Chancellor

The California State University Employee Update
Wednesday, March 14, 2012

Chancellor Receives Top Honor
Chancellor Charles B. Reed has won the 2012 TIAA-CREF Hesburgh Award for Leadership Excellence, one of the most prestigious honors in academic stewardship.

The TIAA-CREF Institute announced the award at the American Council on Education’s (ACE) annual meeting in Los Angeles Monday.

“Dr. Reed’s remarkable, collaborative leadership styles reinforce the need to build bridges both within an institution and throughout the surrounding community,” said Stephanie Bell-Rose, managing director and head of the TIAA-CREF Institute.

The award is named in honor of the Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C., president emeritus of the University of Notre Dame, nationally renowned educator and world humanitarian. The chancellor was one of two winners chosen by an independent panel of judges based on excellence in higher education leadership.

The award recognizes the chancellor’s commitment to serving students and successfully steering the university through state budget cuts while meeting the complex demands of increasing enrollment. It also acknowledges the chancellor’s efforts to build collaborative partnerships and award-winning outreach programs–particularly those dedicated to underrepresented students–as well as his support of multi-campus initiatives to improve research and instruction, and benefit local businesses and communities.

“This award is especially meaningful as it reflects the important role higher education plays in providing students with opportunities for a better life,” said Reed. “Father Hesburgh's ideals of the transforming power of education remain particularly relevant for students, and it is an extraordinary honor to be the recipient of an award in recognition of his vision.” More information.

Trustees to Grapple with Ongoing Budget Challenges
The CSU’s need to address a proposed additional $200 million cut to its budget will be discussed by the Board of Trustees at its meeting in Long Beach next week.

Rather than restoring funding to the CSU, Gov. Jerry Brown's proposed 2012-13 state budget calls for the same level of state support as this year, provided that voters pass a November tax initiative. If that measure fails, the CSU could face an additional $200 million cut which would drop the university’s level of state support to $1.8 billion--the lowest level since 1996-97--but the CSU is now serving 90,000 more students.

The CSU has an ongoing $510 million budget deficit, the result of state funding reductions combined with mandatory cost increases. Despite implementing comprehensive strategies to improve efficiencies and reduce costs throughout the enterprise, the additional $200 million cut will significantly impact the CSU's ability to serve students at current levels.

The trustees will also hear an overview of the CSU campuses' advancement goals for both gift commitments and investment in advancement programs; and receive updates on Cal State Online, the CSU's online learning initiative focused on increasing students' access to high-quality online education programs, and the CSU's Rent Digital program, which provides CSU students with more affordable course materials through rental of digital textbooks. More information.

CSU Advances Federal Priorities in Week of D.C. Meetings
Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta applauded the CSU’s efforts to provide educational opportunities and services for returning veterans in remarks to system leaders at the CSU's annual Hill Day in Washington, D.C., February 29. The CSU enrolls more than 11,500 student veterans, service members and their families, and maintains veteran programs at all campuses.

The CSU’s system and campus leaders and staff also met with members of the California Congressional delegation and Obama administration officials to advocate for the CSU's 2012 federal priorities, including student aid; improving college access and completion; preparing students for the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields; teacher preparation; and applied research.

The week’s events included a meeting between CSU presidents and White House education leaders to discuss the CSU’s nationally-acclaimed outreach initiatives to improve college access and graduation of underserved students.

Led by CSU Dominguez Hills President Mildred Garcia, a member of the President's Advisory Commission on Educational Excellence for Hispanic Americans, the discussion focused on programs such as the CSU’s partnership with more than 100 churches to enhance college awareness among African American families; the annual Parent Institute for Quality Education (PIQE) training of nearly 10,000 predominantly Latino parents of middle school students; the CSU’s partnership with Univision to produce the "Es el Momento" Latino community education fair; college fairs for specific subgroups of Asian/Pacific Islander families; and outreach to Tribal communities to improve college participation of Native American students.

Roberto Rodriguez, special assistant to the president for education policy, spoke about the Obama Administration's Education Blueprint, a document that links the strength of the American economy to the education system.