dangerous."

Faculty and student researchers at Fresno State are looking into innovative methods to approach groundwater recharge, a practice in which surface water saturates the soil and is then sent down to refill the aquifer.

“What we're looking at is a different way of doing that, which we call subsurface artificial groundwater recharge," Qualle explains. “We take a perforated pipe, put it in the ground and then force water into that pipe, which then goes down through the soil. We're trying to find out if this is an efficient and effective way of recharging water on a bigger scale, here in the San Joaquin Valley."

Cordie Qualle, interim director of the California Water Institute, works alongside a Fresno State student on a groundwater refr

Cordie Qualle, interim director of the California Water Institute, works alongside a Fresno State student on a groundwater refresh project.


Elevating the Water IQ

You see them as you drive down the interstate and leave the urban sprawl in the rearview mirror: small communities that pop up “in the middle of nowhere" among rows of crops such as grapes, fruit trees, almonds and pistachios. In large part, these are the towns that feed the nation, a place farmworkers and their families call home. The Central Valley produces a quarter of the food in the U.S. Often not connected to a municipal water district, these underrepresented, low-income communities count on wells for their water. But as groundwater is increasingly pumped out to meet needs, their wells are susceptible to going dry.

“My mantra is 'elevate the water IQ of the community,'" says Laura Ramos, programs manager at CWI. “There are a lot of misconceptions, so we've developed a water bootcamp to educate people on topics such as hydrology, surface water rights, dams, wells and regulations. Fresno State students serve as teachers and help develop the curriculum."

CWI is involved in a number of projects, including creating a shared vision for water in the San Joaquin Valley and conducting studies on whether it's feasible for small communities around Fresno to connect to a municipal water district.

The organization is also making sure San Joaquin Valley residents affected by drought know there are resources available to them, free of charge. The outreach effort—for which The Office of Community and Economic Development at Fresno State serves as the designated partnership secretariat—focuses on hard-to-reach communities.

“We placed ads in local churches and distributed flyers at flea markets, food banks and rural clinics," Ramos says.

Phase two will focus on unifying data that pinpoints the main areas where wells are running dry. “We want to identify these resources so we're not replicating data that's already out there," Ramos says. “We don't want to keep doing this every year. So how do we create systems and financing to make sure we don't?"

Laura Ramos, programs manager at The California Water Institute at Fresno State, works on projects that help small and disadvant

Laura Ramos, programs manager at The California Water Institute at Fresno State, works on projects that help small and disadvantaged communities attain sustainable access to drinking water.


CSULB Beach Transfer Transition Center staff at a bowling social.

The well that Lindsay, California, residents Neil and Jacquie Walker depended on for water recently went dry. The California Water Institute works with Self-Help Enterprises, an organization that provided the Walkers with a tank and hauled water, to connect residents in need of related resources.



What you can do

Reading about the drought can be overwhelming, but there are simple, everyday steps you can take to help. Here are just a few.

  • Turn water off when brushing teeth.
  • Only run the dishwasher when it's full.
  • Take shorter showers.
  • Consider using native plants in your landscaping.
  • Water your lawn early in the morning or later at night.
  • Use a broom to clean driveways instead of water.
  • Recycle indoor water to use on plants.
  • Adopt a tradition of Meatless Mondays.

See other ways the CSU is helping to change the way California manages water

Opening the Floodgates
CSUCCESS-FALL-2021.aspx
  
11/4/2021 2:41 PMKelly, Hazel11/3/202111/3/2021 10:45 AMLaunched in the fall, the CSUCCESS initiative is bridging the digital divide by providing free iPads to thousands of CSU students. And it’s only getting started.  Student SuccessStory

​​​​​​​​Many of us may take for granted the latest mobile technology and Wi-Fi access at our fingertips. But many CSU students face financial challenges, placing barriers to success in completing their coursework.

At the start of the fall 2021 term, eight CSU campuses collectively distributed more than 22,700 brand-new iPad technology bundles (iPad Air, Apple Pencil and Apple Smart Keyboard Folio) to incoming first-year and transfer students as part of CSUCCESS (California State University Connectivity Contributing to Equity and Student Success).

The CSU's largest device-distribution program has already made significant inroads into improving digital equity across the state. Putting these tools for success directly in students' hands, free of charge, and ready to use on the first day of class, was a vision of CSU Chancellor Joseph I. Castro's.

“I am very excited about CSUCCESS," says Dr. Castro. “As a first-generation college student myself, I struggled financially. I want to make sure we remove these barriers for our talented students."

 "A lot of people grow up with financial struggles ​and ​​can't afford a laptop that could really help them out."  —​Erik Lopez, CSUN freshman

young man in polo shirt and protective face mask stands holding white boxes.CSUN freshman Erik Lopez received his iPad technology bundle in August 2021, just before the start of the fall semester. 

​​

Erik Lopez, a freshman majoring in civil engineering at CSUN, knows first-hand what lack of access to a personal computing device is like. “In high school, it was kind of hard because I would be doing my homework in the library or had to borrow my brother's laptop and maybe go to a Starbucks because we don't have Wi-Fi at home," says Lopez, who received a CSUCCESS iPad technology bundle in August, just before the fall semester began.

“It seems simple, but [lack of technology] can really hold you back. A lot of people really do grow up with struggles financially, and they can't afford a laptop that could really help them out. I would struggle a lot because I wouldn't be able to do my homework on my own time when I wanted to. This iPad from CSUCCESS will help me do my homework in a more flexible schedule."​

[story continues below video]

Tools for Success in Students' Hands

CSUCCESS offered a new iPad Air, Apple Pencil and Apple Smart Keyboard Folio to every incoming first-year and transfer student at eight participating CSU campuses during Phase One. Students at CSUN share their thoughts about the program as they pick up their CSUCCESS technology bundles at the start of the fall 2021 term.



