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1/31/2023 9:14 AMBeall, Alex1/30/20231/30/2023 10:00 AMHow the CSU is implementing equitable learning practices to help students overcome academic challenges on the road to graduation.Graduation InitiativeStory

Action for Equity: Equitable Learning Practices

How the CSU is implementing equitable learning practices to help students overcome academic challenges on the road to graduation.

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As Graduation Initiative 2025 remains a top priority for California State University leadership, the system has been working to implement the following efforts to eliminate graduation rate equity gaps and achieve GI2025's goals:

  • Reengage and reenroll underserved students
  • Expand credit opportunities with summer/intersession
  • Ensure equitable access to digital degree planners
  • Eliminate administrative barriers to graduation
  • Promote equitable learning practices and reduce DFW (D-F-Withdraw) rates

After delving into the first four priorities, this fifth installment in the series explores current ways the university is shifting classroom culture, offering professional development for instructors and addressing course structures to promote equitable learning practices and reduce DFW rates. ​To support similar efforts across the university system, campuses were invited to apply for funds, distributed in spring 2023, out of a one-time allocation of $3 million to address large enrollment courses that have low rates of first-time completion and large equity gaps in those rates.

“Addressing DFW rates is about being student-centered and being faculty-centered," says Michelle Hawley, Ph.D., associate vice president and dean of Undergraduate Studies at California State University, Los Angeles. “The keys to closing equity gaps are to create a sense of belonging, to make sure that every student feels seen and heard, feels like they can be successful, feels like the faculty members on the campus are there for them. And, the same holds true for the faculty members. If there is an equity gap, that needs to be addressed on an institutional level, and the faculty should not be in it alone."

Redesign for the Better

At Cal State LA, faculty have a range of opportunities in support of implementing equitable teaching to better serve students. The Center for Effective Teaching and Learning (CETL) in particular provides workshops, programs and professional development in this area. The Critical Course Redesign for Equity and Student Success program—a combined effort between CETL and the Center for Academic Success (CAS)—is especially aimed at improving student outcomes in the most foundational classes.

“The course redesign initiatives give us an opportunity to be intentional and to focus our efforts, our funding and our conversations on what takes place in the classroom," Dr. Hawley says. “It gives us an opportunity to come together as a campus around those experiences that are most critical to what we do: teaching and learning. … It's about how we all come together to create a sense of belonging and support one another."

With a focus on multi-section gateway courses, the program works with faculty to redesign challenging courses taken early in the college career to ensure the classes meet students' academic and social needs and are culturally responsive. Courses are first nominated by their colleges after a GI2025 progress review, and faculty can choose to opt into the redesign process. CETL helps with initial redesign efforts through a syllabus review, faculty workshops, analysis of course-specific equity data and a survey of students who previously completed the course. If needed, instructional designers run a Design Your Course Blueprint boot camp for faculty to restructure the course and syllabus.

“We're looking for alignment between student learning outcomes, activities and measurable criteria to have change that is transformative," CETL Executive Director Catherine Haras says.

CAS then helps build in additional support including academic assistance for students like tutoring, faculty development support and regular student outreach with the goal of creating a sense of belonging among both students and instructors.

“Students come into the classroom with different experiences, and [our efforts] allow faculty to identify and quickly bring in students to get them connected in ways that are non-stigmatizing, that are asset-based and speak to their realities," CAS Executive Director Andrew Long says. “We've completely and utterly demystified the academic support in the messaging that takes place with faculty and with everyone involved in this so that this is a standard part of the student experience."

Michael Joseph "Developing [a general structure] to deploy the course both in lecture and labs helped create course coordination and helped students get consistent instruction." —Dr. Michael Joseph

One such effort was the redesign of the Anatomical Kinesiology course to address both the class's high DFW rates and those of the prerequisite course, Anatomy and Physiology, which had about a 67 percent DFW rate among kinesiology majors. The non-passing rates in the latter created a bottleneck in the early kinesiology courses, leading the team to develop a new syllabus and structure for Anatomical Kinesiology that would allow the class to fulfill the same prerequisite requirement as Anatomy and Physiology.

“Our goal was to create a course and curriculum to prepare our students to successfully matriculate through our kinesiology upper division courses, thus ultimately improving graduation rates," says Michael Selvan Joseph, Ph.D., assistant professor in the School of Kinesiology​ and faculty redesign lead. “We intentionally redesigned our course content to be scaffolded to help the student absorb difficult content at all levels of their development."

The redesign process involved working with upper division course faculty to ensure course content successfully prepared students for future classes; developing a general course structure for faculty to follow; and establishing meetings to coordinate learning objectives and track student progress. Preliminary data has shown a decrease in the course's DFW rates.

Dr. Joseph will use the same techniques to redesign an upper division kinesiology course as well—which the CETL and CAS teams have found to be the case for many faculty who complete the redesign process.

“It's about an improved course, it's about an improved experience, but it's ultimately about culture change," Hawley says. “Something that is successful is going to build a community that is going to continue to become stronger, that's going to learn, that's going to have a process of ongoing improvement, and then is going to have opportunities to reflect and want to improve the course further."

Try, Try Again

The Summer Boost Program at California State University, Chico, held for the first time in summer 2022, serves the dual purpose of expanding credit opportunities for students and reducing DFW rates by offering students a second chance at a course.

When creating the Summer Boost schedule, the team identified courses with high DFW rates and equity gaps that showed better pass rates during the summer and made those available for free to students who had completed fewer than 45 units, had a non-passing grade in the previous three semesters and had financial need. Faculty were encouraged to use equity-minded pedagogies and to adopt low- and no-cost course materials.

“The overarching plan was to focus on the first year because all our data showed that that's where the big impact is in retention," says Kate McCarthy, Ph.D., dean of Undergraduate Education. “We saw it as a chance for first year students who might be discouraged by that early DFW to have a quick do-over."

Ultimately, the program offered eight general education courses that have historically been challenging for students, with 171 enrollments—137 individual students—and a pass rate of 77 percent and a retention rate of 84 percent. The team will be running the program in future summers, but will analyze the data to learn how to further improve these outcomes.

Lisa Kendhammer "Not only was it an opportunity for students to retake this course, but it also allowed me to try different things with the course to help boost student understanding." —Dr. Lisa Kendhammer

“Sometimes, a student needs to retake one class and then their whole graduation plan is thrown off," says Lisa Kendhammer, Ph.D., associate professor of chemical education. “The Summer Boost program gave students the opportunity to get back on track and graduate in a timely manner."

Dr. Kendhammer taught the General Chemistry course during the 2022 Summer Boost, a condensed version of the class which involved four hours of combined lecture and lab Monday through Thursday. To encourage learning and help students keep pace, she incorporated outdoor activities and regular 'Brain Breaks.'

“The students were able to not only have more personalized attention, but they also were able to devote more time to learning the material for just this one course," Kendhammer says. “This not only helped students to get back on track, but they were able to successfully pass the course. I think showing students that we are invested in their future and giving them the opportunity to participate in programs like Summer Boost will show them how much the faculty cares about them and their success."

The Summer Boost program falls under Chico State's Advancing Equity Project, the university's most recent iteration of GI2025, and is the launching point for the new Critical Success Course Model being piloted this spring to target classes with high DFW rates. Through that effort, two of the courses offered in Summer Boost will be holistically reimagined with the help of an assigned course coordinator, course assessments and professional development. All faculty involved with the course will participate in a faculty learning community and will agree to an implementation plan to address issues like student outreach, culturally competent content, students' sense of belonging and access to course materials.

“This is something I hope will become institutionalized on our campus for critical success courses or critical gateway courses, and it will be understood that elite faculty teach these classes," Dr. McCarthy says.

Looking at the Grade Book

While campuses are offering formalized training and programs to improve equitable learning practices, faculty are also leading efforts toward improved student outcomes.

Cassandra Paul "We are building compassion into the system. Being able to attempt the same problem multiple times normalizes struggle with learning new material. It also allows students to iterate on their own work, and they feel like they understand more after they finish the problem." —Dr. Cassandra Paul

Cassandra Paul, Ph.D., associate professor of physics and astronomy and the graduate coordinator of the Science Education Program at San José State University, has dedicated much study to equitable grading practices with both the CSU and the University of California systems​.

“Grading is the most important part of the process because it's what goes into creating the final grade and it's what determines whether or not students are able to move on in their courses," Dr. Paul says. “Equitable grading practices are the first thing we should be looking at when we're trying to increase retention. … The idea should be that equity is achievable, that students’ grades should not be predictable based on their demographics."

Paul's work is built on the course deficient concept, which argues that equity gaps are the result of problems with the course, not deficiencies among the students.

“There are all these things built into the system like systematic sexism and systematic racism," she says. “We need to think about how we're going to change our structures in order to erase those structural barriers that exist. It's not that we have to catch students up; there's nothing wrong with the students. We have to think about how our coursework can better serve the population we have."

