Academic Freedom for Students

AS-2676-04/FA - November 11-12, 2004

RESOLVED: That the Academic Senate of the California State University (CSU), recognize that the academic freedom of students rests first upon their access to a high quality education and their right to pursue a field of study that they deem appropriate and desirable; and be it further

RESOLVED: That the Academic Senate CSU reaffirm its support of the principles of academic freedom as they apply to the rights of students in a class and university environment that fosters civil discourse, respect, open inquiry and freedom of expression; and be it further

RESOLVED: That the Academic Senate CSU affirm further that these principles also support the University's mission to foster in students a maturity and independence of mind by providing within the class and university an environment where students as well as faculty are free to express the widest range of viewpoints within the standards of scholarly inquiry and professional ethics; and be it further

RESOLVED: That the Academic Senate CSU urge all campus senates to review and/or create policies and procedures that advance the principles stated above; and be it further

RESOLVED: That the Academic Senate CSU also urge campus senates to make these policies and procedures easily accessible and undertake processes to educate their campus community about the meanings of academic freedom; and be it further

RESOLVED: That the Academic Senate CSU send this resolution to the Chancellor, the CSU Board of Trustees, CSSA, CSU Presidents, the CFA Board, and chairs of the Senate Education Committee and Assembly Higher Education Committee in the California Legislature.

RATIONALE: The Academic Senate of the California State University needs periodically to remind the public that it endorses the importance of academic freedom for students as well as faculty members and that the CSU and its campuses have procedures for both students and faculty who believe their rights to academic freedom have been violated. Further, essential to the acceptance of the concept of academic freedom is the notion that truth is best discovered through the open investigation of data and through a broad and open inquiry regardless of personal beliefs. Such inquiry requires an atmosphere devoid of fear of reprisal, or ridicule.

APPROVED - January 20-21, 2005


 
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