Many students across California reported having difficulties accessing quality devices and reliable internet during the pandemic. CSU campuses stepped up by offering mobile hot spots, short-term loaner laptops and adding Wi-Fi to parking lots to help overcome some of these obstacles. The CSUCCESS initiative builds on these efforts to address the issue at scale, making more high-quality devices available to more students—and they get to keep them for the duration of their CSU undergraduate experience.

close up of young woman smiling at cameraCal State LA student Anayelia Mejia transferred from Taft College in the fall and received a CSUCCESS technology bundle. Mejia's parents immigrated from Mexico and she is the first in her family to attend college.


Anayelia Mejia, a Cal State LA transfer student majoring in child development, is using her new CSUCCESS iPad to stay organized with homework and take notes in class with the Apple Pencil. Like Lopez, Mejia also faced challenges with technology access during the pandemic while studying at Taft College.

“I didn't have the proper devices to make my homework assignments as files and I struggled a lot. Using only my cell phone during the last two years for turn-in on Canvas was indeed a bit of a struggle," says Mejia who is a first-generation college student.

Bridging the digital divide is not only critical for student success, it's also key to achieving educational equity.

“The CSUCCESS program shows tremendous promise to advance our twin goals of student success and educational equity by helping our students bridge the digital divide and establish a technological foundation for achievement from day one of their college journey," says Chancellor Castro. Eliminating equity gaps in graduation rates is one of the CSU's biggest priorities as part of Graduation Initiative 2025.

The CSU plans to expand the CSUCCESS program to additional campuses in January 2022, as part of Phase Two. Incoming first-year and transfer students at all participating campuses are eligible to receive a device bundle in January by registering with their campus.

“This is only the beginning. Eventually, we hope that all incoming CSU students will have access to their own personal device to help them succeed academically and beyond," says Mike Pronovost, interim director of Systemwide IT Mobile & Shared Services at the CSU Chancellor's Office.

 

Visit the CSUCCESS website to learn more about this game-changing initiative. ​


man in suit stands next to two women at an outdoor tent holding new boxed iPadCSU Channel Islands' Interim President Richard Yao stands with a student and staff member during a CSUCCESS device distribution event on the campus. 

man in protective face masks hands a stack of white boxes to a person in front of counterCSUN Campus Store department manager Brian Osborn hands ​a stack of new CSUCCESS Apple devices to a student. 

Three male students stand in a row holding up their new boxed iPads.  CSUN students pose after receiving their new CSUCCESS iPads at the Campus Store.  ​​


woman wearing backpack stands at counter setting up her new iPadA CSU Bakersfield student powers up her new CSUCCESS iPad at a campus distribution event in August 2021.  
​​

woman in blue sut talks to a student inside an office environment with technology all aroundCSU Bakersfield President Lynnette Zelezny speaks with a student as he unboxes his new CSUCCESS iPad during a campus distribution event. 


man stands at looking into a window office where another man is holding a stack of white boxes A CSU Bakersfield student waits to receive his CSUCCESS Apple technology bundle from a campus IT staff member. 


easel sign advertising new ipads for students sits on concrete pathway of a college campusSignage at the CSU Bakersfield campus points students to a CSUCCESS device distribution location. 


woman holding ipad up inside a car while another woman stands outside the car in a light blue suit.CSU San Marcos President Ellen Neufeldt helps distribute CSUCCESS devices at a drive-up event on campus. 


ipad and white sylus device sits on a desk overlapping an open book.First-year and incoming transfer students at participating CSU campuses are eligible to receive a new iPad Air, Smart Keyboard Folio and Apple Pencil to enhance their academic experience. 

Man in white shirt hands a stack of new boxed computing devices to a female student inside a college administrative building.
Student Tech Equity Levels Up with CSUCCESS
CSU-Campuses-Earn-Seal-of-Excelencia-for-Accelerating-Latinx-Student-Success.aspx
  
11/3/2021 1:26 PMMcCarthy, Michelle11/2/202111/2/2021 11:10 AMFive of only 24 seals in the nation now belong to CSU institutions.DiversityStory
​​​​​​​Three CSU campuses—Fresno State, Cal State Fullerton and San Diego State—were awarded the 2021 Seal of Excelencia from Excelencia in Education last week for outstanding commitment to serving Latinx students. CSU Channel Islands and Sacramento State earned the recognition in 2019 and 2020, respectively. 

“These seal-certified institutions have been able to articulate and demonstrate they are modeling the behavior we need to see to accelerate Latinx student success,” Excelencia co-founder and CEO Deborah Santiago stated in a press release​. “They are having measurable impact in changing the face of higher education.”

The institutions earned the Excelencia seal certification by demonstrating specific inclusive strategies, implementing programs with evidence of effectiveness, and registering results that showed they are intentionally serving Latinx students, according to the press release. 

Excelencia provided examples of noteworthy programs or practice​s at the seal-certified schools, including Fresno State’s South Valley Integrated Teacher Education Program (ITEP), Cal State Fullerton’s Center for Scholars (CFS) and San Diego State’s Building on Inclusive Excellence hiring program.

The group also highlighted programs at two CSU campuses, the Mathematics Intensive Summer Session (MISS) at CSUF and the PARC Supplemental Instruction​ (SI) Program at Sacramento State, in its list of 2021 Examples of Excelencia finalists.

The CSU serves more than 272,000 Hispanic/Latinx students—almost half of the CSU’s student body—and awarded more than 44,000 bachelor’s degrees to Hispanic/Latinx students in 2019-20. In fact, 62% of the total number of bachelor’s degrees earned by Hispanics in California are CSU degrees.

CSU campuses were recently recognized by Hispanic Outlook on Education for being among the nation's top 100 universities enrolling and graduating the highest numbers of Hispanic/Latinx students. Among the top ten for awarding bachelor’s degrees to Hispanic/Latinx students are Northridge, Fullerton, Los Angeles and Long Beach.