Based on her years of testing various grading options to achieve more equitable outcomes, Paul implements and recommends other faculty adopt these five grading practices:

​1. Ungrading: While there are multiple ways to use ungrading, Paul utilizes the technique in her small classes by marking all assignments incomplete or complete. Incomplete assignments are returned with extensive feedback, and students are given the opportunity to improve the work to meet assignment criteria. The final grade depends on the number of assignments marked complete.

2. 4.0 Scale: Paul's research found that switching to a 4.0 grading scale, which aligns with the GPA scale and assigns a numeric value to a letter grade (e.g. 4 equals an A), reduces equity gaps across ethnic and racial demographics by 20 percent.

3. Minimum Grading: In this practice, faculty continue using the traditional percentage scale, but 50 percent is the lowest grade given. Doing so aligns the percentage scale with the 4.0 scale and works more easily with learning management programs like Canvas that only rely on the percentage system.

4. Milestone Problem Situation: Based on mastery grading, Paul and her colleagues developed this strategy for their large introduction courses during the first semester of the pandemic. This strategy allows students to attempt a problem three times with feedback following each attempt. Their grade is based on how many correct solutions they achieve after those three tries.

​5. Grading by Response Category: Applicable to large classes, this final practice groups students based on the area in which they need further instruction. Students receive feedback based on their most prominent error, so that they know where to focus their efforts on the next assessment. This practice can be coupled with the 4.0 scale or minimum grading.

Support from the Top

At the university-wide level, the CSU has been helping its campuses implement equitable learning practices through the CSU Certificate Program in Student Success Analytics. An integral part of GI2025, the certificate program provides professional development opportunities for faculty, staff and administrators to understand the factors that perpetuate equity gaps in higher education.

Since its inception, the program has served more than 600 individuals both within and outside the CSU system. The curriculum utilizes guest speakers and CSU student success data to spur collaborative efforts for how to improve the educational outcomes of college students.

Program participants facing a laptop computer, one student has a stylis pen in her hand pointing to the screen “There was certainly a profoundly empowering aspect that having access to this data gave me in terms of my own courses, interacting with other faculty, doing program review and within other contexts.” —Dr. Nielan Barnes, Cal State Long Beach professor of sociology, department chair and 2021 program participant

“We leverage the data by addressing equity and student success in a holistic manner," Cynthia Alvarez, Ph.D., assistant director of Student Success at the CSU Office of the Chancellor and program co-lead, said in a previous article. “This process helps our learning community think through what it means to make changes on campus to benefit students, especially historically marginalized students, all while spurring new goals and innovative ideas to serve their campus as a whole."



 Read the Action for Equity series' first four installments on reenrollment efforts, digital degree planners, removing administrative barriers and expanding credit opportunities.


Action for Equity: Equitable Learning Practices
CSU-Continues-to-Provide-the-Most-Affordable-Higher-Education-in-the-Nation.aspx
  
1/25/2023 3:38 PMThropay, Janessa1/25/20231/25/2023 3:40 PMWith the country’s lowest tuition and fees, CSU institutions provide a proven path toward upward mobility.AffordabilityPress Release

Staff from the California State University (CSU) Chancellor's Office today presented CSU Trustees with the university system's annual student fee report. Data from the report once again demonstrates that the CSU's annual undergraduate and graduate resident tuition and fees are lower than those of peer comparison institutions across the country.

“The CSU continues to be a national leader in providing a high-quality education at an unmatched value," said CSU Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester. “A college degree is increasingly important in today's society, and the CSU's value proposition empowers students to achieve their dreams of pursuing higher education and – in turn – transforming their lives and those of their families, as they elevate their communities."

The data was presented during the January 2023 CSU Board of Trustees meeting and compared the CSU's systemwide tuition plus average campus-based mandatory fees against 15 public peer comparison institutions from across the nation.

With just one tuition increase in the last 11 years, CSU's annual tuition for an undergraduate resident student checks in at just $5,742. When including the average for campus-based fees, that total moves to $7,520, which is nearly $1,300 less than the next university from the comparison group. Additional data points demonstrate the CSU's commitment to affordability:

  • Thanks to robust financial aid, more than 387,600—or 81 percent—of all CSU students received financial assistance.
  • Nearly 61 percent of all undergraduate students do not pay tuition as it is fully covered through financial aid.
  • 2020-21 CSU bachelor's degree recipients who did accrue loan debt had lower average debt ($17,966) than the state average ($21,125), and far lower than the national average ($28,950).

Providing Californians with access to a high-quality, transformative education remains a priority for the university. Year after year, the CSU and its 23 universities have ensured that individuals from every socioeconomic background are able to obtain a college degree at an affordable price. In fact, eight of the 23 CSU campuses recently earned top honors for graduating more economically disadvantaged students at lower tuition into well-paying jobs—with California State University San Marcos occupying the top spot. In total, CSU campuses claim four of the top 10 and eight of the top 20 spots in CollegeNET's 2022 Social Mobility index rankings.



About the California State University

The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, nearly 460,000 students, and 56,000 faculty and staff. Nearly 40 percent of the CSU's undergraduate students transfer from California Community Colleges. The CSU was created in 1960 with a mission of providing high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 132,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Student shakes hands with faculty member at graduation
CSU Continues to Provide the Most Affordable Higher Education in the Nation
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1/24/2023 1:00 PMThropay, Janessa1/24/20231/24/2023 1:00 PMWang Family Excellence Awards honor exceptional contributions in teaching, scholarship and service to CSU students.FacultyPress Release

The California State University (CSU) will honor four faculty and one staff member with the esteemed Wang Family Excellence Award ​for their unwavering commitment to student achievement and advancing the CSU mission through excellence in teaching, scholarship and service. As part of their recognition, each honoree will receive a $20,000 award that is provided through a gift from CSU Trustee Emeritus Stanley T. Wang and administered through the CSU Foundation.

Honorees will be recognized publicly Tuesday, January 24, during the CSU Board of Trustees meeting in Long Beach, California.

​“As we emerge from the pandemic, it is my great honor to confer the 2023 Wang Family Excellence Award to five extraordinary individuals who are connecting students with transformational opportunities to grow, contribute and lead in our communities," said CSU Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester. “We extend our enduring appreciation to Trustee Emeritus Stanley Wang and his family for their unparalleled generosity and for continuing to nurture a world of connection."

Introduced in 1998, the Wang Family Excellence Awards recognize CSU faculty members who have distinguished themselves through high-quality teaching and excellence in their area of expertise. The awards also acknowledge a staff member whose contributions go above and beyond expectations.

The five honorees are:

 

Steve Alas, Ph.D., Cal Poly Pomona (Professor of Biology, Director of SEES), Outstanding Faculty Service

A tumor immunologist with expertise in genetics and DNA repair and a former research fellow at City of Hope National Medical Center, Dr. Steve Alas' impact on human lives extends far beyond his research lab. The veteran biologist has provided extraordinary service and opportunities to thousands of students at his alma mater, Cal Poly Pomona, while diversifying the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields and connecting California's industries with invaluable untapped talent.

Dr. Alas first joined the university as an assistant professor in 2005. Today, as director of CPP's Science Educational Enhancement Services (SEES), he works tirelessly to eliminate barriers for underrepresented and first-generation students in the fields of science and engineering, serving more than 700 students each year. While establishing a community of peers, SEES provides students with professional development, peer mentoring, academic support, referrals to fellowships and scholarships and summer orientation for incoming freshmen, among many other services. His efforts have helped narrow the graduation gap for participating underrepresented students from 17.6 percent to 3.9 percent.

Described by CPP President Soraya Coley as “the epitome of a teacher-scholar-mentor-leader," Dr. Alas has received the Provost's Award for Excellence in Service, as well as the CSU Faculty Innovation and Leadership Award (FILA). He holds a bachelor's degree in biological sciences from CPP and a Ph.D. in microbiology and immunology from the University of California, Los Angeles.

 

David Blekhman, Ph.D., Cal State LA (Professor of Technology, Technical Director of Hydrogen Research and Fueling Facility), Outstanding Faculty Scholarship

Tapped by Cal State LA to expand its green portfolio by developing the largest hydrogen and fuel-cell research facility at any academic campus in the United States, Dr. David Blekhman jumped at the opportunity. When the Cal State LA Hydrogen Research and Fueling Facility opened in 2014, the engineering technology professor was named its technical director. The station was the first in the world to be certified to sell hydrogen by the kilogram directly to drivers, and it has hosted more than 10,000 students and industry professionals.

Beyond his vision for clear skies and a green and healthy planet, the alternative energy expert is intent on creating a world where his diverse and talented students are prized as highly skilled practitioners, with a direct hand in advancing sustainable policies and technical solutions for California's top research firms, businesses and government agencies. To achieve this goal, Dr. Blekhman actively develops cutting-edge courses in electric and hybrid vehicles, fuel cell applications, photovoltaics, advanced engine design and other in-demand fields, leading students to explore real-world problems and their solutions through hands-on projects, guest presentations, industry tours and attendance at local conferences. Instrumental in introducing electric vehicle charging infrastructure and solar energy projects to Cal State LA, he now employs the campus as a “living laboratory" to enhance students' learning and professional development.

