2012-13 Philanthropic Annual Report

Chart Details

Benchmarking Performance

The factors for determining peer groups include the number of full time professional fundraisers, the number of individual donors, and the endowment market value. These factors have been determined as the leading indicators for fundraising success.

Three-Year History of Gift Commitments by Peer Group*

Three-Year History of Gift Commitments by Peer Group

*Does not include the Chancellor's Office

Three-Year History of Gift Commitments by Peer Group
Peer Group 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13
Group I $46,896,354 $45,465,873 $47,471,488
Group II $152,588,829 $102,440,896 $73,534,486
Group III $143,327,890 $146,634,211 $214,298,938
Grand Total $342,813,073 $294,540,980 $335,304,912

Note 1: In 2012-13, San José moved from Group 2 to peer Group 3.

Charitable Gift Commitments as a Percentage of the State General Fund Allocation
  2010/11 2011/12 2012/13
Gift Commitments* $339,167,504 $297,010,687 $338,328,036
State General Fund $2,433,901,014 $1,936,822,538 $1,825,646,737
Total Gift Commitments as a %
of State General Fund Allocation
14% 15% 19%
Group I Average 7% 7% 8%
Group II Average 14% 11% 11%
Group III Average 22% 31% 41%

*Includes gift commitments to Chancellor's Office.
Note 1: In 2012-13, San José moved from Group 2 to peer Group 3.


Endowment

Through donor generosity and wise investment, the CSU is building a lasting base of support to sustain the university’s foundational principles of access, affordability, quality and completion.

As an example, CSU Trustee Emeritus Kenneth Fong endowed a scholarship to recognize a recipient of the CSU Trustees’ Award for Outstanding Achievement whose focus is in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. This exceptional student is named the Trustee Emeritus Kenneth Fong Scholar and receives a scholarship of $6,000.

For the third consecutive year, the total market value for CSU endowments exceeded $1 billion, totaling almost $1.2 billion this year. This peak market value represents an historic high for the CSU system and campuses.

In 2012-2013, donors contributed $62.1 million in new gifts toward endowments. Over a three-year period, $162 million in new endowment gifts has been added to endowments throughout the CSU. Collectively, CSU institutions distributed over $37 million from endowment in support of student scholarships, faculty research and academic programs.

Following a down year in the markets, endowment investments gained 10.99 percent on average in 2012-2013. This was a significant return and consistent with endowment performance at universities across the nation. Peer group and systemwide investment returns are presented as dollar-weighted averages.

Endowment Market Value

Endowment Market Value

Endowment Market Value
Endowment Breakdown 2010/11
Market Value
2011/12
Market Value
2012/13
Market Value
Corpus and Prior Years Investment Return
(Net Other Expenses)
$804,899,704 $1,034,776,453 $1,030,307,877
New Gifts to Endowment $54,524,828 $45,581,098 $62,145,960
Annual Investment Return $196,865,457 -$12,447,980 $126,433,927
Distribution -$31,897,203 -$41,692,216 -$37,179,363
Total Market Value $1,024,392,787 $1,026,217,355 $1,181,708,401
Endowment Investment Performance
Investment Pool
Asset Range
# CSU CSU Average
Investment Return
>$100 M to ≤$500 M 3 10.9%
>$50 M to ≤$100 M 4 11.3%
>$25 M to ≤$50 M 5 7.3%
≤$25 M 12 11.3%

2012/2013 CSU Median = 10.93%

2012/2013 Industry Benchmark: Russell 3000 65% and Barclay's Aggregate Bond Index 35% = 12.44%


Individuals

All giving is welcome, but individual donors share a connection to the CSU that adds unique meaning to their gifts. Gifts from individuals include giving from alumni, parents, faculty, staff, students and friends of the university.

As an example, alumna Anna W. Ngai came to California State University, Long Beach as an international student from Hong Kong and earned her bachelor’s degree in finance and business administration in 1974. Her lead gift of $3 million to the university’s new alumni center will help inspire, facilitate and sustain involvement with and support of the university.

In 2012-2013, gift receipts from individuals increased $28.6 million, or 27 percent, to $135.8 million. Sixteen gifts of more than $1 million amongst ten campuses (Fresno, Fullerton, Long Beach, Pomona, San Diego, San Francisco, San José, San Luis Obispo, San Marcos and Sonoma) accounted for 33 percent of all gifts from individuals.

The number of donors is a key indicator of success in attracting philanthropic support to the university. This year, the number of individuals giving to the CSU reached 221,394.

Alumni donors made up 40 percent of individual donors and contributed $56.5 million, or 42 percent of giving from individuals. Alumni additionally supported the university with $1.3 million in membership dues.

Individual Giving

Individual Giving

Gifts from individuals include giving from alumni, parents, faculty, staff, students and friends of the university. In 2011-2012, gift receipts from individuals increased $7.9 million, or 8 percent, to $107 million. Thirteen percent of all gifts from individuals was attributed to eight gifts of more than $1 million at four campuses (Fullerton, San Diego, San Francisco, and Sonoma).

The number of donors is a key indicator of success in attracting philanthropic support to the university. Continuing with a steady growth trend over recent years, the number of individuals giving to the CSU reached 224,194.

In 2011-2012, alumni donors made up 33 percent of individual donors and contributed $40 million, or 37 percent of giving from individuals. Alumni additionally supported the university with nearly $1.4 million in membership dues.

Individual Giving
2010/11
Individual Giving
2011/12
Individual Giving
2012/13
Individual Giving
Other Individuals Totals* $60,329,369 $67,002,874 $79,248,922
Alumni Totals $38,970,711 $40,186,263 $56,541,930
Individual Giving Grand Totals $99,300,080 $107,189,137 $135,790,852

*Includes gifts from parents, faculty, staff, students, and friends of the university.