As 21 of the CSU’s 23 campuses are designated Hispanic-Serving Institutions​ (HSIs), the university is committed to being a leader in elevating the lives and experiences of Hispanic/Latinx individuals. This federal designation qualifies campuses for additional funding opportunities that can further boost Latinx/Hispanic student achievement and help close equity gaps, key goals of the university's Graduation Initiative 2025​

The CSU educates the most ethnically, economically and academically diverse student body in the nation. Learn more about diversity at the CSU.
A person wearing a graduation cap and gown raising their arms in celebration
CSU Campuses Earn Seal of Excelencia for Accelerating Latinx Student Success
CSU-Campuses-Named-First-Ever-Fulbright-HSI-Leaders.aspx
  
11/2/2021 8:42 AMSalvador, Christianne11/2/202111/2/2021 8:35 AMNine CSU campuses recognized as Fulbright HSI Leaders for their commitment to fostering international exchange for students, staff of all backgrounds.InternationalStory

The Fulbright Program proudly commends nine CSU campuses as Fulbright HSI Leaders in the designation's inaugural year.

CSU campuses at Chico, Dominguez Hills, Fullerton, Long Beach, Northridge, San Diego, San Francisco, San José and Sonoma are among the 35 Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSI) nationwide recognized for their commitment to fostering international exchange and promoting the Fulbright Program's opportunities to students and faculty of all backgrounds.

The Fulbright Program is the U.S. government's flagship international educational exchange program. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, the program was created to increase mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries. High-achieving scholars are given the opportunity to participate in international academic exchange to study, teach, conduct research and contribute to finding solutions to important international challenges.

A goal of the Fulbright Program is to reflect the diversity of American society in the students and scholars it sends abroad. With one of the most diverse student bodies in the nation, the CSU is instrumental in building diversity and inclusion within the program. In addition, 21 CSU campuses are designated HSIs, with 46 percent of the university's 432,000 undergraduate students being Hispanic or Latinx.

The new Fulbright HSI Leaders initiative celebrates the special role the nation's HSIs play in supporting international exchange.

“The Fulbright Program aligns with the CSU's mission of providing a high-quality education for students of all backgrounds," says Sylvia A. Alva, Ph.D., CSU executive vice chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs. “We applaud the Fulbright Program for its work in opening doors to new discoveries and opportunities, and encouraging our diverse scholars to contribute their distinctive talents to the world we share."

Fulbright is active in more than 160 countries worldwide and partners with governments, institutions, corporations and foundations in foreign countries and in the United States. More than 400,000 "Fulbrighters" from all over the world have participated in the program since its inception in 1946.

2021 marks the 75th anniversary of the Fulbright Program. Throughout the year, celebrations will highlight the impressive accomplishments of Fulbright alumni, the legacy of the program and its impacts on education, industries, culture and communities.

Visit the Fulbright Program website to learn more.​

CSU Campuses Named Among First-Ever Fulbright HSI Leaders
Supporting-Student-Veterans-2021.aspx
  
11/11/2021 8:14 AMRuble, Alisia11/1/202111/1/2021 2:25 PMThe CSU is dedicated to the success of students who served.VeteransStory

​​​The CSU's commitment to student success extends to all students, especially those who serve or have served our country. Approximately 7,500 servicemembers and veterans are currently enrolled at the CSU, and more than 11,000 dependents of servicemembers and veterans.

“An important part of our mission is to serve those who served," says Marshall Thomas, Ed.D., director of Veterans Affairs at the CSU's Chancellor's Office. 

Each CSU campus has a Veterans Success Center (also known as a Veterans Resource Center) that acts as the hub of information and support for military-connected students. Students can find information on student veteran organizations, benefits for state and federal veterans and dependents of veterans, and other resources available to military-connected students and those who are thinking about attending the CSU.

Some campuses also offer customized educational experiences and career support for veterans. The Veterans Education Program at Fresno State offers transitional education and career services for returning veterans of the Central Valley. The program provides returning veterans with a parallel admission route into the university, offering required coursework in cohorts exclusively for veterans. After successful completion, student veterans may transition to matriculated status at Fresno State.

CSU San Marcos has a program to help student vets discover careers in sustainable energy, called Veterans to Energy Careers (VTEC). The university recently received a $6 million grant to expand the successful internship program.

Many veterans may also be eligible for credit for prior learning​, or training they received while serving in the military, that will transfer to the CSU, shortening their time to degree.  

Countless student veterans and veteran alumni have earned trajectory-changing degrees at CSU campuses. And for at least eight years, a student veteran has been among the annual recipients of the CSU Trustees' Award for Outstanding Achievement for demonstrating high academic performance, personal accomplishments, community service and financial need.

This year, CSU Monterey Bay student veteran Dillon Herrick was named the 2021 Wells Fargo Veteran Scholar. "As a veteran and scholar, Dillon Herrick inspires us all with his service, his determination and academic achievement, his dedication to the values of his college, and his commitment to community," said CSUMB Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, Katherine Kantardjieff, Ph.D.

Exemplary military veterans have a wide-ranging impact, not least their own families and communities. Read reflections from 23 CSU students on how a veteran has shaped their lives. Veteran students are nothing short of remarkable and inspiring.

Supporting Student Veterans
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11/8/2021 8:19 AMMcCarthy, Michelle11/1/202111/1/2021 8:00 AMFind our the many way drought affects California and its residents.   CaliforniaStory
TROUBLED WATERS

Tapped Out

For most Californians, it's a given: Turn on your faucet and water flows out. It makes it easy to take for granted a substance so essential to survival. Anyone who's lived in the Golden State for an extended period of time is familiar with the concept of drought—so much so that residents have become numb to it, brushing aside the severe impact it may have on their most basic needs. As climate change alters California's landscape at an alarming pace, this may no longer be a viable option.

Here are some of the ways drought affects California and its residents.    

Bad Math: The California Equation

Increasing Heat + Less Snowpack for Water Storage + Less Rain + Ag Industry Tapping Into Groundwater = Megadrought

The domino effect: Drought leads to dried-out brush, which becomes fuel for wildfires. Wildfires incinerate brush that would normally absorb rainfall. As a result, during the rainy season, residential areas become flooded. Prolonged periods of flooding can lead to landslides.

“Climate change is screaming into our faces.”