An internationally renowned author and presenter, Dr. Blekhman holds bachelor's and master's degrees in thermal physics and engineering from St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University in Russia, as well as a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of Buffalo in New York.

 

William (Bill) J. Hoese, Ph.D., Cal State Fullerton (Professor of Biological Sciences), Outstanding Faculty Innovator for Student Success

“I allow students the freedom to learn, permission to fail, space to strive, opportunities to take risks and support to succeed. I use field experiences to take students out of their comfort zones, build community and encourage curiosity about the world around us."

Revered at Cal State Fullerton as “a creative, effective and rigorous classroom instructor who is universally loved, praised and admired," Dr. William (Bill) Hoese has distinguished himself as an exceptional educator with a gift for inspiring students to delve into life science.

A 23-year veteran at CSUF, Dr. Hoese has been nationally recognized for his efforts to transform the way biology is taught, from a fact-driven course to one that engages students in active learning and critical thinking. As just one example, Dr. Hoese has introduced 300-plus lower-division biology students each semester to Southern California's ecosystems with an overnight trip to the Mojave Desert where—away from city lights—many reported seeing stars for the first time. His approach led to “Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education," a movement spearheaded by the American Association for the Advancement of Science with support from the National Science Foundation, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, the National Institutes of Health and the United States Department of Agriculture.

Dr. Hoese has also designed multiple programs that increase student success beyond his classroom.

Dr. Hoese holds a bachelor's degree in human biology from Stanford University, a master's degree in biology from Stanford and a Ph.D. in zoology from Duke University.

 

Alyssa Goldstein Sepinwall, Ph.D., CSU San Marcos (History Professor and Graduate Coordinator), Outstanding Faculty Teaching

Various pundits are credited with issuing the warning, “Those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it." CSU San Marcos history professor Dr. Alyssa Goldstein Sepinwall is determined to steer her students clear of that fateful path and instead give them a full picture and visceral connections with the people, events and challenges of our past.

Dr. Sepinwall joined CSUSM in 1999 and was promoted to full professor in 2011. As a past winner of CSUSM's President's Award for Innovation in Teaching and the Harry E. Brakebill Outstanding Professor Award, she specializes in showing students how history connects to their own lives through compelling and hands-on projects, first-hand accounts such as diaries, whole-class and small-group discussion and diverse guest speakers. Her creative assignments, such as a cookoff exploring changes in eating habits for a women and Jewish history class, not only create community within the classroom, but they also allow students to see themselves in historical narratives. Her cutting-edge teaching is continuously informed by feedback from her students, and their questions shape her research.
With a busy schedule that includes serving on university and department committees, advising graduate theses and conducting research, she has become a sought-after expert in Haitian and French history, slavery and colonization and the history of gender, as well as visual and pop cultures. Widely quoted in national media, she is also a frequent speaker and guest lecturer at the CSU and around the world.

Dr. Sepinwall holds bachelor's degrees in history and political science from the University of Pennsylvania, and a master's degree and Ph.D. in history from Stanford University.

 

Joy Stewart-James, Ed.D., Sacramento State (AVP, Student Health & Counseling Services), Outstanding Staff Performance

After a 20-year career working for a large hospital health care system in Austin, Texas, overseeing several clinics and departments, Dr. Joy Stewart-James made the leap to higher education in 2007, landing on her feet at Sacramento State​. Since then, the seasoned public health professional has been widely credited with keeping the Sacramento State community safe, healthy and calm, even as the campus navigated the global COVID-19 public health crisis. She has become a recognized leader not only within the CSU system, but across the state and national college health communities.
After joining Sacramento State as executive director for Student Health and Counseling Services, Dr. Stewart-James was promoted to associate vice president in 2017. In her current role, she provides strategic leadership, management, fiscal oversight and programmatic direction for a comprehensive model of health and wellness for a campus of over 30,000 students. She oversees and manages Sacramento State's fully accredited, multidisciplinary health care services, including urgent and primary care, mental health counseling services, pharmacy, radiology, nutrition, athletic training, sports medicine, health promotion services, basic needs, case management and student peer education programs.

She has dedicated herself to improving the patient experience and helping students to become better health care consumers. With a new paperless system that allows students to access appointments, view records and message their providers via their patient portal, use of the student health center has increased dramatically.
Dr. Stewart-James holds a bachelor's degree from Florida International University in Miami, a master's degree from the University of Oregon, Eugene and an Ed.D. from the University of Texas at Austin.


Excellence in teaching and a dedication to student success from faculty and staff as demonstrated by the 2023 Wang Family Excellence awardees further supports the CSU's Graduation Initiative 2025. This key initiative is focused on increasing graduation rates for all CSU students while eliminating equity gaps and meeting California's workforce needs.

For more information on the awardees and their accomplishments, visit the Wang Family Excellence Award website.



About the California State University

The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, nearly 460,000 students, and 56,000 faculty and staff. Nearly 40 percent of the CSU's undergraduate students transfer from California Community Colleges. The CSU was created in 1960 with a mission of providing high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 132,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

headshots of five people winning an award
CSU Faculty and Staff Honored for Dedication to Student Success
CSU-Workforce-Partnerships.aspx
  
1/23/2023 10:40 AMRuble, Alisia1/23/20231/23/2023 9:00 AMCompanies like Amazon, Disney and Stater Bros. partner with the CSU to upskill employees and provide an affordable pathway to earning a bachelor's degree.AccessStory

When companies want to invest in their employees' education, they turn to the CSU because it's the best value in higher education. At only $5,742 per academic year, CSU tuition is among the lowest in the country and has not risen in more than a decade in keeping with the university's commitment to making college affordable for all.

The CSU works with industry partners to help employees advance their careers and foster a more educated workforce for California's economy. Read about a few of these partnerships.

Amazon Education Partners

Amazon's Career Choice program provides education and training opportunities that include full college tuition, industry certifications and foundational skills, such as English language, high school diplomas​ and GEDs. Full- and part-time Amazon employees who have worked for at least 90 days are eligible.

The e-commerce company has chosen several CSU campuses to be education partners and serve regions in which the company operates: Channel Islands, Fresno, Pomona, San Diego, San Josè and Stanislaus.

“[Earning a degree] may be the difference between employees being in a warehouse position versus a higher-paying managerial position, so it could have tremendous benefits—life changing in some ways," says Ron Rogers, Ph.D., San Josè State interim vice provost for academic innovation and online initiatives​. “Career Choice provides them mobility within their careers, which will ultimately contribute to their social mobility."

The program also provides employees with the opportunity to explore other career options at Amazon like communications and marketing, software development and more. Students receive a quality education from the university as well as strong academic and career advising.​photo of mischelle martinez Stanislaus State student and Amazon employee Mischelle Martin​ez. Photo credit: Stanislaus State

As a Career Choice education partner, San Diego State University Global Campus, for example, provides access to a range​​ of SDSU degree-completion programs offered fully online or hybrid with some in-person components, giving students flexibility in how, when ​and where they learn.

“We were very excited when Amazon reached out to us to be their first Career Choice partner in the San Diego region," Casey Rothenberger, executive director of academic and professional programs for SDSU Global Campus, says in a press release. “This partnership allows SDSU and Amazon to provide increased access to a bachelor's degree for the thousands of Amazon employees in our region."​

For Mischelle Martinez, a Stanislaus State business major who transferred from Modesto Junior College ​last spring, learning that Career Choice is available to her was a pleasant surprise.

"I was transferring in and found out that I qualified for this program, so I decided to definitely take advantage of it," says Martinez, who works 30 hours a week as an Amazon packer while taking a full load of classes. “It is a big help because it covers all of my educational costs." 

A Patterson resident and mother of two small children, Martinez says she chose to attend Stan State for its business programs and proximity to Patterson, which allows her to save money by living at home and commuting. She is considering a human resources track and plans to graduate with a bachelor's degree in spring 2023. 

'Cal State Disneyland'

Last summer, Cal State Fullerton joined ​Disney Aspire, The Walt Disney Company's education investment and career development program that offers 100 percent tuition paid upfront for hourly employees.​

Dozens of CSUF programs will be available starting spring 2023 to more than 29,500 hourly employees eligible to participate in Disney Aspire in California, more than 3,400 of whom are already enrolled at the university.

“It's always been a little joke that CSUF is called 'Cal State Disneyland' because so many Disney cast members also attend or graduated from Cal State Fullerton, so this is a natural fit," says Elva Rubalcava, CSUF associate vice president of government and community relations. “Disney also recognizes that CSUF has an incredible impact on Orange County's economy. In fact, nearly 80 percent of our more than 310,000 alumni have stayed within a 50-mile radius of campus."

In addition to covering tuition, Disney will also reimburse employees for applicable books and fees. Employees will have access to a variety of in-person and online courses at CSUF, located about seven miles from the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim.

