Appendix 1. Partnership Access Indicators | Accountability | Access to Excellence | CSU
 
Access To Excellence2008 Accountability Plan

Appendix 1
Partnership Access Indicators

Increasing the numbers of first-time freshmen and undergraduate transfers to meet the State’s need for Californians with baccalaureates and reducing the access gaps for underrepresented and low-income students cannot be accomplished without partnerships among CSU system and institutions, school and community college communities, business and industry, and government. Federal, state, and institutional financial aid, and especially extra-governmental financial aid that serve students who are otherwise ineligible for grants like Pells, CalGrants, and State University Grants are essential for students in need. All students deserve rigorous academic preparation in K-12 and community colleges. In addition, Super Saturday and Super Sunday targeted outreach via faith congregations showcase the roles that churches and community organizations can play in spreading the word that college is affordable, college is worth the investment, and college is for every young person who is willing to study and learn in ways that complement the outreach of CSU, California Community Colleges, and high school college counselors, advisers, and staff. Extraordinary partnerships are essential for the educational pipeline to flow as it should.

As such, CSU Accountability Indicators under Access to Excellence are prefaced with California Partnership Access Indicators to highlight the educational pipeline between high school and postsecondary education in California. All of the proposed indicators already are produced by the California Department of Education, the California Postsecondary Education Commission, and the California State University.

Increase in the Numbers of New Undergraduate Students to the CSU
  • # of California public high graduates (spring 2009, state and regions)
  • # and % of California public high school (PHS) graduates who completed a-g (spring 2009, state and regions)
  • # of California Community College first-time freshmen (fall 2009) and % of California PHS graduates (state and regions)
  • # of California State University first-time freshmen (fall 2009) and % of California PHS graduates (state and regions)
  • # of University of California first-time freshmen (fall 2009) and % of California PHS graduates (state and regions)
  • # of California public postsecondary first-time freshmen (fall 2009) and cumulative % of California PHS graduates (state and regions)

There are many federal and state accountability indicators on access and diversity that provide comparability for the CSU system and its individual universities, but none quite captures the full extent of new undergraduates that the CSU admits and enrolls. As such, it frequently is missed, ignored, or forgotten that the majority of CSU baccalaureate degree recipients are awarded to undergraduate transfers, not to native students (those who started as CSU first-time freshmen). The approach taken with the indicator coins a simple way to highlight the extent to which the CSU actually enrolls new undergraduates during the year. This parsimonious approach uses National Association of System Heads (NASH)/Education Trust definitions for underrepresented (URM) students and low income students1 and African American/ Black, Hispanic/ Latino(a), and American Indian/ Alaskan Natives.

Reduction of the Gap in Access to the CSU for Underrepresented, Low-Income, and Male/Female New Undergraduates

System Partnership Indicators

  • # CSU new undergraduates (2009-10)

Underrepresented

  • # and % of underrepresented California PHS graduates (spring 2009)
  • # and % of underrepresented CSU new undergraduates (2009-10)
  • % of underrepresented CSU new undergraduates/ % of URM California PHS graduates — parity equals 1, 1.0 minus the indicator is the access gap

Low-Income

  • # and % of estimate low-income California PHS graduates (spring 2009)
  • # and % of Pell CSU new undergraduates (2009-10)
  • % of Pell CSU new undergraduates/ % of estimated low-income California PHS graduates — parity equals 1, 1.0 minus the indicator is the access gap

Gender

  • # and % of male/female CSU new undergraduates (2009-10)

Individual University Partnership Indicators
  • # of underrepresented CSU new undergraduates (2009-10, individual universities) and % of system underrepresented new undergraduates
  • # of Pell grant-recipient CSU new undergraduates (2009-10, individual universities) and % of system Pell new undergraduates
  • # and % of female CSU new undergraduates (2009-10)
Improvement in College Readiness of CSU First-Time Freshmen
  • # of California public high school juniors (spring 2008, state and regions)
  • # and % of California public high school juniors who took the EAP (spring 2008, state and regions)
  • # and % of high school juniors not demonstrating proficiency on the EAP who took opportunities to achieve proficiency in senior year (including targeted 12th-grade courses, online self-instructional programs, etc.)
  • # and percentage of CSU first-time freshmen college ready in English and in mathematics (fall 2008, state and regions)

1 URM are African Americans/ Blacks, Latino(a)s, and American Indians/ Native Americans; Education Trust provides the estimate on percentage of state high school graduates who are low-income.