–Dr. Emily Fairfax, assistant professor of environmental science and resource management, CSUCI

Putting Out Fires

Drought and fire are a toxic relationship. As rainfall decreases in California and temperatures rise, a perfect stage is set for a wildfire season that seems to have neither a start nor an end date. Dry soil leads to trees dying off, brush becoming flammable and dried-out vegetation serving as incendiary fuel for wildfires. In a vicious cycle, water that is already in short supply is then needed to put out the fires.

“Typically, you wouldn't see a wildfire until September or October," says Cordie Qualle, interim director of the California Water Institute at California State University, Fresno. “Last year, we had fires all summer. They just kept going and going and going. All that means is you have a very dry watershed that's overgrown. The drought gives you low humidity, low water content. The rest of it has to do with our hot California summers. You've got yourself a big recipe for a fire. It's both a blessing and a curse. From the agricultural side, those hot summers drive our agricultural output. From the forest fires side, it's a disaster."

What many residents might not know is that droughts are actually more costly for the state of California than fires. According to Drought.gov​, “Since 1980, the U.S. has sustained 258 weather and climate disasters where the overall damage costs reached or exceeded $1 billion. Among these, 26 droughts cost the nation at least $249 billion. Only hurricanes were more costly."

One of the reasons many people aren't aware of the economic impact is due to optics. It's not exactly easy to capture a photo of a drought and its implications, while dramatic images of raging fires engulfing residences are quick to catch the public's attention.   

Secondly, drought is categorized and funded differently than other natural catastrophes by the federal government. “The U.S. Secretary of Agriculture issues a drought emergency declaration," says Gillisann Harootunian, Ph.D., executive director of University Initiatives at Fresno State. “With a quick onset disaster like a wildfire or flood, FEMA gets involved instead. A drought has a slow onset with prolonged damage. It's rarely classified as a disaster under the Stafford Act that triggers the massive FEMA response, even though a drought is disastrous economically and lasts a lot longer."

A ramp closed sign sits at the foot of a boat ramp.  

Sinking Land

As the climate warms, rain is unable to freeze, and an increasingly smaller stretch of the Sierra Mountains receives snow, which is a major contributor to California's water supply. We rely on that runoff to fill up reservoirs. When there isn't enough water above ground, we must rely on groundwater.

“In drought years, farmers and ranchers have been pumping water out of the aquifer faster than it can be replenished," says Alison Bridger, Ph.D., professor of Meteorology & Climate Science at San José State University. “And that's led to a lot of sinking—some land has sunk by as much as six feet. Then the aquifer collapses, and once it's collapsed, you can't reinflate. When you break it, you've lost it."

Dr. Harootunian further explains: “As the aquifer is depleted, rocks and soil compact and fall in on themselves, damaging the infrastructure above. Eventually, the subsoil can compact to such an extent that the storage capacity of an aquifer is permanently damaged."

Joe Del Bosque, owner of Del Bosque Farms in the Central Valley and alumnus of Fresno State says farmers are dealing with natural droughts and regulated droughts. A number of regulations have diverted water to the environment to protect smelt and salmon, leaving farmers with a third of the supply they had in 1990.

“As a result, farmers have gone back to groundwater pumping because of the loss of surface water," he says. “Subsidence [the gradual sinking of land] is a big concern. If the California Aqueduct that passes by my land sinks a foot, that canal may lose its capacity to transport water."

“Because it's getting warmer, evaporation will increase, so even if you get the same amount of rainfall, more of it's going to evaporate before it can get into a reservoir or sink into the groundwater.”

–Alison Bridger, Ph.D., San José State

The Price of Food

Drought has a direct impact on the food chain in California and how much consumers are going to pay at the grocery store. Agriculture demands water—and lots of it—whether it be for crops or livestock.

“Normally, ag water is around $40 or $50 an acre-foot [one acre-foot equals approximately 325,851 gallons]," Qualle says. “Because of the drought, it's somewhere around $200 to $1,200 an acre-foot. They're also going to have to charge more because they're paying so much more for the water. That's going to be reflected in prices."

Less water means reduced crops, which will affect availability of certain goods. “Some nut farmers aren't irrigating this year," he continues. “They're basically dropping them on the ground to relieve stress on the trees and trying to keep them alive. What that says is there won't be that much commodity available in the market."

This year, there has been a decrease in the planting of tomatoes due to the drought. That will trickle down to the consumer in the way of more expensive tomato products: pizza sauce, spaghetti sauce, ketchup. “For an average household, that may limit what they can buy," Del Bosque explains. “It's going to impact working-class and lower-income people who are not going to be able to afford the cost of produce."

“As extreme drought claims most of the state, California Governor Gavin Newsom…asked Californians to voluntarily cut their water use by 15 percent.”

–CalMatters

When the Well Runs Dry

Like many other issues, drought often takes a greater toll on low-income communities, where residents depend on private wells for water. There are pockets of these communities throughout California, but the majority are found in the San Joaquin Valley, and a lot of the residents are farmworkers.

“The San Joaquin Valley is very groundwater driven," says Laura Ramos, programs manager at the California Water Institute. “These towns are in danger of having their wells go dry. If their groundwater level drops lower than what the current well is, a new well can cost upward of $50,000. What we saw in the last drought was that there were so many wells going dry that even if these communities had the money, there was nobody to build the well, because everybody had a backlog of three or four months. There are some programs offered by the state of California to help those disadvantaged communities, but sometimes there's not much that can be done if there isn't water underneath them."

STORY: MICHELLE MCCARTHY

PHOTOGRAPHY: Patrick Record

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CSU-Opens-Student-Success-Analytics-Certificate-Program-to-National-Audience.aspx
  
10/26/2021 10:39 AMRuble, Alisia10/26/202110/26/2021 8:50 AMExpanding access to the program will help participating colleges and universities use data to close equity gaps among historically underserved students.Student SuccessPress Release

​​

The California State University announced its acclaimed Student Success Analytics Certificate Program will be made available nationwide to all college and university faculty, staff and administrators interested in participating in the interactive professional development program.