CSUF joins Disney Aspire as the program's first four-year brick-and-mortar university, as all previously established educational opportunities are through online universities and programs. This will allow local employees the chance to engage in an on-campus college student experience.

Serving Working Adults

Cal State San Bernardino has established the Stater Bros. Market​ completion program to help employees advance their careers. Through this partnership, the grocery chain can​ provide a significant educational opportunity to its employees to earn a Bachelor of Arts in administration through the Jack H. Brown College of Business and Public Administration (JHBC).

“Stater Bros. has provided startup funding for the program and is promoting the program among its own employees," JHBC Dean Tomás Gómez-Arias, Ph.D., says. “As part of our agreement with Stater Bros., their employees get a 15 percent tuition discount and Stater Bros. provides an additional 15 percent tuition reimbursement."

The program resembles the curriculum of CSUSB's regular Bachelor of Arts in Administration program but is offered fully online in a more flexible modality with eight-week courses. It is designed for students who have taken their lower division courses at community colleges or other institutions and can complete the program in 60 units.

“Being fully online and asynchronous, it fits with people's schedules," Dr. Gómez-Arias says. “The short course format allows students to progress towards their degree in predictable chunks that accommodate​ changes in people's life demands."

The partnership will also have a major impact in providing access to a high-quality educational program and opportunities to increase the college attainment rates of Inland Empire residents. The inland region has a population of 4.5 million residents, but less than 20 percent of the residents have a bachelor's degree.


Learn more about these programs by visiting the Amazon Career Choice, Disney Aspire​ and CSUSB Jack H. Brown College​ websites.


The value of a California State University​ degree is unmatched. We offer an affordable, high-quality education taught by world-class faculty members along with strong career advising and hands-on experiences that ensure graduates are job-ready and highly desired by employers. The university works with industry professionals to ensure our more than 4,100 degree programs are relevant to California's workforce needs. Earning a CSU degree has the potential to change the trajectory of students' lives, as well as the lives of their family members, by opening doors to opportunities for upward mobility.

Learn about applying to the CSU.

college students and mickey mouse wearing a graduation gown at disneyland
Educating California's Workforce
Statement-on-Pending-Retirement-of-Cal-State-Fullerton-President-Virjee.aspx
  
1/23/2023 9:11 AMThropay, Janessa1/23/20231/23/2023 7:40 AMWhile president of California State University, Fullerton and throughout his service as general counsel for the CSU, Fram Virjee has been the epitome of a servant leader, displaying an infectious passion to improve opportunities for students.​​​LeadershipPress Release

The following statement can be attributed to CSU Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester:

“While president of California State University, Fullerton (CSUF) and throughout his service as general counsel for the California State University (CSU), Fram Virjee has been the epitome of a servant leader, displaying an infectious passion to improve opportunities for students.​​​

An extraordinarily successful attorney, Fram came to the position of university president from a nontraditional background, but as both an immigrant and a first-generation college graduate, he strongly identified with the CSU mission. Throughout his presidency, he has been laser-focused on expanding access and success for students from all backgrounds.

Today, CSUF has the largest enrollment of any university in the CSU system, serving nearly 40,000 students. More importantly, those students are earning degrees like never before, with the university boasting all-time high graduation rates across multiple measures.

Significantly, many of these graduates are women or people of color. Cal State Fullerton confers more baccalaureate degrees on women or Latinx students than any other institution in California.

We are forever thankful for Fram's dedication, leadership and remarkable contributions to the CSU."

 

On January 23, 2023, CSUF President Framroze Virjee announced that he would retire from his role on July 31, 2023.

An interim president will be appointed to lead the university, and the CSU will launch a national search to identify Virjee's successor. Under university policy, the chair of the CSU Board of Trustees, Wenda Fong and Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester will select a committee comprised of campus and community stakeholders who will be publicly announced at a later date. Thereafter, campus and community input will be sought in an open forum held on the CSUF campus.



About the California State University

The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, nearly 460,000 students, and 56,000 faculty and staff. Nearly 40 percent of the CSU's undergraduate students transfer from California Community Colleges. The CSU was created in 1960 with a mission of providing high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 132,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.​

Cal State Fullerton President Virjee speaking at graduation ceremony
Statement on Pending Retirement of California State University, Fullerton President Framroze Virjee
Chico-State-Presidential-Search-Committee-to-Hold-Open-Forum.aspx
  
1/20/2023 9:35 AMThropay, Janessa1/20/20231/20/2023 9:20 AMThe California State University Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of California State University, Chico to succeed Gayle E.  Hutchinson, Ph.D., who will retire as campus president at the end of the 2022-23 academic year.LeadershipPress Release

The California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of California State University, Chico to succeed Gayle E.  Hutchinson, Ph.D., who will retire as campus president at the end of the 2022-23 academic year.

The first meeting of the Trustees' Committee for the Selection of the President will be held in a hybrid in-person/virtual open forum from 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 2 in the Bell Memorial Union Auditorium on campus. During this time, the committee will outline the search process and the community will be invited to share their preferred attributes of the next president of Chico State. Please note that campus and community members wishing to address the committee through the virtual option are required to register in advance. The deadline to register to speak during the open forum is Wednesday, Feb. 1 at 5:00 p.m. Confirmed registrants will receive details about how to participate.

CSU Trustee Lillian Kimbell will chair the committee. The other trustee members include Doug Faigin, Yammilette Rodriguez and Jose Antonio Vargas, as well as Trustee Chair Wenda Fong and CSU Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester.

The virtual open forum will be web-streamed live and archived on the President Search website, where individuals may also provide their input via written submission.

Board policy requires the chair of the CSU trustees to appoint an Advisory Committee to the Trustees' Committee. The Advisory Committee is composed of representatives from the faculty, staff, students and alumni, as well as a member of a campus advisory board, all of whom are selected by the campus's constituency groups. Also on the Advisory Committee is a vice president or academic dean from the campus, and a president of another CSU campus—both selected by the chancellor. Both committees function as one unified group.​

Members of the Advisory Committee for the Selection of the President include:​

  • Holly Nevarez, Ph.D., professor, Department of Public Health & Health Services Administration, and Jaime Raigoza, Ph.D., associate professor, Computer Science Department (faculty representatives)
  • Marianne Paiva, Ph.D., chair, Academic Senate
  • Tasha Alexander, coordinator and advisor (staff representative)
  • Krystal Alvarez and Mutjaba Azam (student representatives)
  • Darryl Schoen (alumni representative)
  • David Hodson (campus advisory board representative)
  • Monique Sendze, Ed.D., vice president for information technology and chief information officer (administration representative)
  • Matthews Jackson and Dennis Ramirez (community representatives)
  • Adela de la Torre, Ph.D., president, San Diego State University

Over the next several months, the committee will review candidates and conduct interviews.



About the California State University

The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, nearly 460,000 students, and 56,000 faculty and staff. Nearly 40 percent of the CSU's undergraduate students transfer from California Community Colleges. The CSU was created in 1960 with a mission of providing high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 132,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

California State University, Chico campus building
California State University, Chico Presidential Search Committee to Hold Open Forum
Sacramento-State-Presidential-Search-Committee-to-Hold-Open-Forum.aspx
  
1/19/2023 12:37 PMThropay, Janessa1/19/20231/19/2023 10:25 AM​The California State University Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of California State University, Sacramento to succeed Robert S.  Nelsen, Ph.D., who will retire as campus president at the end of the 2022-23 academic year.LeadershipPress Release

The California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of California State University, Sacramento to succeed Robert S.  Nelsen, Ph.D., who will retire as campus president at the end of the 2022-23 academic year.

The first meeting of the Trustees' Committee for the Selection of the President will be held in a hybrid in-person/virtual open forum from 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 3 in the University Union Ballroom on campus. During this time, the committee will outline the search process and the community will be invited to share their preferred attributes of the next president of Sacramento State. Please note that campus and community members wishing to address the committee through the virtual option are required to register in advance. The deadline to register to speak during the open forum is Thursday, February 2 at 5:00 p.m. Confirmed registrants will receive details about how to participate.

CSU Trustee Diego Arambula will chair the committee. The other trustee members include Maria Linares, Jack McGrory and Lateefah Simon, as well as Trustee Chair Wenda Fong and CSU Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester.

The virtual open forum will be web-streamed live and archived on the President Search website, where individuals may also provide their input via written submission.

Board policy requires the chair of the CSU trustees to appoint an Advisory Committee to the Trustees' Committee. The Advisory Committee is composed of representatives from the faculty, staff, students and alumni, as well as a member of a campus advisory board, all of whom are selected by the campus's constituency groups. Also on the Advisory Committee is a vice president or academic dean from the campus, and a president of another CSU campus—both selected by the chancellor. Both committees function as one unified group.

