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Identifying Core Business School Competencies

Golnaz Sadri

Department of Management
California State University, Fullerton

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Abstract

The objective of the present study was to identify some core competencies of potential relevance to business school curricula. An examination of the literature, the AACSB guidelines, and the mission, goals, and curriculum of the California State University Fullerton business school identified seven core competencies of potential relevance to business schools: written communication, oral communication, computer skills, teamwork skills, cultural awareness, ethics, and functional-area competence. This study addressed three major research questions. First, are these competencies actually important to business students and to the employers of business students? Second, which specific tasks within each competency do business school graduates need to perform in the course of their daily professional lives? Third, is the CSU Fullerton business school effectively able to teach these competencies? The two samples involved in this study included a group of 500 business school alumni and 46 likely employers of business school students. Responses from these two groups showed some similarities and differences in the perceived importance of these seven competencies. Oral communication was perceived as most important by both the employers and the alumni but was found to be among the least effectively taught of the competencies. Implications of the present findings for curriculum reform are discussed.

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Posted December 5, 2002

All material appearing in this journal is subject to applicable copyright laws.
Publication in this journal in no way indicates the endorsement of the content by the California State University, the Institute for Teaching and Learning, or the Exchanges Editorial Board.
©2002 by Golnaz Sadri

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