“Over the last several years we've seen how analyzing student data can help faculty, staff and administrators close equity gaps on CSU campuses. We have developed a unique and innovative program that has been successful within our system, and we are pleased to welcome our higher education colleagues to be a part of this vitally important work," said CSU Chancellor Joseph I. Castro.

The program creates an environment where participants can work collaboratively to draw equity-focused insights from their campus data and move toward action. The Office of the Chancellor launched the program five years ago. Since then, teams from all 23 CSU campuses have joined the learning community. Alumni of the program have used data from the CSU Student Success Dashboard to create programs improving student success on their home campuses in line with the goals of the Graduation Initiative 2025.

“We are laser-focused on our student success and equity goals. Over the last five years this program has helped the CSU continue on the path to achieving these goals by creating dynamic learning environments for campus teams to use data to drive positive change," said CSU Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs Sylvia Alva.

Participation has increased tenfold since its inception, and the program has begun to garner national interest.

“Last year we welcomed teams from the University of Northern Colorado, Southern University, and Stanford University to our learning community. This year we look forward to engaging with additional participants from around the country to learn strategies for improving evidence-based equity-minded practices on their campus," said Assistant Vice Chancellor for Student Success Jeff Gold. 

The application process is open and runs through early December. The program begins on January 28, 2022 and runs through April 29, 2022. A certificate is awarded to all participants who successfully complete the program.

# # #

About the California State University

The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 56,000 faculty and staff and 486,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 132,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter​​​

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CSU Opens Student Success Analytics Certificate Program to National Audience
CAHSSA-Social-Sciences-grant-2021.aspx
  
10/25/2021 11:00 AMKelly, Hazel10/25/202110/25/2021 9:45 AMCSU social scientists receive grant from National Science Foundation to build and broaden research and opportunities among minority-serving institutions. ResearchStory

​​​​​A new NSF Build and Broaden 2.0 grant given to the California State University and University of California will expand external funding opportunities in social sciences across the state, with a focus on Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs).

Totaling $796,858 in funding for the CSU and UC, with $260,740 going directly to the CSU, the program will create the California Alliance for Hispanic-Serving Social Science Advancement (CAHSSA). The group will provide professional development opportunities for hundreds of social sciences faculty across the CSU and UC to help strengthen proposals for external research funding. The NSF award will also support research and analysis into how HSIs may face bias and other barriers when seeking external funding for social science research.

“This grant and the creation of CAHSSA is important because it shines a spotlight on the social sciences that are sometimes overshadowed by STEM research funding activity," says Leslie Ponciano, Ph.D., director of research opportunities at the CSU Chancellor's Office and co-principal investigator on the grant.

“This NSF grant provides a critical opportunity to identify and mitigate some of the barriers to faculty in the CSU working to secure external funding for research in the social sciences," says Billy Wagner, MPH, Ph.D., health sciences and sociology professor at CSU Channel Islands and executive director of the CSU's Social Science Research and Instructional Center (SSRIC) multi-campus affinity group. Dr. Wagner is also a principal investigator on the NSF award.

“We are excited to be a resource for CSU researchers to collaborate with each other across the CSU system and with the UCs," Dr. Ponciano says.

A series of funded grant activities will take place over a three-year period, including professional development in the form of webcasts, grant writing groups and leadership seminars. Social sciences faculty and leadership from all CSU campuses will be invited to participate.

“The overarching goal is to improve the quality and quantity of funded research in the social sciences across California," says Ponciano. With 21 of its 23 campuses designated as HSIs, the CSU's dedicated faculty will have a powerful impact in diversifying the social sciences and creating innovative research projects and proposals.

Funding for the work begins in October 2021 and runs through August 2024.

 

Learn more about research, scholarship and creative activity across the CSU. 

​​

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Expanding Reach of Social Sciences at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
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11/1/2021 9:20 AMMcCarthy, Michelle10/25/202110/25/2021 8:00 AMYou’ve heard the term drought, but what does it mean, who does it affect and how is it categorized?ResearchStory
TROUBLED WATERS

Troubled Waters

It's difficult to avoid the news splashed across recent headlines:

“Gavin Newsom declares drought emergency for most of California."
“A harrowing California fire season is here, fueled by historic drought."
“In California's agricultural heartland, thousands of wells could soon run dry."
“First-ever water shortage declared on the Colorado River, triggering water cuts for some states in the West."

It's also easy to be overwhelmed by it all. Here, we break it down for you.

Drought, Defined

Quite simply, a drought occurs when there is a duration of abnormally dry conditions. What's not simple is the magnitude of destruction it can create.

“What causes a drought is a dry, warm year," says Gillisann Harootunian, Ph.D., executive director of University Initiatives at California State University, Fresno. “And with climate change, you're getting more warm years, which means the chances of having a warm year and a dry year coincide are increasing. Climate change is exacerbating drought."

“Human-induced climate change is already affecting many weather and climate extremes in every region across the globe.”

–United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

How Much Water Does California Need?

Picture your morning routine: You take a shower, brush your teeth, pour a cup of coffee, refill the dog bowl, make sure the sprinklers are programmed—all activities that require water. Now imagine 39 million Californians doing the same. In 2016, the average resident used 85 gallons of water per day. In all, the state goes through 38 billion gallons per day.

Add to that the approximately 34 million acre-feet of water needed to irrigate 9.6 million acres of farmland each year. This land is vital to the state’s agricultural industry, which adds $20 billion to the economy.​

“California receives 75 percent of its rain and snow in the watersheds north of Sacramento. However, 80 percent of California’s water demand comes from the southern two-thirds of the state.”

–California Department of Water Sources

34 million
acre-feet of water needed to irrigate 9.6 million acres of farmland each year

the average resident uses
85 gallons
of water per day

660 Gallons
of water needed to produce one hamburger

1.1 Gallons
of water needed to produce one almond


Go With the Flow

Where does California get its water? Rain is an important factor. As precipitation falls from the sky, our two main sources are replenished: surface water (lakes, rivers and reservoirs) and groundwater (aquifers). As surface water runs low, water must be pumped out of the ground. Snowcaps also serve as a natural storage source since rain freezes at higher temperatures, melts in the spring and then sends runoff into reservoirs. Dry years mean less rain, which results in less water replenishment.