Members of the Advisory Committee for the Selection of the President include:

  • Shawna Malvini Redden, Ph.D., associate professor; graduate coordinator, Department of Communication Studies, and Ann Moylan, Ph.D., director, Community Engagement Center and professor, Family Studies and Human Development (faculty representatives)
  • Adam Rechs, Ph.D., chair, Faculty Senate
  • Michael Hendren (staff representative)
  • Azriel Nicdao and Salma Pacheco (student representatives)
  • Colette Harris-Mathews, Ed.D. (alumni representative)
  • Holly Tiche (campus advisory board representative)
  • Lisa Cardoza, Ed.D., vice president for university advancement (administration representative)
  • Paul Lau and Alice Perez (community representatives)
  • Erika Beck, Ph.D., president, California State University, Northridge

Over the next several months, the committee will review candidates and conduct interviews.



About the California State University

The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, nearly 460,000 students, and 56,000 faculty and staff. Nearly 40 percent of the CSU's undergraduate students transfer from California Community Colleges. The CSU was created in 1960 with a mission of providing high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 132,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.​

Sacramento State University Sign on Campus
California State University, Sacramento Presidential Search Committee to Hold Open Forum
Statement-on-Pending-Retirement-of-Stanislaus-State-President-Junn.aspx
  
1/18/2023 11:59 AMThropay, Janessa1/18/20231/18/2023 10:45 AM"Many thousands of students have benefitted from Dr. Junn’s wise leadership, and I thank her for her numerous and extraordinary contributions over the course of her nearly four-decade career with the California State University."LeadershipPress Release

​The following statement can be attributed to CSU Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester:

“Over the course of her 37-year career with the California State University, Dr. Ellen Junn has been a steadfast champion of improving the social mobility of Californians across the state, having served in consequential roles at our universities in San Bernardino, Fullerton, Fresno, San José, Dominguez Hills and Stanislaus.

Thanks to her efforts as president of Stanislaus State, students in the Central Valley now have greater access to the life-transforming power of a Cal State degree. Significant enhancements made to the Stanislaus State Stockton Campus under her leadership will lead to even greater opportunity.

She has also demonstrated a commitment to inclusive excellence and has worked tirelessly to expand diversity and inclusion on campus. As the nation's first Korean-American woman to serve as the president of a four-year public institution, Dr. Junn is also a trailblazer and an inspiration to many, having demonstrated that women of color can reach the highest levels of academia.

Many thousands of students have benefitted from Dr. Junn’s wise leadership, and I thank her for her numerous and extraordinary contributions over the course of her nearly four-decade career with the California State University.​"

 

On January 18, 2023, Stanislaus State President Ellen Junn announced that she would retire from her role at the end of the 2022-23 academic year.

An interim president will be appointed to lead the university, and the CSU will launch a national search to identify Junn's successor. Under university policy, the chair of the CSU Board of Trustees, Wenda Fong, and Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester will select a committee comprised of campus and community stakeholders who will be publicly announced at a later date. Thereafter, campus and community input will be sought in an open forum held on the Stan State campus.



About the California State University

The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, nearly 460,000 students, and 56,000 faculty and staff. Nearly 40 percent of the CSU's undergraduate students transfer from California Community Colleges. The CSU was created in 1960 with a mission of providing high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 132,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Stanislaus State President Ellen Junn speaking at graduation ceremony
Statement on Pending Retirement of California State University, Stanislaus President Ellen Junn
CSU-Chancellor-Search-Committee-Members-and-Schedule-of-Open-Forums-Announced.aspx
  
1/23/2023 12:54 PMRawls, Aaron1/11/20231/11/2023 11:20 AMAs part of the comprehensive and inclusive process of selecting the next Chancellor, the CSU has finalized the members of the Implementation and Assessment Committees and the schedule for the open forums.ChancellorPress Release

As part of the comprehensive and inclusive process that will guide the national search to identify and appoint the next California State University (CSU) Chancellor, the CSU has finalized the members of the Implementation and Assessment Committees and the schedule for the open forums.

Two committees have been appointed to work collaboratively throughout the search:


Implementation Committee for the Selection of the Chancellor

The Chair of the CSU Board of Trustees appoints an Implementation Committee to guide the process for the selection of the chancellor. The Implementation Committee is comprised of eight members representing a broad cross-section of university constituencies, including:

  • Wenda Fong, Chair of the Board and Implementation Committee Chair
  • Jack Clarke, Jr., Vice Chair of the Board
  • Julia Lopez, Trustee
  • Jack McGrory, Trustee
  • Yammilette Rodriguez, Trustee
  • Jolene Koester, Interim Chancellor
  • Robert Keith Collins, immediate past chair, Academic Senate CSU and professor, San Francisco State University (faculty representative)
  • Krishan Malhotra, president, Cal State Student Association and student, California State University, Stanislaus (student representative)

Assessment Committee for the Selection of the Chancellor

An Assessment Committee will work in parallel with the Implementation Committee throughout the search process. The Assessment Committee is comprised of the following 12 members representing key stakeholder groups:

  • Larry Adamson, Alumni Trustee and Assessment Committee Chair
  • Diana Aguilar-Cruz, Student Trustee
  • Romey Sabalius, Faculty Trustee
  • Jean Picker Firstenberg, Trustee
  • Beth Steffel, chair, Academic Senate CSU and professor, California State University, San Bernardino (faculty representative)
  • Dixie Samaniego, vice president of systemwide affairs, Cal State Student Association and student, California State University, Fullerton (student representative)
  • Timothy Chambers, facilities maintenance mechanic, California State University, Dominguez Hills (staff representative)
  • Sedrick Spencer, vice president of government relations, Paramount and alumnus, California State University, San Bernardino (alumni representative)
  • Hon. Gaddi H. Vasquez, retired U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations and member, CSU Foundation Board of Governors (community representative)
  • William Watkins, vice president for student affairs and dean of students, California State University, Northridge (campus vice president/dean representative)
  • Richard Yao, president, California State University Channel Islands (campus president representative)
  • Lynnette Zelezny, president, California State University, Bakersfield (campus president representative)

The Implementation Committee for the Selection of the Chancellor will host hybrid open forums at three locations across California – one each in the south, central and north – in early February 2023 at the following locations:


South

February 7, 2023, 12:00 – 2:00 p.m.
CSU Chancellor's Office; Dumke Auditorium

Click here to register to provide comments virtually during the Chancellor's Office forum


Central

February 8, 2023, 12:00 – 2:00 p.m.
California State University, Bakersfield; Doré Theatre

Click here to register to provide comments virtually during the CSUB forum


North

February 9, 2023, 12:00 – 2:00 p.m.
San Francisco State University, McKenna Theatre (Creative Arts Building)

Click here to register to provide comments virtually during the SFSU forum


Each forum will provide an opportunity for members of the CSU community to participate in person or virtually to share their thoughts about the qualities and experiences needed by the next chancellor. All open forums will also be livestreamed.

Please note that members of the CSU community are welcome to attend any of the forums and provide in-person comment to the committees. Those who wish to provide comments virtually must register in advance at the links above.  Each link is unique to the specific forum.  Registration is not needed to attend in person or to observe virtually.


Please visit the Chancellor Search website for additional information.



About the California State University

The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, nearly 460,000 students, and 56,000 faculty and staff. Nearly 40 percent of the CSU's undergraduate students transfer from California Community Colleges. The CSU was created in 1960 with a mission of providing high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 132,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Dumke Auditorium with the copy "News Update" across it.
CSU Chancellor Search: Committee Members and Schedule of Open Forums Announced
CSU-Statement-on-Governors-January-2023-24-Budget-Proposal.aspx
  
1/17/2023 5:06 PMRuble, Alisia1/10/20231/10/2023 9:35 AM“The California State University is grateful that, in his 2023-24 January budget proposal, Governor Newsom indicated that he plans to fully fund the second year of the multi-year compact with the CSU."BudgetPress Release

The following statem​​​​ent can be attributed to CSU Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester:

“The California State University (CSU) is grateful that, in his 2023-24 January budget proposal, Governor Newsom indicated that he plans to fully fund the second year of the multi-year compact with the CSU. This will result in an increase of $227.3 million in ongoing funding in support of many of the university's key priorities. This proposal, despite uncertainty surrounding the state's economic circumstances, reinforces the administration's commitment to the CSU, it's belief in our mission and appreciation of our successes in transforming the lives of Californians."​


​On January 10, 2023, Governor Newsom proposed a 2023-24 budget that would allocate $227.3 million in recurring funding for the CSU, a 5 percent general fund increase or 2.85 percent overall increase to the university's operating budget.​



About the California State University

The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, nearly 460,000 students, and 56,000 faculty and staff. Nearly 40 percent of the CSU's undergraduate students transfer from California Community Colleges. The CSU was created in 1960 with a mission of providing high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 132,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.​

California's Capitol Building
CSU Statement on Governor’s January 2023-24 Budget Proposal
Cal-Maritime-Selects-First-Female-TSGB-Captain.aspx
  
1/9/2023 8:38 AMRuble, Alisia1/9/20231/9/2023 9:00 AMSamar Bannister returns to the CSU to serve as the Academy’s first female captain.AlumniStory

Having spent her childhood in the tiny, land-locked town of Lake City, Colorado, Samar Bannister was swept away by the sights and sounds she experienced when she first arrived at Cal Maritime in the 90s to pursue her dream of working in the deep-sea maritime industry.