Organizations

Organizations are often more capable than individuals of providing large gifts and partnering with the CSU to serve vital campus and community needs. Gifts from organizations include giving from corporations, foundations, and other organizations, such as the United Way.

As an example, Chevron Corporation made a $750,000 grant and pledged another $500,000 for fiscal year 2013-2014 to support the Mathematics Achievement Academies program. The funds will help build on California State University, East Bay’s commitment to improve education in science, technology, engineering and mathematics education through evidence-based teaching and learning practices that demonstrate measurable outcomes.

In 2012-2013, gift receipts from organizations increased $14 million, or 11 percent, to $147 million.

This year, donations from corporations held relatively steady at $51 million, which included $4.6 million in company products. Corporations also support educational priorities by matching contributions from their employees. The CSU received 3,531 matching gifts to enhance the value of individual contributions by over $1.3 million.

Foundation contributions increased 14 percent from prior year, rising to $79.7 million. The aggregate value of foundation gifts equaled 28 percent of all charitable gift receipts in 2012-2013. With 428 contributions, family foundations contributed $25 million. Fourteen gifts of $1 million or more were received by seven universities, including Fresno, Fullerton, Northridge, Pomona, San Diego, San José, and San Luis Obispo.

Organizations' Giving

Organizations' Giving

Organizations' Giving
2010/11
Organization Giving
2011/12
Organization Giving
2012/13
Organization Giving
Other Organizations' Totals* $12,200,062 $11,561,338 $16,133,305
Corporation Totals $52,992,403 $51,687,437 $51,313,933
Foundation Totals $76,022,095 $69,740,116 $79,694,411
Organization Giving Grand Totals $141,214,560 $132,988,891 $147,141,649

*Includes gifts from all organizations not defined as a Corporation or Foundation.


System Highlights

  • CSU students majoring in science, technology, engineering and math are getting a boost in their educational experiences by applying their knowledge and skills to real-world local challenges. With grants from Southern California Gas ($50,000), Edison International ($25,000) and the Corporation for National and Community Service ($500,000), CSU faculty created engaging service-learning courses that enable CSU students to not only master their academic content but also make a difference. California’s future scientists and engineers are already having an impact on the restoration of habitats for endangered species, energy conversation and efficiency, water quality, and the development of assistive technologies, to name a few areas. “The service-learning programs that are being developed will help our economy and improve energy efficiency now, and in the years to come,” said Gillian Wright, SoCalGas director of Customer Programs and Assistance.
  • The Give Students a Compass program infuses “high impact educational practices” into the state’s higher education curriculum, providing a more engaging and effective experience in the first two years – with the aim of reducing achievement gaps and improving retention and graduation rates. High impact educational practices have included internships, study abroad and service learning. For the third year in a row, the Walter S. Johnson Foundation has given at least $100,000 to support the program. The Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Foundation continued its ongoing support with an additional $100,000 donation. The Hewlett Foundation and the Irvine Foundation support the project as well. Over halfway through the three-year project, Give Students a Compass continues to draw much attention from educational audiences around the state and the nation.
  • Felicia Anderson felt it was more than just a coincidence when CSU, Long Beach Professor Anna Ortiz asked for education doctoral students interested in research at Millikan High School. “It was a calling,” said Anderson – a long-time Millikan GEAR UP program facilitator and proud mother of a Millikan graduate. The doctoral candidate made her case for a qualitative study of small learning communities and Linked Learning – receiving financial support through the generosity of the James Irvine Foundation. The Irvine Foundation has had a long history as a sponsor of education innovation. Recent support has included $600,000 in funding for the California State University’s preparation and assistance of new teachers, beginning with the Long Beach Unified School District partnership. The grant focuses on pioneering efforts to institute project-based learning that links classroom instruction to practical applications found in career settings. This is the very topic that Anderson wanted to explore. “It is about teachers going from good to great and beautiful works of student expression,” said Anderson. Her interviews with teachers, students, counselors and administrators teased out the essence of the program’s success – ownership. Both students and teachers owned the results of the projects and dug in deep to create something lasting. One social justice team even took on the creation and execution of a business plan to produce and sell products for natural disaster relief. Anderson is finalizing her dissertation based on her research. Her promotion to Assistant Principal at David Starr Jordan High School also ensures that what she learned at Millikan High School will spread to benefit more students.
Gift Commitments 2012/13
New Gifts $217,819,211
New Pledges $58,594,333
Testamentary Commitments $60,363,066
Native American and Local Government Contributions $1,551,426
Total $338,328,036
Charitable Gift Receipts
New Gifts $217,819,211
Pledge Payments $65,113,287
2012/13 Total $282,932,501
Charitable Gifts 3 Year History

Charitable Gifts 3 Yeay History

Three-Year History of Charitable Gift Commitments by Peer Group
2010/11
Total
Gift Receipts
2011/12
Total
Gift Receipts
2012/13
Total
Gift Receipts
$240,514,560 $240,178,028 $282,932,501
Charitable Gifts by Source of Gift
Charitable Gifts by Source of Gift
Alumni circle for pie chartAlumni 19.98%
Parents circle for pie chartParents 1.30%
Other Individuals circle for pie chartOther Individuals 26.71%
Foundations circle for pie chartFoundations 28.17%
Corporations circle for pie chartCorporations 18.14%
Other Organizations circle for pie chartOther Organizations
5.70%
Charitable Gifts by Source of
Gift Disbursement
Charitable Gifts by Gift Disbursement
Alumni circle for pie chartCurrent Programs 61.42%
Campus ImprovementsCampus Improvements 4.57%
Endowment circle for pie chartEndowment 21.96%
Unrestricted circle for pie chartUnrestricted 4.03%
Other circle for pie chartOther
8.01%