“Our crops in California don't really like rain during the growing season, but they need water,” says Joe Del Bosque, owner of Del Bosque Farms in the Central Valley and alumnus of Fresno State. “Water falls in the mountains, is captured by reservoirs and is stored there by the state and federal water projects. When we need it, they release it down some rivers and it comes into the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, where it’s picked up by pumps and distributed to Central and Southern California and the Bay Area.”

“2021 tied for the third driest year on record.”

–AccuWeather

THE WATER CYCLE

THE WATER CYCLE THE WATER CYCLE

Types of Drought

Droughts are commonly placed into four categories. Each one is based on the area it affects.

  • ​Meteorological: deals with the shortfall of expected precipitation and how long it lasts
  • Agricultural: impact on crops
  • Hydrologic: impact on water supply
  • Socioeconomic: impact on underserved communities

They are also organized by severity and consequences.

Abnormally Dry (D1):
Slowing of crop growth, above average fire risk.

Moderate Drought (D2):
Damage to crops, high fire risk, low water levels, some water shortage.

Severe Drought (D3):
Loss of crops likely, very high fire risk, water shortages lead to water restrictions.

Extreme Drought (D4):
Major crop losses, extreme fire danger, widespread water shortages/restrictions.

Exceptional Drought (D5):
Widespread crop loss; exceptional fire risk; water shortages in reservoirs, streams and wells, which  cause water emergencies.

“Since 2000, the longest duration of drought (D1–D4) in California lasted 376 weeks, beginning on December 27, 2011 and ending on March 5th, 2019. The most intense period of drought occurred the week of July 29, 2014, when D4 affected 58.41 percent of California land.”

–National Centers for Environmental Information

Drone foot​age of Folsom Lake captures a dried-out marina in September 2021.​​

​​​ ​
Troubled Waters
Graduation-Rates-for-All-CSU-Students-Continue-to-Climb-GI2025-2021.aspx
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10/25/2021 1:18 PMKelly, Hazel10/22/202110/22/2021 11:10 AMRenewed focus on eliminating equity gaps will drive future CSU student success efforts.Graduation InitiativePress Release

​​The hard work to improve student success across all 23 California State University (CSU) campuses continues to pay off as graduation rates have risen to all-time highs for both first-time and transfer students, despite the turbulence associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. A record 132,167 degrees were conferred by CSU campuses in 2020-21—nearly 25,000 more than prior to the launch of the university-wide initiative in 2015.

“Our resilient students undoubtedly deserve our respect and congratulations for their perseverance and accomplishments," said Executive Vice Chancellor of Academic and Student Affairs Sylvia A. Alva. “And we should celebrate our own extraordinary efforts to help keep nearly half a million students learning, engaged and moving forward despite unprecedented challenges. The CSU's exceptional faculty, staff and administrators have shown truly remarkable commitment and fortitude," added Alva, who shared data related to increases in graduation rates during a university-wide virtual convening​ held on October 22 that drew more than 2,000 faculty, staff, leaders and students. Among the information shared by Alva:

  • The four-year graduation rate for first-time students increased to 33% from 19% at the launch of the initiative.
  • The six-year graduation rate for first-time students increased to 63% from 57% at the launch of the initiative.
  • The two-year graduation rate for transfer students increased to 44% from 31% at the launch of the initiative.
  • The four-year graduation rate for transfer students increased to 80% from 73% at the launch of the initiative.

While student achievement has reached unprecedented heights on all 23 CSU campuses, the university continues to face challenges in eliminating equity gaps, which is the difference in graduation rates between students from historically underserved backgrounds and their peers.

During the convening, CSU Chancellor Joseph I. Castro shared initial details about a university-wide action plan that will be implemented to close equity gaps across the board.

“This has always been a top priority, and indeed we have a moral imperative to do better for our students," said Castro, who highlighted several examples of bold strategies to be implemented. “This plan, developed in conjunction with an advisory committee of expert stakeholders from across the system, pinpoints actions that all campuses must tackle immediately."

The plan's action items include:

  • An immediate, systemwide re-enrollment campaign with specific goals for bringing underserved students back to CSU campuses beginning in spring 2022.
  • ​Implementation of digital degree planners across all 23 campuses by June 2022 to ensure that every student has access to a clear pathway to graduation.
  • A university-wide focus on dramatically improving student learning outcomes in key courses with the largest numbers of non-passing grades and highest enrollments of underserved students.

 All CSU campuses have also been asked to develop their own customized action plans to address equity gaps immediately. Additional details about the university-wide action plan will be shared at the upcoming CSU Board of Trustees meeting taking place on November 9 and 10, 2021.


About the California State University

The  California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 56,000 faculty and staff and 486,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 132,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter

Woman wearing graduation robe and cap with hand in the air in triumph and celebration at a university commencement ceremony.
Graduation Rates for All CSU Students Continue to Climb with Graduation Initiative 2025
Statement-from-CSU-Chancellor-Joseph-I-Castro-on-the-Pending-Retirement-of-CSUMB-President-Eduardo-M-Ochoa.aspx
  
10/18/2021 11:43 AMSalvador, Christianne10/18/202110/18/2021 11:40 AMOn October 18, 2021, CSUMB President Eduardo M. Ochoa announced that he will retire as campus president on June 30, 2022. LeadershipPress Release

​​​​The following statement can be attributed to California State University Chancellor Joseph I. Castro:

“Throughout his many years of service to the California State University (CSU) and in higher education, President Ochoa has demonstrated an unwavering commitment to improving opportunities for students from all backgrounds.

“During his time leading California State University, Monterey Bay (CSUMB), the campus has experienced unprecedented gains in four-year graduation rates for first-year students and two-year completion rates for transfer students. Those graduates go on to make an indelible impact on Monterey County and throughout California.