Though the university only enrolled around 700 students at the time, it was a world away from her previous life where she attended elementary school with roughly four classmates and was bussed 55 miles to the next town to attend junior high and high school.  

“When I stepped onto campus the first time, the fog was rolling in—you could hear the signals from nearby ships—and the energy from the students was intoxicating," she recalls. “My time at the Academy truly was a dream, and it opened my​ eyes to the possibility of what was out there."

Bannister's four years at Cal Maritime were exciting ones. She says the formative education she received allowed the ​dreams of a small-town girl to become a reality. In addition to the academic experience, she took advantage of leadershipA young woman wearing a cadet uniform ​Captain Samar Bannister during her time as a student at Cal Maritime. opportunities that prepared her for the unique career of being a merchant mariner.

The proud alumna is thrilled to return to her alma mater to become the first female captain at Cal Maritime. As captain,​ she commands the Training Ship Golden Bear (TSGB), a working classroom that provides two months of at-sea training every summer for first- and third-year students and serves as a laboratory for new marine technology.

“When a friend told me of the opportunity, it was as if my compass swung true," Bannister says. “One of the greatest benefits is being part of the CSU, a huge network of people who love education and are focused on where we're going next."

As captain of the TSGB, Bannister will ensure the ship is up to industry standards and foster a safe and enjoyable environment for cadets while preparing them for careers in the maritime industry. This includes intellectual learning, training in applied technology, leadership development and exposure to different cultures.

“I work hard, treat everyone with respect and do the best that I can, so I hope I can be a role model for anyone who is striving to go to the next level," Bannister says.

Sailing into Foreign Territory

As a child, Bannister never felt she was treated differently by her parents because she was a girl. “I come from a family who did not discriminate against or favor either sex—you could either do the job or not," she says. “They taught me that everyone has their own strengths and weaknesses."

This mindset prepared her for her future work in the male-dominated maritime industry. “I was very aware that I was entering an environment and industry that was male-dominated, and I wanted to prove to everyone that I was a valuable member of the team," Bannister says. 

After graduating from Cal Maritime's Marine Transportation (MT) program in 2000, Bannister began her career conducting survey operations on a fleet of Small Waterplane Area Twin Hull (SWATH) research vessels and, soon after, moved up to a larger fleet of vessels, the Watson Class LMSR RO-RO's.

Bannister ​spent 14 years sailing the deep sea with Maersk Line, Limited, and Ocean Ships Inc., which provide transportation solutions in support of the military. In these roles, she worked in direct support of Operation Iraqi Freedom.

She also served in senior positions for Joint Logistics Over-the-Shore (JLOTS), acted as Commanding Officer of the USNS Soderman, a logistics naval vessel that supplies ships across the world with military equipment, and recently taught at the Training Resources Maritime Institute. She is a master mariner who holds an unlimited master's license, the highest grade of seafarer qualification.

“I am beyond appreciative of these experiences and proud to have been a captain of an efficient and safe crew who happily returned trip after trip," she says.

But her greatest accomplishment has been becoming a mother, Bannister says. She moved shoreside in 2014 to start a family with her husband Jack and embraced the roles of wife and mother. While her family is supportive of her decision to return to the maritime industry, the opportunity meant relocating them to Vallejo, California.

“I know my daughter Madeline is proud of me, but in her seven-year-old mind she's more concerned with how much I'll be away," Bannister says. “I hope in due course she will come to see the value of my hard work and perseverance."


Established in 1929, California State University Maritime Academy is the only degree-granting maritime academy on the West Coast. Located in Vallejo, California, the campus serves nearly 1,000 students and offers undergraduate degrees preparing students for careers in engineering, transportation, international relations, business, and global logistics. The new oceanography degree program launched in the fall of 2020. Cal Maritime also offers a master's degree in Transportation and Engineering Management, as well as a number of extended learning programs and courses.

A woman wearing a captains uniform
Buoyed by Education, Alumna Makes Herstory at Cal Maritime
CSU-Trustees-Finalize-Search-Process-for-Next-Chancellor.aspx
  
1/23/2023 12:06 PMSua, Ricky1/5/20231/5/2023 4:25 PMThe CSU Board of Trustees has launched the search for the next chancellor and has finalized a comprehensive and inclusive process that will guide the national search to identify and appoint the next leader of the 23-university system.ChancellorPress Release

The California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees has launched the search for the next chancellor and has finalized a comprehensive and inclusive process that will guide the national search to identify and appoint the next leader of the 23-university system.

“This process honors our principles of transparency and inclusivity, and demonstrates a commitment to collaboration by seeking the broadest possible engagement across CSU constituencies and stakeholder groups as we determine the desired characteristics of our next chancellor," said Wenda Fong, chair of the CSU Board of Trustees. “Our goal is to create the largest and most diverse pool of highly skilled and talented individuals, and to identify the single individual best suited to lead the most significant university system in the nation at this very important time for the CSU."

The process will include the appointment of two committees that will work collaboratively throughout the search.

An Implementation Committee is appointed by the chair of the board and will be comprised of eight members including the chair, vice chair, three trustees, the outgoing interim chancellor and one representative each from the California State Student Association (CSSA) and the Academic Senate of the CSU (ASCSU). This committee will work to identify the desired characteristics of a successful candidate and is responsible for conducting the final evaluation of all prospective candidates.

An Assessment Committee will work in parallel with the Implementation Committee and will be comprised of 12 members from a broad group of stakeholders: four trustees including the faculty trustee and a student trustee, one student representative from CSSA, one faculty representative from the ASCSU, one represented staff member, one vice president or academic dean from a CSU campus, two campus presidents, one CSU alum and one community member. This committee is responsible for conducting the initial review and comprehensive assessment of all prospective candidates and making recommendations to the Implementation Committee.

The full board of trustees will conduct interviews with finalists and appoint the next chancellor.

A dedicated chancellor search webpage with detailed information including the full rosters for both committees and a schedule of open forums that will take place in early February across the state will be shared in the near future.



About the California State University

The California State University is the largest system of four-year higher education in the country, with 23 campuses, nearly 460,000 students, and 56,000 faculty and staff. Nearly 40 percent of the CSU's undergraduate students transfer from California Community Colleges. The CSU was created in 1960 with a mission of providing high-quality, affordable education to meet the ever-changing needs of California. With its commitment to quality, opportunity and student success, the CSU is renowned for superb teaching, innovative research and for producing job-ready graduates. Each year, the CSU awards more than 132,000 degrees. One in every 20 Americans holding a college degree is a graduate of the CSU and our alumni are 4 million strong. Connect with and learn more about the CSU in the CSU NewsCenter.

Trustees assembled at the Office of the Chancellor during a Board of Trustees meeting
CSU Trustees Finalize Search Process for Next Chancellor
The-CSU-Celebrates-the-Life-of-Molly-Corbett-Broad.aspx
  
1/5/2023 1:41 PMThropay, Janessa1/5/20231/5/2023 1:40 PMThe California State University celebrates the life of Molly Corbett Broad, who passed away on January 2, 2023, at the age of 81.LeadershipStory

The California State University celebrates the life of Molly Corbett Broad, who passed away on January 2, 2023, at the age of 81. She was one of America's most skilled and influential higher-education leaders, as well as a trailblazer, having served as the first woman to lead the University of North Carolina system and the first woman to be appointed president of the American Council on Education since the organization's founding in 1918. She served as the CSU's senior vice chancellor for Administration and Finance from 1992-93, and as executive vice chancellor and chief operating officer from 1993-97.

“Molly Corbett Broad was a bold, principled and visionary leader whose impact on higher education cannot be overstated and who was an inspiration to many," said CSU Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester. “The innovations and best practices developed under Molly's leadership helped establish the CSU's solid operational foundation that supports a thriving learning and discovery experience for our students. Her impact at the CSU helped transform the lives of generations of Californians, and continues to this day."

Molly Corbett Broad smiling
The CSU Celebrates the Life of Molly Corbett Broad
Another-Year-in-the-Books.aspx
  
1/9/2023 12:46 PMThropay, Janessa12/12/202212/12/2022 4:05 PMAs the year closes, we look back at the work accomplished these past 12 months while preparing for what lies ahead.Story

Another Year in the Books

Nearly two years following the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, 2022 promised better days as the CSU was able to gradually welcome students back to campus and relaunch the many programs and services that create a well-rounded college experience. The year brought its share of ups and downs, but the CSU continued making its students the top priority, caring for their educational needs and well-being. As the year closes, we look back at the work accomplished these past 12 months while preparing for what lies ahead.

Students performing nursing training.
 

JANUARY

A Strong Start: The CSU kicked off the new year by enhancing the educational opportunities available to its students. First, the ADN-to-BSN program, a pathway designed to shorten transfer students' time to earning a Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree, was expanded to eight more campuses after a successful pilot at Cal States Fullerton and San Bernardino beginning in 2019. In addition, 16 campuses became #CaliforniansforAll College Corps partners, offering students who volunteer for public service hours an option to earn $10,000 for their work. Several students reflected on their time serving this year.

Three graduates in regalia.
 

FEBRUARY

Power of a Degree: In February, the CSU participated in the 17th annual Super Sunday event, partnering with more than 100 predominantly African American churches to advance access, opportunity and success for African American students.

We also dove into 10 benefits of earning a college degree. Besides gaining knowledge and real-world experience, being exposed to a diverse student population and making lifelong friends and mentors, doing so offers a whole host of additional perks from earning more money to living longer.

Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester
 

MARCH

Change in the Air: Following the resignation of Dr. Joseph I. Castro, the Board of Trustees appointed Jolene Koester, Ph.D., California State University, Northridge president emerita, interim chancellor of the CSU. She assumed leadership on May 1. That month, the board also voted to approve the removal of the SAT and ACT standardized tests from undergraduate admissions processes. The university is currently developing admissions criteria to replace the tests.

Monica Say on CPP campus.
 

APRIL

Action for Equity: In an effort to eliminate graduation rate equity gaps that affect underrepresented students, the CSU announced five new priorities for Graduation Initiative 2025. We launched a five-part series looking at each of those priorities, beginning with reenrollment efforts.

In June 2020, the CSU Council of Chiefs of Police pledged to implement recommendations from President Obama's Task Force on 21st Century Policing that were created in response to a public outcry for police reform and accountability across the U.S​. We checked in with University Police Departments on how they're implementing strategies to create a more inclusive and welcoming environment for students, faculty, staff and visitors.

Student using a microscope.
 

MAY

Great Minds of the Future: Each spring, student researchers from across the CSU present their work at the annual CSU Student Research Competition. We spoke with a few of this year's first-place winners.

Wherever students are learning today, the CSU is making strides to meet them where they are. Our “The Future is Flexible" piece explained how faculty and staff are learning new ways to embed equitable learning practices into their teaching and course design to address students' diverse learning needs.

Student turning her tassel during commencement.
 

JUNE

Turn Your Tassels, Class of 2022!: After two years of navigating campus life amidst a global pandemic, the 2022 graduating classes of all 23 CSU campuses were able to toss their caps at traditional commencement ceremonies surrounded by family and friends.

Also in June, the CSU convened its inaugural biennial Juneteenth Symposium to celebrate African American history and achievement and promote and sustain the anti-racism work underway across the university.

Student working with young children.
 

JULY

An Open Road to Education: With the approval of the state budget, seven CSU campuses received funding through the state's K-16 Education Collaboratives Grant Program to eliminate equity gaps in higher education and workforce participation.

Student with camera.
 

AUGUST

Photo of the Year: As the summer came to a close, we took a look back at meaningful moments from the 2021-22 academic year. Photographers from each of our 23 campuses shared their favorite shot from the school year—excluding commencement—and why it captures the CSU spirit. Meet the top three winning photographers.

We also explored CSU Summer Bridge, a transitional summer program that helps first-year students from historically underserved backgrounds realize their potential.

Student's mortarboard at commencement.
 

SEPTEMBER

Lifting Up California Communities: In celebration of National Hispanic Heritage Month, some of the CSU's Latinx university leaders reflected on their journey and inspiration.

September also marks the start of a new school year. As students returned to school, they saw a few changes on their respective CSU campuses. And, for the first time since 2019, the university's 23 Trustees' Scholars were honored in-person at the CSU Office of the Chancellor for their talent, diligence and zeal.

Student working at computer.
 

OCTOBER

Preparing the Next Cyber Defenders: October is designated as Cybersecurity Awareness Month to increase the public's understanding of cyber threats and the urgent need for talent in the vast field of cybersecurity. As a national leader in cybersecurity education, the CSU is helping close this workforce ga​p by accelerating its graduates into a broad range of cyber careers.

Veteran bearing the U.S. flag.
 

NOVEMBER

Servicemembers to Students: To commemorate Veterans Day, we asked student veterans about how their military service has shaped them and how their university helps them achieve greatness.

Food, fiber and fuel make up the trifecta of agriculture. But rising threats are upending the security of those agricultural products across the world. Four CSU campuses​​ received funding to enhance their agriculture programs, prepare the next generation of experts and secure the industry's future success.

Two students working at a whiteboard.
 

DECEMBER

HSI Grants for Statewide Impact: The Global HSI Equity Innovation Hub at CSUN awarded its first grants​ supporting CSU efforts to inspire the next generation of creators and innovators to pursue high-demand careers in STEM and the creative a​nd tech industries.

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As the year closes, we anticipate what's to come in the next 365 days. For now, the CSU wishes everyone happy holidays and happy new year!​


Another Year in the Books
Chancellor-Emeritus-White-Award-Kerr-2022.aspx
  
12/12/2022 1:52 PMRuble, Alisia12/9/202212/9/2022 11:30 AMUC Berkeley Academic Senate honors former CSU chancellor for his contributions to the advancement of higher education. LeadershipStory

​CSU Chancellor Emeritus Timothy P. White was recently named a recipient of the 2022 Clark Kerr Award.

Awarded by the UC Berkeley Division of the Academic Senate, the Clark Kerr Award recognizes those who have made extraordinary and distinguished contributions to the advancement of higher education. One of two awardees, White was named along with San Diego Community College District Chancellor Emerita Constance M. Carroll 

Chancellor Emeritus White is honored for his distinguished service for both the CSU and UC systems, along with other public universities. As stated in UC Berkeley's award announcement, White's educational and academic career path exemplifies the brilliance of Clark Kerr's vision when creating the California Master Plan for Higher Education.

Born in Argentina, White immigrated to California as a child, and was the first in his family to pursue higher education. He attended Diablo Valley College, earned a bachelor's from Fresno State and master's from Cal State East Bay. He earned his Ph.D. in exercise physiology from Berkeley, and then served as a professor and chair of the Department of Human Biodynamics there, before moving to the University of Michigan as a professor and chair of the Department of Movement Science. 

As an academic leader, White served as dean, provost, and executive vice president at Oregon State University from 1996 to 2004, and from 2004 to 2008 he was president of the University of Idaho. As Chancellor of UC Riverside from 2008 to 2012, White led enrollment growth and strategic planning, securing gifts and financing for a new School of Medicine. From 2012 to 2020 he served as CSU chancellor, overseeing 23 campuses, with an enrollment of almost half a million students at the time of his retirement. One of White's lasting accomplishments was launching the Graduation Initiative 2025 effort to increase graduation rates for undergraduates and close the equity gap between underserved students and their peers. During White's tenure, enrollment, graduation rates, state investment and donor support reached all-time highs.

“I am humbled and deeply honored to receive this award, and this recognition would not have come about without the hard work of the leadership, faculty, staff and students of the California State University during my tenure," said White.

UC Berkeley's Academic Senate created the Clark Kerr Award in 1968 as a tribute to the leadership and legacy of UC President Emeritus Kerr. Past recipients have come from inside and outside the Berkeley community, including former California Governor and Supreme Court Chief Justice Earl Warren, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute immediate past president and noted physicist Shirley Ann Jackson, and Columbia University President Lee Bollinger.

 

Learn more about Berkeley's Clark Kerr Award and Chancellor Emeritus White's legacy at the CSU.

CSU Chancellor Emeritus White engaging with students at Cal State Dominguez Hills
CSU Chancellor Emeritus Timothy P. White Receives 2022 Clark Kerr Award
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CSU-Continues-to-Provide-the-Most-Affordable-Higher-Education-in-the-Nation.aspx
  
1/25/20231/25/2023 3:40 PMWith the country’s lowest tuition and fees, CSU institutions provide a proven path toward upward mobility.With the country’s lowest tuition and fees, CSU institutions provide a proven path toward upward mobility.
Student shakes hands with faculty member at graduation
CSU Continues to Provide the Most Affordable Higher Education in the NationAffordabilityPress Release
wang-family-excellence-awards-2023.aspx
  
1/24/20231/24/2023 1:00 PMWang Family Excellence Awards honor exceptional contributions in teaching, scholarship and service to CSU students.Wang Family Excellence Awards honor exceptional contributions in teaching, scholarship and service to CSU students.
headshots of five people winning an award
CSU Faculty and Staff Honored for Dedication to Student SuccessFacultyPress Release
Statement-on-Pending-Retirement-of-Cal-State-Fullerton-President-Virjee.aspx
  
1/23/20231/23/2023 7:40 AMWhile president of California State University, Fullerton and throughout his service as general counsel for the CSU, Fram Virjee has been the epitome of a servant leader, displaying an infectious passion to improve opportunities for students.​​​
Cal State Fullerton President Virjee speaking at graduation ceremony
Statement on Pending Retirement of California State University, Fullerton President Framroze VirjeeLeadershipPress Release
Chico-State-Presidential-Search-Committee-to-Hold-Open-Forum.aspx
  