“As a champion for higher education and a policymaker at the national level President Ochoa brought a unique perspective that he shared with his fellow CSU presidents and me. Tens of thousands of students at CSUMB, and indeed millions of students throughout the CSU have benefitted from his broad experience and wise guidance.

“I congratulate President Ochoa on a long and distinguished career and thank him for his efforts on behalf of our students."

On October 18, 2021, CSUMB President Eduardo M. Ochoa announced that he will retire as campus president on June 30, 2022. Ochoa has led CSUMB since 2012, first serving as interim president before being appointed president in 2013. Ochoa has served in a variety of roles throughout the CSU including formerly serving as provost and vice president of academic affairs at Sonoma State University, dean of the College of Business Administration at Cal Poly Pomona and as a member of the faculty at both Fresno State and Cal State LA.

The CSU will soon launch a national search for Ochoa's successor. Under university policy, the chair of the CSU Board of Trustees, Lillian Kimbell, and Chancellor Castro will select a committee made up of campus and community stakeholders who will be publicly announced at a later date. Campus and community input will be sought in an open forum held on campus. 

# # #

About the California State University

The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, 56,000 faculty and staff and 486,000 students. Half of the CSU's students transfer from California community colleges. Created in 1960, the mission of the CSU is to provide high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 132,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.​

Statement from CSU Chancellor Joseph I. Castro on the Pending Retirement of CSUMB President Eduardo M. Ochoa
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11/22/202111/22/2021 10:00 AMPerez will assume the leadership of the campus on January 3, 2022 after the departure of current SJSU president Dr. Mary A. Papazian.
Stephen Perez Appointed Interim President of San José State UniversityLeadershipPress Release
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11/17/202111/17/2021 1:00 PMMore than half of CSU's campuses now participate in groundbreaking technology distribution program, bridging digital equity for students across California.More than half of CSU's campuses now participate in groundbreaking technology distribution program, bridging digital equity for students across California.
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14 CSU Campuses to Provide Incoming Spring 2022 Students with Free Computing Devices through CSUCCESSStudent SuccessPress Release
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10/26/202110/26/2021 8:50 AMExpanding access to the program will help participating colleges and universities use data to close equity gaps among historically underserved students.
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CSU Opens Student Success Analytics Certificate Program to National AudienceStudent SuccessPress Release
Graduation-Rates-for-All-CSU-Students-Continue-to-Climb-GI2025-2021.aspx
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10/22/202110/22/2021 11:10 AMRenewed focus on eliminating equity gaps will drive future CSU student success effortsRenewed focus on eliminating equity gaps will drive future CSU student success efforts.
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Graduation Rates for All CSU Students Continue to Climb with Graduation Initiative 2025Graduation InitiativePress Release
Statement-from-CSU-Chancellor-Joseph-I-Castro-on-the-Pending-Retirement-of-CSUMB-President-Eduardo-M-Ochoa.aspx
  
10/18/202110/18/2021 11:40 AMOn October 18, 2021, CSUMB President Eduardo M. Ochoa announced that he will retire as campus president on June 30, 2022.
Statement from CSU Chancellor Joseph I. Castro on the Pending Retirement of CSUMB President Eduardo M. OchoaLeadershipPress Release
California-State-University-Will-Not-Make-Future-Fossil-Fuel-Investments-in-University-Investment-Portfolios-and-Funds.aspx
  
10/6/202110/6/2021 12:55 PMCSU Chancellor Joseph I. Castro announced today that the university will not pursue any future investments in fossil fuels in the university’s three investment portfolios.
California State University Will Not Make Future Fossil Fuel Investments in University Investment Portfolios and FundsSustainabilityPress Release
CSU-to-Begin-Accepting-Applications-for-Fall-2022-on-October-1.aspx
  
9/30/20219/30/2021 8:05 AMCal State Apply enables all CSU incoming freshman, transfer, graduate and international students to apply to multiple CSU campuses with just one application.
CSU to Begin Accepting Applications for Fall 2022 on October 1ApplyPress Release
California-State-University-Channel-Islands-Presidential-Search-Committee-to-Hold-Virtual-Open-Forum.aspx
  
9/28/20219/28/2021 1:55 PMThe CSU Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of California State University Channel Islands to succeed Erika D.  Beck, Ph.D., who became president of California State University, Northridge in January 2021.
California State University Channel Islands Presidential Search Committee to Hold Virtual Open ForumLeadershipPress Release
CSU-Trustees-to-Honor-23-Top-Student-Scholars-for-Outstanding-Achievement.aspx
  
9/13/20219/13/2021 8:00 AMThe Trustees’ Award is the university’s highest recognition of student achievement. Awardees will be acknowledged during the Board of Trustees meeting on September 14.
CSU Trustees to Honor 23 Top Student Scholars for Outstanding AchievementStudent SuccessPress Release
CSU-Launch-HSI-Equity-Innovation-Hub-2021.aspx
  
8/31/20218/31/2021 6:00 AMPartnership with Apple and state of California will lead to new and additional educational pathways for students in STEM.Partnership with Apple and state of California will lead to new and additional educational pathways for students in STEM.
​Rendering of Global HSI Equity Innovation Hub building at CSUN campus.
CSU to Launch Global Hispanic Serving Institution Equity Innovation HubSTEMPress Release
Chancellor-Statement-FDA-Vax-Approval-2021.aspx
  
8/23/20218/23/2021 9:00 AMCalifornia State University Chancellor Joseph I. Castro released the following statement on the FDA's approval of the Pfizer vaccine.California State University Chancellor Joseph I. Castro released the following statement on the FDA's approval of the Pfizer vaccine.
​CSU Statement on FDA's Full Approval of Pfizer's COVID-19 VaccinePolicyPress Release
California-State-University-to-Launch-Center-for-Transformational-Educator-Preparation-Programs.aspx
  
8/12/20218/12/2021 1:20 PMCalifornia’s leading institution for teacher preparation continues to advance diversity in the state’s teaching workforce. California’s leading institution for teacher preparation continues to advance diversity in the state’s teaching workforce.
California State University to Launch Center for Transformational Educator Preparation ProgramsApplyPress Release
California-State-University-to-Implement-COVID-19-Vaccination-Requirement-for-Fall-2021-Term.aspx
  
7/27/20217/27/2021 10:00 AMThe California State University announced today that it will require faculty, staff and students who are accessing campus facilities at any university location to be immunized against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.
California State University to Implement COVID-19 Vaccination Requirement for Fall 2021 TermApplyPress Release
New-CSUCCESS-Initiative-Will-Enhance-Equity-and-Student-Achievement-for-CSU-Students.aspx
  
7/12/20217/12/2021 8:25 AMLargest-ever CSU device distribution will provide iPad Air for up to 35,000 first-year and new transfer students at eight campusesLargest-ever CSU device distribution will provide iPad Air for up to 35,000 first-year and new transfer students at eight campuses
New CSUCCESS Initiative Will Enhance Equity and Student Achievement for CSU StudentsApplyPress Release
Sylvia-A-Alva-Appointed-California-State-University-Executive-Vice-Chancellor-for-Academic-and-Student-Affairs.aspx
  
7/6/20217/6/2021 10:30 AMAlva joins the CSU Chancellor's Office and Chancellor Castro'​s executive team from Cal Poly Pomona where she currently serves as provost and vice president for academic affairs.
Sylvia A. Alva Appointed California State University Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs LeadershipPress Release
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Former-SFSU-First-Ladys-Book-to-be-Published-in-Spring-2022.aspx
  
12/2/202112/2/2021 8:00 AMStory
Phyllis Wong
Former SFSU First Lady's Book to be Published in Spring 2022
21-CSU-Campuses-Honored-as-Equity-Champions-of-Higher-Education.aspx
  
11/29/202111/29/2021 8:00 AMThe awards are a testament to the success of the Associate Degree for Transfer (ADT) program. Transfer StudentStory
21 CSU Campuses Honored as Equity Champions of Higher Education
On-The-Seas-Of-Success.aspx
  
11/15/202111/15/2021 3:45 PMLearn how innovative programs at CSU campuses help increase gender equity in traditionally male-dominated fields.Student SuccessStory
On The Seas Of Success
CSU-CARES-Provides-Financial-Relief-for-Students-Experiencing-Hardships-Due-to-COVID-19.aspx
  
11/10/202111/10/2021 8:00 AMCSU CARES Provides Financial Relief for Students Experiencing Hardships Due to COVID-19Story
A group of students discussing something important
CSU CARES Provides Financial Relief for Students Experiencing Hardships Due to COVID-19
opening-the-floodgates.aspx
Checked Out To: Barrie, Matthewopening-the-floodgates.aspx
Checked Out To: Barrie, Matthew
  
11/8/202111/8/2021 8:00 AMCSU faculty, students and alumni are working on numerous solutions to the drought. Here are a few of the ways the CSU is keeping the state's glass half-full.CaliforniaStory
Opening the Floodgates
CSUCCESS-FALL-2021.aspx
  
11/3/202111/3/2021 10:45 AMLaunched in the fall, the CSUCCESS initiative is bridging the digital divide by providing free iPads to thousands of CSU students. And it’s only getting started.  Student SuccessStory
Man in white shirt hands a stack of new boxed computing devices to a female student inside a college administrative building.
Student Tech Equity Levels Up with CSUCCESS
CSU-Campuses-Earn-Seal-of-Excelencia-for-Accelerating-Latinx-Student-Success.aspx
  
11/2/202111/2/2021 11:10 AMFive of only 24 seals in the nation now belong to CSU institutions.DiversityStory
A person wearing a graduation cap and gown raising their arms in celebration
CSU Campuses Earn Seal of Excelencia for Accelerating Latinx Student Success
CSU-Campuses-Named-First-Ever-Fulbright-HSI-Leaders.aspx
  
11/2/202111/2/2021 8:35 AMNine CSU campuses recognized as Fulbright HSI Leaders for their commitment to fostering international exchange for students, staff of all backgrounds.InternationalStory
CSU Campuses Named Among First-Ever Fulbright HSI Leaders
Supporting-Student-Veterans-2021.aspx
  
11/1/202111/1/2021 2:25 PMThe CSU is dedicated to the success of students who served.VeteransStory
Supporting Student Veterans
Tapped-Out.aspx
Checked Out To: Barrie, MatthewTapped-Out.aspx
Checked Out To: Barrie, Matthew
  
11/1/202111/1/2021 8:00 AMFind our the many way drought affects California and its residents.   CaliforniaStory
Tapped Out
CAHSSA-Social-Sciences-grant-2021.aspx
  
10/25/202110/25/2021 9:45 AMCSU social scientists receive grant from National Science Foundation to build and broaden research and opportunities among minority-serving institutions. ResearchStory
professor speaks to students standing around a map during a research field trip
Expanding Reach of Social Sciences at Hispanic-Serving Institutions
in-a-dry-state.aspx
  
10/25/202110/25/2021 8:00 AMDrought: It’s one of California’s most persistent issues. CSU faculty, students and alumni are fervently working on solutions to mitigate the damage.Story
In a Dry State
troubled-waters.aspx
  
10/25/202110/25/2021 8:00 AMYou’ve heard the term drought, but what does it mean, who does it affect and how is it categorized?ResearchStory
Troubled Waters
a-smooth-transition.aspx
  
10/18/202110/18/2021 8:25 AMThe CSU is committed to supporting its transfer students from application to graduation.Transfer StudentStory
A Smooth Transition
CSU-Campuses-Receive-More-than-35-Million-to-Increase-Number-of-Latinx-Students-with-STEM-Degrees-.aspx
  
10/12/202110/12/2021 8:00 PMAs designated HSIs, CSU campuses will be developing programs to bridge the equity gap faced by Latinx and low-income students in STEM fields. STEMStory
CSU Campuses Receive More than $35 Million to Increase Number of Latinx Students with STEM Degrees
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