1/20/20231/20/2023 9:20 AMThe California State University Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of California State University, Chico to succeed Gayle E.  Hutchinson, Ph.D., who will retire as campus president at the end of the 2022-23 academic year.
California State University, Chico campus building
California State University, Chico Presidential Search Committee to Hold Open ForumLeadershipPress Release
Sacramento-State-Presidential-Search-Committee-to-Hold-Open-Forum.aspx
  
1/19/20231/19/2023 10:25 AM​The California State University Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of California State University, Sacramento to succeed Robert S.  Nelsen, Ph.D., who will retire as campus president at the end of the 2022-23 academic year.
Sacramento State University Sign on Campus
California State University, Sacramento Presidential Search Committee to Hold Open ForumLeadershipPress Release
Statement-on-Pending-Retirement-of-Stanislaus-State-President-Junn.aspx
  
1/18/20231/18/2023 10:45 AM"Many thousands of students have benefitted from Dr. Junn’s wise leadership, and I thank her for her numerous and extraordinary contributions over the course of her nearly four-decade career with the California State University."
Stanislaus State President Ellen Junn speaking at graduation ceremony
Statement on Pending Retirement of California State University, Stanislaus President Ellen JunnLeadershipPress Release
CSU-Chancellor-Search-Committee-Members-and-Schedule-of-Open-Forums-Announced.aspx
  
1/11/20231/11/2023 11:20 AMAs part of the comprehensive and inclusive process of selecting the next Chancellor, the CSU has finalized the members of the Implementation and Assessment Committees and the schedule for the open forums.
Dumke Auditorium with the copy "News Update" across it.
CSU Chancellor Search: Committee Members and Schedule of Open Forums AnnouncedChancellorPress Release
CSU-Statement-on-Governors-January-2023-24-Budget-Proposal.aspx
  
1/10/20231/10/2023 9:35 AM“The California State University is grateful that, in his 2023-24 January budget proposal, Governor Newsom indicated that he plans to fully fund the second year of the multi-year compact with the CSU."
California's Capitol Building
CSU Statement on Governor’s January 2023-24 Budget ProposalBudgetPress Release
CSU-Trustees-Finalize-Search-Process-for-Next-Chancellor.aspx
  
1/5/20231/5/2023 4:25 PMThe CSU Board of Trustees has launched the search for the next chancellor and has finalized a comprehensive and inclusive process that will guide the national search to identify and appoint the next leader of the 23-university system.
Trustees assembled at the Office of the Chancellor during a Board of Trustees meeting
CSU Trustees Finalize Search Process for Next ChancellorChancellorPress Release
Statement-on-Pending-Retirement-of-Cal-Maritime-President-Cropper.aspx
  
11/28/202211/28/2022 2:20 PM“Throughout his tenure leading the California State University Maritime Academy, President Thomas A. Cropper has done exceptional work to integrate our most unique institution into the California State University system."
Cal Maritime President Cropper at podium during graduation ceremony
CSU Statement on Pending Retirement of Cal Maritime President Thomas A. CropperLeadershipPress Release
CSU-Trustees-Strengthen-Policy-with-Approval-of-New-Executive-Consulting-Assignment-Program.aspx
  
11/16/202211/16/2022 11:00 AM​​​​​The California State University Board of Trustees today approved a new Executive Consulting Assignment program for eligible executives.
CSU Interim Chancellor Jolene Koester and accompanying board members at September board meeting
CSU Trustees Strengthen Policy with Approval of New Executive Consulting Assignment ProgramPolicyPress Release
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11/16/202211/16/2022 9:05 AMThe California State University Board of Trustees has appointed Cynthia Teniente-Matson, Ed.D., to serve as president of San José State University.
Cynthia Teniente-Matson smiling with hands crossed over each other
Cynthia Teniente-Matson Appointed President of San José State UniversityLeadershipPress Release
Statement-on-Pending-Retirement-of-California-State-University-Sacramento-President-Robert-Nelsen.aspx
  
11/2/202211/2/2022 8:55 AM"President Robert Nelsen is a brilliant, compassionate and student-focused leader who has successfully guided Sacramento State through a period of remarkable growth and transformation."
Sacramento State University President Nelson smiling and talking with students
Statement on Pending Retirement of California State University, Sacramento President Robert S. NelsenLeadershipPress Release
Four-Year-Graduation-Rate-for-First-Time-Students-Hits-Historic-High.aspx
  
10/28/202210/28/2022 11:10 AMIntentional focus across all 23 California State University (CSU) campuses continues to result in increased student achievement.
California State University student on the shoulders of another student during commencement ceremony
Four-Year Graduation Rate for First-Time Students Hits Historic High with CSU Graduation Initiative 2025Student SuccessPress Release
California-State-University-Los-Angeles-Presidential-Search-Committee-to-Hold-Open-Forum.aspx
  
10/21/202210/21/2022 10:50 AMThe California State University (CSU) Board of Trustees is beginning the search for a new president of California State University, Los Angeles.
California State University, Los Angeles campus
California State University, Los Angeles Presidential Search Committee to Hold Open ForumLeadershipPress Release
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1/30/20231/30/2023 10:00 AMHow the CSU is implementing equitable learning practices to help students overcome academic challenges on the road to graduation.Graduation InitiativeStory
Action for Equity: Equitable Learning Practices
CSU-Workforce-Partnerships.aspx
  
1/23/20231/23/2023 9:00 AMCompanies like Amazon, Disney and Stater Bros. partner with the CSU to upskill employees and provide an affordable pathway to earning a bachelor's degree.AccessStory
college students and mickey mouse wearing a graduation gown at disneyland
Educating California's Workforce
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1/9/20231/9/2023 9:00 AMSamar Bannister returns to the CSU to serve as the Academy’s first female captain.AlumniStory
A woman wearing a captains uniform
Buoyed by Education, Alumna Makes Herstory at Cal Maritime
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1/5/20231/5/2023 1:40 PMThe California State University celebrates the life of Molly Corbett Broad, who passed away on January 2, 2023, at the age of 81.LeadershipStory
Molly Corbett Broad smiling
The CSU Celebrates the Life of Molly Corbett Broad
Another-Year-in-the-Books.aspx
  
12/12/202212/12/2022 4:05 PMAs the year closes, we look back at the work accomplished these past 12 months while preparing for what lies ahead.Story
Another Year in the Books
Chancellor-Emeritus-White-Award-Kerr-2022.aspx
  
12/9/202212/9/2022 11:30 AMUC Berkeley Academic Senate honors former CSU chancellor for his contributions to the advancement of higher education. LeadershipStory
CSU Chancellor Emeritus White engaging with students at Cal State Dominguez Hills
CSU Chancellor Emeritus Timothy P. White Receives 2022 Clark Kerr Award
How-the-CSU-is-Prioritizing-Students-Needs.aspx
  
12/8/202212/8/2022 4:20 PMAs a national leader in studying the prevalence of food and housing insecurity for college students, the California State University understands the significant role basic needs play in student success. Basic Needs InitiativeStory
CSU students volunteering at campus food pantry
How the CSU is Prioritizing Students’ Needs
CSU-HSI-Community-Grants.aspx
  
12/5/202212/5/2022 9:00 AMNearly $2 million awarded to 17 finalists as part of the hub's CSU HSI Community Grants.STEMStory
two students studying in a classroom
CSUN’s Global HSI Equity Innovation Hub Awards Grants for Statewide Impact
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11/28/202211/28/2022 11:05 AMTake a look at stories from the CSU you may have missed this year.Student SuccessStory
6 Stories You May Have Missed
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11/15/202211/15/2022 11:50 AMPerez is working collectively with campuses to provide financial support to students for housing, reduce homelessness among the CSU community and address the immediate basic needs crises.Basic Needs InitiativeStory
Students moving their belongings into their student housing.
CSU’s Dilcie Perez Tapped for Statewide Task Force to Advance Housing Security
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11/14/202211/14/2022 2:15 PMA state investment in CSU agricultural programs will ensure graduates lead the industry to a more sustainable, resilient future.AgricultureStory
The Changing Face of Agriculture
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11/8/202211/8/2022 12:50 PMCalifornia State University San Marcos earns top honors for graduating more economically disadvantaged students at lower tuition into good paying jobs. Social MobilityStory
CSU Among the Top in Social Mobility Across the Nation
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11/7/202211/7/2022 10:40 AMIn their own words, student veterans reflect on their time in the armed forces and the community they found at the CSU.VeteransStory
two military cadets perform a flag raising ceremony
Servicemembers to Students
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10/31/202210/31/2022 2:50 PMThe CSU provides a high-quality education at an unparalleled value, making a four-year degree within reach to more students.ApplyStory
man with grad cap and sunglasses
3 Ways the CSU Makes College More Accessible
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10/31/202210/31/2022 8:00 AMStudents serve California and gain relevant experience for future careers through the #CaliforniansForAll College Corps program.Service LearningStory
college students taking an oath
CSU Partners with California Volunteers to Benefit Students and Communities
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